Rogers can’t charge fees for copyright infringement services, rules Federal Court of Appeals

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  • mastjaso

    >”However, the FCC enforced incredibly strict restrictions on Voltage, in an attempt to protect the rights of those suspected copyright infringers.”

    The FCC enforced *fair and sensible* restrictions on Voltage. They’re only “incredible” if you expect your government to value businesses more than people.

  • Magic18

    Rogers = robbers
    BT streamers = thieves

  • Jason

    That fee alone will stop Rogers from helping people. It’s also terrible how allot of these smaller production companies rely on these dumb claims to make their money

  • kaito1412

    With all due respect, there needs to be a couple of clarifications about the law.

    The Federal Court of Canada is an umbrella term for federal courts. The FCC includes the appeals court (the Federal Court of Appeal) and the lower trial court (simply, the Federal Court). The FCC and the FC are related but not the same thing.

    Next, Appointed Judge is not a title. Justices of appellate courts are historically referred to as Justice of Appeal, or J.A. For example, Justice of Appeal David Stratas. In modern usage, it is acceptable to refer to the judge as Justice Stratas, even if he were to sign his judgement as Stratas J.A.

    Finally, there appears to be confusion between whether a court judgment is binding, or persuasive. Canada is a federation that seperate legislative authority between the federal and provincial governments (as an aside, copyright law is the exclusive jurisdiction of the federal government). A federal appeal only binds lower federal courts, not provincial courts. Provinces have their own independent system of binding rulings. Having said that, a) decisions by appeals courts may be very persuasive in a non-binding court if there is no existing binding decision, and b) the Supreme Court of Canada is a court that reviews both federal and provincial courts and hence an SCC ruling binds both courts.

    Keep up the good work.

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