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Siri on your Apple Watch, iPhone and iPad can now access Health data for you

Siri can now handle over 20 types of health data stored on Apple devices, such as activity rings, steps, distance, heart rate, blood oxygen

Apple has released the public build of watchOS 10.2, iOS 17.2 and iPadOS 17.2, all of which allow users to access and log health data via Siri.

The feature is available on all iPhones that can update to iOS 17.2, iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd-Gen and later), iPad Pro 11-inch (1st-Gen and later), iPad Air (3rd-Gen and later), iPad mini (5th-Gen and later), and iPad (8th-Gen and later) and the Apple Watch Series 9 and Apple Watch Ultra 2, thanks to their on-device Siri request processing.

This means that users can interact with Siri without sending their health data to the cloud, ensuring greater privacy and security.

As shared by Apple, Siri can now handle over 20 types of health data stored on Apple devices, such as activity rings, steps, distance, heart rate, blood oxygen, sleep, blood glucose, blood pressure and more.

Here are some of the example questions that you can use:

“Siri,”

  • “How does my Move ring look today?”
  • “Did I close my Exercise ring?” 
  • “What’s my step count?”
  • “How far have I walked this week?”
  • “How far did I bike yesterday?”
  • “What’s my heart rate?”
  • “What’s my blood oxygen?”
  • “How much did I sleep last night?”
  • “How much have I slept this week?”
  • “What’s my blood glucose level?” (Requires a third-party monitor connected to the Health app)
  • “What’s my blood glucose level?” (Requires a third-party monitor connected to the Health app)

Additionally, users can also use Siri to log health data by saying: “Siri.”

  • “I took my 8 a.m. medications.” (Users must set up a medications list in the Health app to log this data)
  • “Log that I took my multivitamin.” (Users must set up a medications list in the Health app to log this data)
  • “I weigh 167 pounds.”
  • “My period started today.”
  • “Log that I have spotting today.”
  • “My blood sugar is 122.”
  • “Record my blood pressure as 118 over 76.”
  • “Log my body temperature as 98.3 degrees.”

It’s worth noting that you need to allow Siri to access health data before using the feature. To do so on an iPhone, go to Settings and select Health > Data Access & Devices > Siri, and toggle on “Access Health Data.” On your Apple Watch, open Settings and select Health > Apps and Services > Siri, and toggle on “Allow Siri Access to Health Data.”

You’ll also need to go into Siri settings and change the language to English (US).

The feature’s availability seems to be spotty for now. My colleague Bradley Bennett and I could use the feature on our iPhones, but not on the Apple Watch Ultra 2.

The new Siri features for health data are currently available in English (US) and Mandarin Chinese (China mainland). Apple says “more languages to follow.”

Image credit: Shutterstock

Source: Apple

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