BlackBerry KEYone review: The physical QWERTY keyboard makes a comeback

BlackBerry KEYone keyboard

The Pros

  • Physical keyboard melds well with screen
  • Improved image sensor
  • Hub remains the best email client on Android

The Cons

  • 4.5-inch screen has awkward resolution and aspect ratio
  • Physical keyboard is determining factor
  • Convenience key needs more functionality

For some, BlackBerry’s new KEYone flagship phone will seem like a pointless attempt at regaining lost respectability, but with less risk attached this time around, the device may hit the right note for a modest user subset.

An Android phone through and through, the KEYone puts the physical QWERTY keyboard (dubbed the “Smart Keyboard”) front and centre for the classic BlackBerry look. Indeed, the BlackBerry Classic appears to have been an inspiration here, but there’s a mix of this design that is unusually interesting.

Having seen the device during CES in January, it’s now evident nothing really changed on the outside. At the time, specs inside weren’t revealed, but it is equally clear some sacrifices were made, despite Android 7.1.1 Nougat coming pre-loaded.

As has been the case with just about every BlackBerry to launch in the last few years, the KEYone comes with questions over who it is made for. Business users who want physical keys? Or are personal users likely to find something uniquely worthwhile in this device?

A throwback with a twist

Blackberry keyone back

The KEYone’s design philosophy sits in stark contrast to what Samsung and LG have already unveiled with their respective flagships. They increased screen size at the expense of the bezels surrounding it. BlackBerry and TCL could do no such thing because of the physical keyboard sitting below the 4.5-inch display.

BlackBerry attempted something similar before with the Passport, except that device’s squared form factor was an acquired taste. This design feels different. It’s certainly wieldier, but it also conveys a feeling of being more in line with the quality of other Android handsets. The aluminium frame not only looks nice but feels rigid to hold. The KEYone doesn’t have front-facing speakers like the DTEK60 does, yet the external sound is still more than adequate.

Certain details were carried over from the Passport, particularly the keyboard’s touch-sensitive gestures and the rubberized back. Adding a fingerprint sensor to the space bar also proves to be a wise move, adding a fitting security layer for the device’s promise of heightened protection.

Blackberry keyone back

TCL’s fingerprints (no pun intended) are evident too. The Convenience key on the right edge below the volume buttons mirrors the design and functionality seen in the DTEK50 and DTEK60.

Beyond that, it’s clear both BlackBerry and TCL wanted to avoid recycling components. The Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 is hardly cutting-edge, but the inclusion of the Sony IMX378 image sensor for the 12-megapixel rear camera represents a boost compared to what the previous models used. The keyboard itself is obviously a throwback with plenty of familiarity to it, just not as an exact replica of the one used in the Classic.

A different kind of screen

Blackberry keyone main screen

With the keyboard figuring so prominently in the KEYone, the 4.5-inch display also takes some getting used to. This isn’t like the Priv, where you could effectively ignore the slide-out keyboard altogether. The two work in tandem a lot here, and by default, the virtual keyboard is nowhere to be found.

It’s an easy fix through the settings, but it’s the kind of presumptive move BlackBerry diehards would love, whereas others might feel too restrictive. Personally, I took a hybrid approach and enabled the virtual keyboard too.

The screen’s 1620 x 1080 pixel resolution is HD, albeit with a 3:2 aspect ratio. Again, this is the opposite of the 18.5:9 aspect ratio featured in devices like the Galaxy S8 and LG G6. Not surprisingly, black bars appear above and below videos unless they’re older shows filmed in 4:3.

It affects apps less, but there’s an obvious trade-off at work when using an app or playing a game that looks better with wider screen real estate. An old mantra might be that productivity doesn’t discriminate on screen size, but I would argue that’s less true today than ever before. Granted, space is less of an issue when composing messages, but with the industry seemingly bursting at the seams to go bigger, the KEYone does feel like an outlier.

Keyboard redux

BlackBerry KEYone

BlackBerry users know the physical keyboard has utilitarian qualities, except it’s debatable whether that detail is widely known these days. Shortcuts can be assigned to all 26 keys, multiplied by two for 52 total.

This isn’t new, and was a fixture going back to the Priv, except the convenience does get easier to appreciate over time. Holding down a key to call someone or launch a specific app makes the keyboard more than just a tool to type messages or emails. Other phones use a dedicated physical button to do something specific, be it the Bixby launcher on the Galaxy S8 and S8+ or the physical camera shutters Sony has used for years.

Even with the Convenience key on the right edge, the extra shortcuts are nice to have because of the key’s limitations. I tended to use it more as a shortcut to a map destination rather than anything to do with productivity. The keyboard’s shortcut options were considerably more extensive.

koeyboard side view

The fingerprint sensor on the keyboard is not only well-placed, it is also wonderfully responsive. It felt like nanoseconds to unlock the screen by simply placing either thumb there. Plus, being able to unlock the screen while the phone rests on a table is a big reason why I like the sensor in front rather than on the rear.

The touch-sensitive gestures for scrolling and erasing text are pretty much the same. Typing triggers the patented ‘crunch’ sound of the keys. Seasoned BlackBerry users will feel right at home, despite the slightly different keyboard design.

Looking to feel secure

Blackberry keyone dtek app

There are no major surprises on the security side, though having Nougat pre-loaded should be a boost. BlackBerry’s monthly security updates come standard in the KEYone. I haven’t heard the company boast of it being “the most secure Android phone” available, but it is implied based on the heritage of the DTEK devices.

Is it true? Android can never truly be fully secure, in my opinion, but at least BlackBerry’s DTEK app simplifies security basics that are otherwise readily available through Android’s settings. The monthly patches are certainly nice, and nothing to scoff at considering how lax other Android manufacturers are at pushing those out. To make it obvious, BlackBerry even added an update app to manually check for updates instead of having to go through the settings.

BlackBerry and TCL can do this because this version Android is almost entirely stock. Save for some of the nuances, like the three-button widgets under apps, for example, it’s all pretty vanilla.

Pushing productivity

blackberry keyone shortcuts

It’s unsurprising that productivity is a pillar the KEYone rests on. A physical keyboard, coupled with the Hub+ suite, makes for a nice combination. Indeed, there is nothing quite like the Hub for messaging on Android. Having text, BBM and multiple email accounts, plus notifications for WhatsApp, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Slack and Instagram all rolled into one interface is incredibly useful.

It’s lacking the full breadth of the Hub in BB10, but is arguably the best email client on Android, and comes included in the KEYone, with all the various apps that make up Hub+. The Productivity Tab sliding in from the screen’s edge was given a slight makeover recently, and it ties into the Hub reasonably well. I just haven’t found much use for it, personally.

Blackberry keyone google assistant

The included app suite does offer something tangible. Notable simplifies annotating images or screenshots. Content Transfer smooths out the process of migrating over to the KEYone. Notes and Password Keeper are carryovers from the Hub.

Workspaces has been included, though it is aimed more at businesses managing devices for employees. The openness of Android naturally provides plenty of options for other productivity apps, leaving more than enough room for customization.

Getting a camera upgrade

blackberry keyone camera

Adding the Sony IMX378 image sensor is an upgrade to what has long been mediocre camera performance from both BlackBerry and TCL. Colour balance and vibrance have certainly taken a step forward in the KEYone as well.

However, BlackBerry needs to fix the focusing and image stabilization. It can be unforgiving when suddenly hitting a tipping point for close-up distances, all but ensuring a loss in sharpness after snapping the photo. A software update could probably fix this, but given BlackBerry’s camera missteps upon launch in the past, this shouldn’t have been overlooked. The autofocus is reasonably quick, though struggles a little when the lights dim.

BlackBerry Keyone usb-c

In a strange move, BlackBerry also relegated Manual mode controls to the camera UI’s settings menu, rather than the Mode section. Functionally, it makes little sense, and the worst part is that it doesn’t remember your selection when shooting with the screen unlocked.

Launching the camera from the lock screen, I could switch to Manual, only to have to do it again a minute later when I took a quick snap straight from the lock screen.

All that being said, the foundation laid here bodes well for the camera’s longer-term performance. It’s certainly not on par with the best cameras available, but software tweaks will help produce better results that bring it closer.

Battery life and call quality

BlackBerry keyone in hand

Going a full day on moderate usage with the KEYone wasn’t a problem. I would hesitate to say the phone has outstanding battery life, but it’s more than serviceable. Having a smaller display and resolution helps, as does using the physical keyboard more than the virtual one.

Call quality is one of those things BlackBerry devices consistently do well, and the KEYone is no exception. The earpiece speaker is nice and clear, with people I spoke to noting that I sounded better. It’s not any better or worse than the DTEK60, for the most part, but is among the best I’ve used so far this year.

Wrap up

The $199.99 contract price is cheaper compared to what flagships go for these days, and as of this review, no outright price has been revealed. The KEYone will not be available unlocked through ShopBlackBerry.com, making the carrier strategy more evident.

The thing with a device like the KEYone is that it must have a draw to warrant users buying in. The physical keyboard isn’t enough on its own, so BlackBerry and TCL try to make their case with an interesting design that tries to bridge different facets together.

BlackBerry and TCL aren’t brazen enough to hype the device too much, sticking to the relative safety of labelling it as more of a work phone. It’s not an inaccurate description. If I wanted a phone to be entertained more than to get work done, the KEYone wouldn’t be my first choice. Competition is stiff, even from devices that might be classified more as ‘toys’ than ‘tools’ but it didn’t take long for me to like this phone.

Either way, the physical keyboard determines whether you go with the KEYone or not. You’re not given much of a choice, regardless. It’s omnipresent for those who want real keys rather than onscreen ones.

"BlackBerry and TCL aren’t brazen enough to hype the device too much, sticking to the relative safety of labelling it as more of a work phone"                                                                                                                                                                                                       8/10

Comments

  • jellmoo

    I’m really interested in trying the KEYOne out. The current trend of eliminating bezels at all costs isn’t really for me, and I love the build quality the KEYOne has. That being said, I really need to try the keyboard out first, as I’m worried it will be too small for me to use well.

  • bigshynepo

    Day one buy for me, hurry up and get here KeyONE!

  • Roger

    It should be good for emails and messaging; not for media consumption, though.

    • jellmoo

      That’s pretty much a given. Media consumption and gaming will be far better suited by other devices in a similar price range. Productivity and longevity seekers are the target market of the KEYOne.

    • cheetose4

      It’s a great phone for a company to give out to their employees to be efficient at work related stuff (i.e, emails and messaging and to snap occasional workable pic) . Your boss is not paying you to watch youtube or to play games :p

      Although, the physical keyboard could be exploited for some games as the physical keys could be used for alternative for gamepad controls that you would have on a game console or gameboy.

    • Roger

      No doubt it’s good for business use. However, many in my office have jumped to iPhones once our IT started offering them as an option. Even our COO who is one her phone all the time (not talking) is on an iPhone.

  • Garrett Cooper

    This looks like a really nice option for those desiring a physical keyboard. While I never liked BB devices, that was typically because of the OS years ago. I won’t be buying one of these, but I hope enough people do as I’d like to see a Canadian tech company get out of the gutter.

    • dannyR

      BlackBerry is depending on software, services, and embedded systems to get out of their gutter. Even this device isn’t really BB.

  • dannyR

    Sounds like a phone for the traditional BB base. But the longer and more extensive and comprehensive the review, it seems the more the problems, eg.:

    “…using the KEYone was mostly a pleasant experience until after about a week with it. That was when I started experiencing rather noticeable slowdown and other problems.” –Android Police

    Perhaps these things will be resolved at, or after release; ‘problems’ are exactly what enterprise BB users do not need.

  • Captain Henry Morgan

    I am curious what KeyOne has to offer. I will probably get one since I am not particular with newer specs in the market. My iPhone 6s still runs pretty fast and probably don’t need a new one until it reaches 3 years of its life.

  • Andrew

    Is the Snapdragon 625 faster or slower than the 808? I find my Priv struggling with the 808 and 3 GB of RAM (Same as the KEYone) and the physical keyboard is frequently jumping the cursor around and deleting text. Makes me hesitant to buy this device.

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      Much slower

    • jellmoo

      Slower at GPU intensive tasks, slightly slower at single core tasks, considerably faster at muti-core tasks.

    • cheetose4

      Don’t forget 625 is way more energy efficient than the 808 and even is more energy efficient than a 820 or 821.

    • jellmoo

      Yup. It sips power at a lower rate, which gives some nice longevity to get you through the day.

    • JD

      Just wish the GPU was more powerful even one from the SD805 would be merciful

    • dannyR

      It sounds like code problem. That sort of operation shouldn’t trouble any half-decent cpu.

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      Yes, half decent

    • Beautiful Blessings

      A wise man shall temper his haste lest he purchases a…turkey.

    • charlie2010

      re: Is the Snapdragon 625 faster or slower than the 808

      Smaller screen, lower resolution means fast, responsive phone with great battery time.

  • Surveillance

    Anybody else think the S8 and S8+ look way too long and narrow and flimsy? And then I see this KeyOne that looks solid and sturdy without the ridiculous screen. I’d be willing to give this a try! And no, I’m not being paid to say this

    • dannyR

      Sounds like code problem. That sort of operation shouldn’t trouble any half-decent cpu.

  • Adam

    So, Telus (consumer) isn’t going to carry it, and BlackBerry won’t sell it directly like their other devices? This would/will be a day 1 buy for me, if I can actually manage to buy it somehow.

    I feel like BlackBerry is sabotaging themselves by not selling it directly, and I’m less then pleased that Telus won’t be selling it to consumers, while it looks like Rogers and Bell will be.

    • Chris Guglielmelli

      BBMobile claims they will sell one unlocked on Facebook, so colour me confused.

    • Adam

      In the Canadian market? I know other markets are selling it unlocked, just not apparently their home market, for whatever reason.

    • Chris Guglielmelli

      Apparently my comment needs to be “approved” or something. But a user on Facebook asked them about it and they said “SIM free unlocked options will be available.”

    • Zach Gilbert

      We reached out to BlackBerry Mobile and they said “At this time, all we’ve announced is the carrier availability of KEYone.”

    • Adam

      Thank you for looking into that. I tried to reach BBMobile and Telus yesterday with no luck.

      That’s unfortunate news, needless to say.

    • ToniCipriani ✓pǝᴉɟᴉɹǝʌ

      The official press release states US will have unlocked in both GSM and CDMA variants, that’s probably what they are referring to.

    • Techguru86

      From what I remember, all the big 3 are carrying it, just might be online only, especially since Telus has a huge enterprise customer base. Freedom is not selling it

    • Ali F.

      Freedom should have been the first one to sell it due to their limited choices of handsets compared to the big 3.

    • Techguru86

      How they have everything except crapple products and if you do your research, you’d know that the KEYone doesn’t support there Lte network

  • TheCuddlyKoala

    They’ll sell hundreds!

    • kirfer

      I applaud your optimism!

    • Beautiful Blessings

      T’will be written in the book…the sales book, and none shall argue with that which is written in the ..er…book. Of sales.

    • kirfer

      Or, as Enya, the prophetess of Waterloo, would have it:

      Sale away, sale away, sale away

      Heck, that’s three sales already!

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Praises be! The Holy Trinity!

  • Rimtu Kahn

    Please make priv 2, with the latest market competing technical specs.

  • will

    No band 66 support! Bummer. One may say…oh for wind LTE….no…telus also acquired band 66….Future proof is what I mean

    • dirtyKIMCHI

      The SnapDragon 625 with its integrated X9 will likely never support Band 66 LTE.

      The next flagship device should use the top tier Qualcomm SoC (825 with integrated X16 modem) which has Band 66 (& soon 600MHz [Band 71]) support.

    • ToniCipriani ✓pǝᴉɟᴉɹǝʌ

      I’m sure the upcoming 660 with the X10 will support it too.

    • dirtyKIMCHI

      Let’s hope so. It will be officially announced this Tuesday May 9th.

    • dirtyKIMCHI

      Well, now it is known that it will be a X12 modem (same as the 820) going into the 660, so Band 66 LTE is more than likely as the X12 does have support (the V20 has a 820+X12 and has Band 66 compliance).

    • Techguru86

      it will work with Freedom’s LTE in Ottawa, Kingston and Peterborough as those areas don’t utilize band 66

  • Adam

    I guess we’ll see soon. Hopefully it wasn’t just a dodge of the question, because technically they’re not lying, but they didn’t specifically say Canada either. Fingers crossed. Also fingers crossed the unlocked pricing is reasonable and inline with other markets.

    • Our dollar is pretty low. so it will likely be a lot for us outright.

  • kirfer

    8/10 seems to include a generous bonus of 2/10 for being a Canadian company. Really, everything throughout the review says “meh after meh after meh…”, and then 8/10 emerges randomly at the end?

    • Ted K

      I’ll try to explain my rationale. The score reflects what the phone offers for those who want the keyboard. Those who don’t care for a keyboard won’t even consider this anyway, so the score is irrelevant for them. The fact BlackBerry is Canadian is immaterial to me. The KEYone is a nice phone for a particular subset.

    • kirfer

      Sure thing: but what’s peculiar is that “nice phone/not a bad phone (which is how the review read… camera: meh, battery life: meh, functionality: middling, speed: not really addressed, form factor: meh…)” became 8/10.

    • Ted K

      For the user who wants messaging and productivity, performance will be fine. I can’t speak to how it might be a year from now, but it functioned well for me. Since media consumption would be secondary on a device like this, speed and performance were largely based on how the phone managed with mixed, moderate usage. The form factor is unique for obvious reasons. As I noted in the wrap up, the keyboard is a determining factor. Based on my experience, I’m of the mind that users who want a keyboard will like the KEYone.

    • dannyR

      So, based on the contexts: keyboard, enterprise user, specs v competition-at-that-time, you would have assigned the Priv a 9/10 in your ‘6 months later’ review last year? And remembering the Priv was long released and had some of the rough-spots ironed out, which this one (based on a weeks-long Android Police use and review) most certainly has not?

    • Ted K

      Assuming I review the KEYone six months from now, we’ll see how it holds up. I can’t comment on what other reviewers have experienced, nor their criteria.

    • dannyR

      Perhaps my question was too long-winded.

      “The BlackBerry Priv, six months later
      By Ted Kritsonis MAY 6, 2016 8:56 AM EDT 482 COMMENTS”

      Would you give/have given the Priv a retrospective 9/10, based on that Mobile Syrup review of that time?

    • If the KEYone comes to carriers (unlike the DTEK60, wtf BB?) then I’m pretty sure it will be replacing Privs and older BBs at corporate level.

    • Techguru86

      All 3 of Canad’as Big 3 are carrying it just not Freedom Mobile

    • bigshynepo

      “battery life: meh”
      Who said that? The battery life is one of the most highly praised feature of this phone.
      Troll better bud, both you and ‘Actionable Conclusion’ are putting down a pretty pathetic effort here trying to discredit a surprisingly well-received device.

    • kirfer

      Really: “more than serviceable” is damning with faint praise, particularly when the lame previous-generation processor is so often excused because it’s meant to benefit the battery life.

      Let’s be honest: this phone trolls itself. It’s a slightly updated Classic running android. That’s the way to avoid smartphone fatigue: go for nostalgia!

    • Actionable Conclusion

      A particular subset Ted? Let’s get real already The Priv demonstrated how irrelevant that customer base is and this phone will quite likely prove no different
      Blackberry has never understood or gotten the message that these types of devices cater to such a small niche that there is no way they can make any serious money on it and TCL doesn’t get it either
      I guess time will tell but I don’t think anyone will be surprised if we don’t hear anything further about the KEYOne in 6 months

    • Rev0lver

      I completely disagree with your assessment.

    • Stephen_81

      We don’t hear anything about the vast majority of Phones after 6 months, The Keyone wont be a flagship device to be talked about for months, as Ted said, it is for a subset of users. I Will be replacing my Nexus 6P with the KeyOne once is launches. to return to a Keyboard device, Neither the iPhone nor Nexus have converted me to wanting full time touchscreen.

      I am the subset of users. Just like I am a Car buyer who doesn’t want leather interior with all of the other bells and whistles and have to pay more to make that happen quite often.
      Or how there is a subset of drivers who insist on Manual transmissions. They aren’t really the main stream buyer group, but there are still people who buy them.

      My Hope for the KeyOne is that it breaks even for TCL and they continue on with the form factor. They haven’t priced it like the Priv which is a good thing, but yes, it is a small subset of users, is that subset large enough to keep the form factor? that remains to be seen.

  • Ted K

    They only confirmed that it wouldn’t be available outright and unlocked through that site, but it’s still unclear what retail availability will look like in Canada otherwise for unlocked versions.

  • JD

    The priv remains the best phone BBRY has ever made its too bad it was during the SD810 era. If it launched a year earlier with the SD805 it would have been a winner

    • Techguru86

      Priv didn’t have the 810, it had the 808 because the 810 was so poor

    • JD

      I never said it did I said it was in the era of the SD810

    • Actionable Conclusion

      Oh puleeze The Priv was total garbage with lousy build quality and a poor keyboard to boot to say nothing of bad battery life and generally poor Android quality
      It flopped for good reason and to claim it was the “best” is disingenuous at best

    • JD

      Yet still the best Blackberry. So what does that say about the rest of them?

    • Actionable Conclusion

      Yeah I see your point Garbage all around

    • Rev0lver

      I’m sorry but you’re incorrect.

    • bigshynepo

      But in the comment above you chastise Blackberry for discontinuing a phone you think is garbage. So what is your angle? Complain about the phone, complain about it being discontinued and replaced by a better phone?
      Your trolling is embarrassing, I’d work on it if it’s your claim to fame around here.

    • Actionable Conclusion

      No. They never should’ve released the phone in the first place because they knew it would fail which also largely explains why they never bothered to market any of the stuff properly.
      Easily the most cynical company in tech today and the only one embarrassing themselves are those that hype up pre-2005 designs as ‘innovative’

    • Ricky Bobby

      BlackBerry has never really marketed their products so why would the Priv be any different?

    • Actionable Conclusion

      lol…And yet they expect success? Give your head a shake man. I remember back in the day when they were quite dominant they were a helluva more adept at marketing than they’ve been the past 5 years, or at least since 2007.

    • Ricky Bobby

      BlackBerry has essentially never marketed their devices. They got huge in the enterprise space… which blew up their appeal in the consumer space. The “CrackBerry appeal” is why their sales grew… not because of effective marketing.

    • Actionable Conclusion

      Thats total bunk. I remember very well seeing advertisements in public spaces for BB devices and at a minimum carriers with promotional materials in store. They may never have been big on TV advertising but they made a much better effort back in the day than they’ve ever tried to do the past 5 years.

      And sales grew here because they were the only game in town. They never understood competition nor felt they needed to. It was and remains a supremely arrogant company out of touch with the market it tries to remain relevant in.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Verily…they have relied on ‘word of mouth’ but how shall the deaf, blind and dumb mute sing their praises now, oh Bobby Ricky…?

    • bigshynepo

      Reporting my comments for removal because I called you out for the lifeless troll you are – that’s hilarious.
      If you have time to report comments, you have time to go get a job.
      Start giving back to the world that puts up with you.

  • JD

    Too late most government agencies in Canada have already jumped to iOS.

    • Ali F.

      Disagree. None at our agency has moved (5000 employees).

    • JD

      Disagree. Go check the VoRs and the RFTs put out.

  • imjohnh

    it looks like a very advanced device; I’m thinking early 2000’s MP3 player. Zuneberry anyone?

    • kirfer

      Only if it comes in that delightful shade of brown!

    • Beautiful Blessings

      I have just the right shade in mind; it is stuck to the sole of my sandal…

    • kirfer

      Classic Zune, circa 2006.

      Gorgeous!

    • bigshynepo

      What’s the sound of 3 people laughing?

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      Someone making an iPhone joke at a blackberry convention?

    • Ricky Bobby

      Whipping out the iPhone would get much more laughs.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Indeed, for the hysteria would be greatest at one minute to mid o’ the night…before the stroke of doom for this once-relevant manufacturer of novelty devices.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      T’is gallows humour, my friend; a joke made at the darkest hour to assuage trembling and fearful hearts.

    • bigshynepo

      You aren’t nearly as clever as Beautiful Blessings, are you?

    • Beautiful Blessings

      You riddle me like the prophets of old…I will read the runes to seek the answer, my friend.

  • Ali F.

    Imagine an iPhone with a Keyboard!!

    • cheetose4

      Knowing Apple and Apple’s users if that was a thing the physical keyboard would only have emojis and no actual letters.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Indeed? Well, that would be innovative, would it not my friend…?

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      Please no.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      T’would be an abomination from the abyss…I tremble in fear.

  • fred

    This is going to fail so badly.

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      It already has.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Forsooth, ye have read the runes and interpreted their portent of doom.

    • bigshynepo

      Compared to what?
      Previous Blackberry releases or Apple’s latest phone?
      I could see why this phone may not appeal to a person who just plays games on their phone all day, but this phone is excellent for professionals and I can’t wait to pick it up day one.

    • fred

      This will fail compared to just about anything you can think of.
      Professionals are not getting this phone. You are the exception. Blackberry’s phone sales will continue to go downward, as they have for the previous years.

    • Ricky Bobby

      Since you can see the future, will you please share who will win the World Series and the Superbowl so I can place my bets now….

    • Actionable Conclusion

      Do you understand anything about the history of this company? lol….All their past devices flopped and flopped hard by any reasonable measure so care to tell us why this is so different? Or is the ‘this time will be different’ argument what you’re going with?

    • Ricky Bobby

      Flopped according to who? Just because they don’t sell iPhone or Galaxy numbers doesn’t mean their devices are a flop.

    • Actionable Conclusion

      By any reasonable metric in this industry selling less than 10 million units is a flop
      You think selling half a million or even a million of these things is a success? lol

      You can’t make money with these numbers and by proclamation justify being in the business

    • fysicsguy

      I am with Ricky om this page, who do we care what if the device succeeded or not. If it good for me i don’t need anybody’s opinion to tell me. I have tried all and right now i am trying android too again but i can’t just pass on my windows phone as it’s the best in the market for my use. So why are you arguing “actionable conclusion”. You like something enjoy don’t force opinions and if this phone is not a success story or not of interest you should.not be snooping around these articles, as this proves you are not happy with what you use currently

    • fred

      Blackberry has as much chances to have success with this device as you have to win (or even play) in the super bowl.

      I know Blackberry is a Canadian company and many people here like it because of that, but they’ve been telling us since 2010 that the next Blackberry device is going to be a success when they all failed.

      The only reason to get this is to get a keyboard. People have moved on and can now type much faster on a virtual keyboard (with autocorrect and/or swiping)

    • Ricky Bobby

      BlackBerry is no longer in the handset business and YOU might type faster on a virtual keyboard but your neighbor might prefer to use a physical keyboard.

    • fred

      Blackberry is outsourcing the handset manufacturing to TCL. But it doesn’t matter. Their sales are lower year after year, even though they offer physical keyboards. If people wanted physical keyboards, Samsung and others would offer them too.

    • Ricky Bobby

      “Samsung keyboard cover for Galaxy S8 Plus: A physical keyboard when you need it – ZDNET”

      You were saying?

    • fred

      They make an accessory which won’t sell. Third parties have been making them for years.
      But still, you are much better off with a Galaxy S8 and keyboard accessory than anything from Blackberry. So this is only more bad news for Blackberry as their niche will be even smaller.

    • fysicsguy

      Man believe me virtual keyboard on android js pain in the butt so many auto corrections and it won’t learn despite manually correcting it again and again. I found Windows virtual keyboards and blackberry physical keyboards are the Best

    • fred

      sorry, but I don’t believe you, man

    • fysicsguy

      Again personal preferences and opinions and that’s why I don’t argue or reply to someone on online discussion boards. Enjoy and peace. I love my windows phone

    • bigshynepo

      I think the phone will sell better than their last few releases, but time will tell. There has been a ton of positive press for the KeyONE, enough that it might move the needle a little.

      Also, you’d be surprised how many professionals in Canada, loyal to a Canadian brand, are interested in this phone. I’ve had many chats casually and in business about the device and I can certainly tell that some people are eager to see it release up here in my Country.

    • fred

      we’ve been hearing the same at every new blackberry phone in the past 5 years and every single one of them has been a disappointment. Not that nobody liked them, but few bought them.

    • bigshynepo

      I hear you, Blackberry finally needs a win, a non-disappointment, if you will. With the reviews, this phone finally seems worthy of those who have put in the patience waiting. The Key1 wasn’t made for a brand resurgence, it was made as a love-letter to the fans who have been blackberry owners for over a decade. I personally can’t wait to give it a try.

    • fred

      People said the exact same thing of the Priv. And the phone before. And the other before that.

    • bigshynepo

      I have been agreeing with you this entire time but you seem insistent on:
      A) Convincing me to buy another phone
      B) Getting the last word

      Can’t you just respect my thoughts and opinions without trying to impose yours on me?

    • fred

      Uh? I never cared which phone you buy. Go ahead. But just because you like the phone and will buy it won’t make it a success.
      Why would this phone have more success than the priv? Of course it’s better but the competition improved too, probably even more. And more importantly, people have moved on from Blackberry, and are not looking back.

    • bigshynepo

      I just need the phone to work and the reviews have proven it’s capable of doing that.

      I don’t need it to be a ‘success’, Fred, this is what you just don’t seem to get.

    • fred

      I wasn’t saying this phone won’t be a success for you. I was saying it for Blackberry (in case they don’t know it already)

    • Actionable Conclusion

      Plays games all day? Give it up with this strawman argument already. Have you looked around the business crowd these days? Tell that to some professional that they play games on an iPhone all day or ANY device without keys for that matter. SMH.
      What people like you can’t accept really is that the world has moved on from pre-2005 and that there is sooo much demand out there for PKB devices. lol! Nearly an entire generation of people have moved on to new technology and while this phone will no doubt appeal to die-hard fans of keyboards, in no way will it cause a sea change in the market prompting people to dump iPhones and other Android devices in its favor. That’s the same delusion that has afflicted BB fanboys for nearly a decade to no avail.

    • Ricky Bobby

      Maybe you should read first before responding. He said the phone wouldn’t appeal to anyone that plays games on their phone all day… which is likely won’t because of the form factor. Most people that play games or consume media want the pre-2007 design that the iPhone offers…

    • Actionable Conclusion

      I read him just fine. He says ‘not appeal to a person who plays games’ but for ‘professionals’ to which I said that professionals clearly don’t care about PKB phones given the plethora of other Android devices and iPhones among the business set.

      There is no ‘business’ or ‘professional’ market to corner with this device.

    • Ricky Bobby

      People use their phones for different reasons… some mainly use theirs to play games and consume media… others mainly use theirs for a communication too…. some have a blend… and some have other use cases.

    • Actionable Conclusion

      lol…So? Your point is?

    • bigshynepo

      “sea change in the market prompting people to dump iPhones and other Android devices in its favor.”
      You are the only one proposing this theory, no one else things that is going to happen. Especially not anyone at Blackberry.

      What will happen? A bunch of die-hard loyalists are going to get a well-reviewed, capable phone that will preform well for them. Why do you have such a hate on for that? Take a prozac, bud – you obviously took my jab at smartphone-gamers personally.

  • TheCuddlyKoala

    Why blackberry? Just why?

    • Ricky Bobby

      I don’t think they can answer why you are here whining…

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Doth he not seek knowledge like every man staring into the abyss?
      Temper your wanton cruelty with compassion, my son. Verily.

    • Beautiful Blessings

      A justifiable question, if I may be so bold as to say so; do you fear the answer…?

  • Brad Fortin

    This is the phone BlackBerry should have released instead of the Z10.

  • Jon R. Dreger

    Does it have wireless charging built in?

    • Beautiful Blessings

      Built into the spacebar, I am led to believe.

    • TheCuddlyKoala

      Come on, this is a blackberry….

  • TheCuddlyKoala

    Software Eng: Mr. Chen, we’ve developed a method to let consumers know how secure our phones are.
    Chen: Great! Tell me more.
    Software Eng: When the consumer opens up the ‘Device security status’ It has a graphic that always show the needle in the green and says “Excellent”
    Chen: So the graphic shows the actual security level of the phone?
    Software Eng: No, it’s just a graphic that always shows “Excellent”, and makes them think the phone is secure.
    Chen: Brilliant!

    • Beautiful Blessings

      The covert surveillance of the Cuddly One is beyond reproach; verily, Cuddles knows the secrets of the Berry People.