iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus review

Practical magic

Daniel Bader

September 22, 2015 8:00am

By now, the “S” series iPhone follows a predictable pattern: it retains the same design as its predecessor, but debuts a new flagship feature that, over time, trickles down (or up) to the rest of Apple’s hardware lineup.

This year the new iPhones, the 6s and 6s Plus, debut two of those features. Without them, they would be outstanding phones, awash in hardware improvements and a base level of polish that exceeds every handset manufacturer on the planet. With them, they move the devices even further away from the specs race that envelops Android, focusing on core user experiences.

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About this review

Much of this review was performed using a 128GB rose gold iPhone 6s running a version of iOS 9 that was slightly newer than the GM version but not quite as new as the one that shipped on September 16th to existing devices. References made to the iPhone 6s Plus are from using a 128GB Space Grey model.

All camera and video samples were taken with the iPhone 6s unless otherwise specified. A follow-up review of the iPhone 6s Plus is forthcoming.

Photos of the phones themselves were taken with a Nikon D750 provided by Nikon Canada.

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Device & Display

There isn’t a lot of external difference to the two iPhone 6s models this year, though Apple has been clear that a lot of work went into making the similar-looking aluminum alloy significantly more robust. Not only is the material stronger and less prone to bending, but it appears to be reinforced against scratches, too. So too is the hardier glass substrate, of Apple’s own concoction (unlike most Android and Windows Phone devices, which use Corning’s Gorilla Glass).

An unfortunate situation a few days into my time with the iPhone 6s caused it to come into contact with cement. Though it was in a leather case that absorbed most of the impact (and was worse for the wear as a result), the screen and exposed metal areas were completely unscathed. The company claims that both new phones are stronger and less prone to scratching, thanks to the combination of a new 7000 series aluminum — similar to the Apple Watch Sport — and hardier screen, kilned in the fires of Mount Doom created with what Apple calls a “special dual ion‑exchange process”.

This is a good thing, because the iPhones are slippery, the larger 5.5-inch 6s Plus especially so, given its size and added weight.

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The added weight, imperceptible on the iPhone 6s but noticeable on the 6s Plus, comes from the addition of a pressure-sensitive layer below the glass that, coupled with a new Taptic Engine, enables Apple’s marquee feature, 3D Touch.

These are the first iPhones that actually gain weight and thickness from their predecessors, increasing from 6.9 millimetres thickness and 129 grams on the iPhone 6 to 7.1 millimetres and 142 grams on the iPhone 6s. The 6s Plus gains even more, from 172 grams to 192 grams, while increasing in thickness 0.2mm to 7.3 millimetres.

While there is precedent to this move — the iPad 3 gained weight and girth over the iPad 2 when it was released in early 2012 — it’s clear that Apple feels the compromise is justified. The panels themselves appear unchanged from last year, which continues to separate the devices, especially the smaller iPhone 6s, from their Android counterparts, when it comes to display density.

Apple’s decision to keep its most popular device relatively small and comparatively low-resolution affects only those subjectively put out by the decision. I have never thought, even when directly compared to denser phones like Samsung’s Galaxy line, that Apple made the wrong decision to stick with 720p on the smaller model. And while it’s possible we’ll see a resolution increase next year — the A9 chip inside the phone is clearly capable of pushing more pixels than the iPhone 6s’s 1336 x 750 resolution — any arguments for an increase come down to what is sacrificed. I’m fine with Apple’s argument that 326 pixels per inch equates with ‘Retina’; others may not be, which, if they want an iPhone, will lead them to the 401 ppi iPhone 6s Plus.

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I still find the iPhone 6s Plus too big for my taste, but its battery life and sharper screen make up for it. As someone who likes using his phone in one hand, the 6s Plus is just too tall; there’s an argument that the iPhone’s home button, now that 3D Touch can be used to activate the multitasking menu, is not long for this world — Apple owns a patent related to the integration of Touch ID into display glass — which could significantly shorten the height of the next-gen Plus, but there are millions of people who love the phone’s size. At least it’s well balanced.

The iPhone 6s, on the other hand, is the right size. It’s well-weighted and feels deliberate in its balance. It’s also going to be the right phone for most people.

In addition to the existing Space Grey, silver and gold variants, Apple has debuted a comely new rose gold iPhone that, after spending some time with, is very desirable. Whether the colour will stay trendy in the long term remains to be seen, but Apple hasn’t sacrificed any of its manufacturing prowess in the move to stronger aluminum. I’d like to see a thinning of the antenna lines around the phones, particularly on the silver, gold and rose gold models, but there isn’t much else I would criticize about the iPhone’s aesthetic.

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Performance

Apple ships its new A9 chip inside three devices this quarter: the iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus and, in a more powerful variant, the iPad Pro.

As it does every year, the company promises improved computing performance — in this case, 70 to 80 percent range over last year’s A8, and somewhere closer to 90 percent on the graphics side. While we’ll have to wait for the semiconductor experts to weigh in on the physical differences in this year’s chip, we have some compelling evidence that the A9 is more than just a higher-clocked A8.

The A9 is clocked at 1.85Ghz on both the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, a 32 percent speed bump over the A8. If the A9 was merely a higher-clocked A8 — both are dual-core parts — then we’d expect synthetic benchmarks to scale linearly. But instead we get a 63 percent increase in single-core performance in CPU-based Geekbench 3, and a 53 percent boost in multi-core performance.

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Most impressive is that the dual-core A9 bests the octa-core Exynos 7420 inside Samsung’s latest devices, arguably the fastest chips currently available in the Android ecosystem, in multi-core performance.

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On the GPU side, Apple’s claim of a 90 percent bump in performance over the A8 isn’t quite accurate, but the 75 percent bump I saw in 3DMark Unlimited bumps it above the Note 5’s GPU, one of the most powerful currently on the market.

The reason I bring up benchmarks is because Apple’s A-series chips are often dismissed outright by the Android faithful for their rather conservative clock speeds and core counts; the company has maintained a dual-core CPU setup since the iPhone 4s’ A5.

But Apple’s custom designs have yielded some of the most efficient processors on the market, and the year over year upgrades are astounding, especially since there doesn’t seem to be a de facto need for the performance gains.

It’s clear after using the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus and comparing it their predecessors, they are considerably faster when meandering around the operating system. While that subjective speed bump is somewhat attributable to the clock gains in the A9, much of it is due to the bump in RAM.

That’s right, the new iPhones have 2GB of RAM.

It’s unclear why Apple waited until 2015 to give its flagship devices what appears to be a standard amount of memory in the Android ecosystem, but it wasn’t until using the iPhone 6 Plus that it became apparent a single gigabyte was a system bottleneck. This year, both devices spend far less time refreshing browser tabs and reloading apps from hibernation, and when combined with 3D Touch’s new multitasking gesture (which I will gush about in the next section), iOS 9 feels like a completely different operating system on the new phones.

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3D Touch & iOS 9

iOS 9 is iteration in its purest form. It’s about adding intelligence to a mobile operating system that has heretofore been mostly static. It’s about filling in the gaps, in places such as Apple Maps, and Notes, and in the frameworks, by allowing things like universal links, Spotlight Search, content blockers and Safari View Controller.

The single biggest change to iOS 9, however, comes in the form of a hardware-enabled feature, and one that Apple hopes will convince both existing iPhone users and those on other platforms that the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus are the devices to buy this year.

3Dtouch

3D Touch.

We’ve seen it on the Apple Watch and various MacBooks in the form of Force Touch, but 3D Touch is its more mature sibling. With a layer of pressure-sensitive capacitive sensors under the LCD, the new iPhones can detect subtle changes in force, which convey to the system that instead of a simple tap — the typical input of a smartphone — the user wants to do something else.

That “something else” is where iOS 9 comes in, and where Apple has really differentiated itself from the rest of the industry in the way it fuses the development of hardware and software. Two new system-wide actions, “Peek” and “Pop” combine with home screen Quick Actions to create a second and third layer of interaction. Of course a call needs a response, so Apple has integrated a larger version of the Taptic Engine first seen in the Apple Watch to replace the linear oscillating engine in the iPhone 6.

‘Taptic’ may be a marketing term, but there is reason to be tremendously excited about its proliferation into Apple’s products. Not only does it let users tangibly distinguish between the new iPhone’s various 3D Touch gestures, but it dramatically improves the entire notification experience across the iPhone itself. Coupled with the new chronological conveyance of the Notification Center, the iPhone 6s is a far more capable device for those of us, like me, who receive hundreds of notifications per day.

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But back to Quick Actions, Peek and Pop. On the home screen, a regular tap still launches an app — that hasn’t, and likely will never change — but pressing a bit harder on supported icons reveals Quick Actions.

While many of Apple’s own apps already support Quick Actions — the camera app has shortcuts to take a selfie, or quickly record video, for instance — the first wave of third-party apps have already been updated with native 3D Touch support. Shazam, for instance, lets you quickly begin capturing audio for identification, and there are likely hundreds more apps to come. Even though Quick Actions only save a tap or two, they add up over time.

More important to the schema are Peek and Pop, activated within supported apps by a light press and a subsequent harder one. These two levels perform what, by definition, they are trained to do: preview content in a contained window overlaid on top of the existing app — in Mail, for example, a peek into the actual email from the inbox — and then, if content with the content, a jump into the next layer.

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The best use cases for Peek and Pop right now come from the Mail and Messages apps, but they will soon be fleshed out by any piece of software laden with links to somewhere else on the device. A web link within an iMessage can be previewed without leaving Messages; a swipe up within the Peek window reveals commands such as “Open Link” or “Add to Reading List”, for example. In other apps, swiping left or right within a Peek window reveals shortcuts; in Mail, the defaults are “Mark Unread” and “Archive”, but these can be altered.

What’s notable about 3D Touch isn’t necessarily the individual commands currently available. As with many of its new features Apple merely leads by example, but the API is much more extensible (or will be in subsequent updates). Game developers, for instance, can use 3D Touch to program shortcuts or alternative commands. Note-taking apps could use the equivalent of a Peek to quickly add formatting to text. Drawing apps can use the pressure-sensitive screen to allow users to draw lines with more precision.

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There’s no question that 3D Touch adds a degree of complexity to iOS, an operating system that by necessity has year over year has become more akin to its desktop counterpart. But Apple’s self-imposed limits force itself and developers to creatively work within the constraints of a single-window paradigm.

3D Touch may not change the way people use their phones overnight, and there will be those who choose to ignore its presence on the iPhone 6s. But like Siri and Touch ID were when they were announced — not coincidentally also in ‘S’ years — 3D Touch lays a foundation on which both Apple and its millions of developers can build a new set of app experiences. And to some extent it frees the home screen from the home button, and the apps from their windows.

Imagine a scenario where all you want to do is send your significant other a pre-defined message saying, “I’ll be home soon.” At some point it will be possible to 3D Touch on an app icon, move your finger a few pixels south and complete the intention without ever having lifted your finger from the screen.

Indeed, two of my favourite implementations of 3D Touch right now are both subtle and incredibly powerful. As iOS 7 taught its users to swipe right from the left side of the display to return to the previous layer, apps built like cards on top of one another, the iPhone 6s and iOS 9 will teach us to seamlessly swipe between apps using that same gesture — just applied with a bit of force.

It takes some getting used to, since the system will occasionally misinterpret a 3D Touch swipe for a regular one, but in my two weeks with the new iPhones I learned to harness the power of the multitasking gesture to get a lot more done. In lieu of actual dual-pane multitasking on the iPhone, referencing information between two apps became as simple as Force Swiping back and forth between two apps.

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Lastly, Apple has added the ability to quickly scan between text using a 3D Touch press on the keyboard, alleviating the three step process of hold-swipe-tap for text selection. After pressing down on any key for a moment, the keyboard letters disappear, making the entire surface into a trackpad.

Languishing on a word for a moment will highlight it, allowing you to increase or decrease the selection by dragging the cursor around the screen. It doesn’t always work as intended — Apple badly needs to tweak the sensitivity for word selection — but the idea is sound.

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3D Touch is but one aspect of an iOS that is both heavier and lighter than it was last year. Small changes, such as moving to San Francisco as a system font, helps breath some life into a design that, two years on, has aged very well. Adding a dedicated Siri search bar to the left side of the home screen negates the need to talk to Siri all the time; everything from equations to web searches can now be performed in one place.

iOS always felt fast, but outside of the apps that enabled its intelligence it rarely felt smart. Now you can do far more independent of the apps that, on iOS, one always took for granted to be there to get things done. If you want to ask Siri to play music, or just that one song, you can; if you want to get quick transit directions home, all you need to do is open Spotlight and type the words. A lot of doubters dismiss iOS because it doesn’t look like it’s busy, praising Android because it wears its complexity in the open. iOS 9 can do the same and more, it just hides the seams better.

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Camera

Apple is fond of calling the iPhone “the world’s most popular camera,” and to some extent it is right. More people use an iPhone to take and upload photos to the cloud, be it iCloud, Dropbox, Google Photos or Flickr, than any one other type of phone. And for a while the iPhone’s popularity was a self-fulfilling prophecy, since it was so much further ahead of its competitors in terms of user experience, photo quality and ecosystem.

That changed earlier this year with the launch of the Galaxy S6, which managed to best Apple’s then-flagship, the iPhone 6, in a couple of important areas: spatial detail, and speed. But it became apparent that those two tenets were only small parts of a much more cohesive whole, and today the iPhone maintains its pedigree as the best camera for most people, most of the time.

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Still, Apple’s photo engineering team likely wasn’t content to let Android abscond with its advantages, so with the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus it has increased the number of pixels by 50 percent, to 12 megapixels, while increasing the speed at which the camera app loads and takes its first photo.

The new iPhones also capture 4K video at 30 frames per second, while increasing the base 1080p resolution to 60 frames per second, an increasingly popular rate supported by popular streaming services like YouTube and Vimeo. Apple’s video stabilization is still industry-leading, well beyond anything employed by Samsung and its ilk. Judder is practically non-existent while shooting video, and even the plain 6s’s digital stabilization makes it difficult to tell when the subject is walking.

The larger iPhone 6s Plus is still alone with its optical image stabilization, for reasons Apple won’t divulge, but this year the company has enabled the feature for video capture as well.

While adding 4K video capture was anything but necessary, the results are wondrous to behold. Colours pop, focus is smooth, and frames are constant.

Both the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus have received massive upgrades in their front-facing cameras, too. Keeping up with the rest of the industry, and with its customers’ increasing tendency to capture selfies, they both have five megapixel sensors with F2.2 lenses. But the biggest change may be the implementation of what Apple calls a Retina flash, where the camera senses the ambient light and, as the physical LED does with the rear lens, uses the Retina display to alight the subject’s face.

Without Retina Flash

Without Retina Flash

With Retina Flash

With Retina Flash

 

Given its simplicity, the Retina flash works surprisingly well in lower-light situations, and alleviates the pressure in finding a well-lit area to take a selfie with friends or family.

There are a bunch of things Apple hasn’t changed, though. The phones still have the same five-element F2.2 lens, and the sensors are still a sensible 4:3 aspect ratio.

A 50 percent bump in pixels doesn’t necessarily increase the quality of photos, and Apple hasn’t messed with a good thing in that regard. Daytime photos are lush and beautifully captured, but are most importantly accurate, with near-perfect white balance and a tendency to capture the warmth of a scene, along with an appropriate depth of field. Many of the photos speak for themselves, finding the right balance in every metric: exposure, noise reduction, shutter speed, light sensitivity, and focus.

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But Apple did regress in one area: low-light performance. Because the 12 megapixel sensor in the new iPhones is roughly the same size as the 8 megapixel sensor in the previous versions, the pixels themselves are smaller (1.22 microns versus 1.5 microns). And despite reduced cross-talk between them, which purportedly lowers noise levels in low-light shots, it’s evident when comparing photos of the previous generation to this one that both of the newer models, the iPhone 6s especially, has to compensate by ratcheting up the light sensitivity, allowing grain and noise to creep in.

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iPhone 6s low light

iPhone 6s Plus low light

iPhone 6s Plus low light

iPhone 6 low light

iPhone 6 low light

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iPhone 6 Plus low light

The differences are subtle, but it’s clear that the iPhone 6 Plus captures the best photo. Its optical image stabilization allows the shutter to stay open a quarter of a second, the same length as the iPhone 6s Plus, but the newer phone ramps up the light sensitivity to compensate for the reduced light available to its pixels, increasing the grain. The same thing can be seen between the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s, though arguably the 6s takes a cleaner photo due to the improved noise handling through the A9’s updated image signal processor.

Apple has improved the new iPhones’ cameras in nearly every way over last year, and the single regression detailed above is minor, not because it is insignificant but because most smartphones similarly struggle to capture photos in low light. iPhones have never been leaders in this area because Apple compromises on the size of its sensors, understanding that to enlarge the sensor would be to thicken the phone itself.

The move to 12 megapixels on the back, five megapixels on the front, and 4K video capture are all milestones worth noting, but the takeaway from my time with the iPhone 6s and its optically stabilized kin, the 6s Plus, is that they take incredible photos most of the time.

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Live Photos

Let’s talk about feelings for a second, because many times in the course of reviewing a phone, the methodical pragmatism of how it functions overrides the feelings it evokes.

The feelings extracted from Live Photos, Apple’s photographic pièce de résistance, took me by surprise. 

I was at my aunt’s house for dinner, and my three year-old cousin was running around, a natural centre of attention. I took a photo of her as she was laughing, but Apple’s “Live” banner appeared just above her head as the shutter depressed.

Suddenly, there was a photo, but there was also this moment of her giggling, one that previously I would have had to use the video feature to get. Instead, by tapping down on that static photo I got to see her move and hear her laugh.

Live Photos is a small feature with enormous implications for how iPhone users, and the online photography community in general, capture images. And while no one would argue that the idea is original — variations on the theme have been propagated by HTC and Nokia — Apple’s ability, and tendency, to invariably alter the way people use technology, will make Live Photos into a platform.

At the moment, sharing Live Photos from the iPhone is not particularly easy, since they are enclosed within Apple’s ecosystem of iMessage, iCloud Photo Library and AirDrop, and only viewable on devices running iOS 9, OS X El Capitan, or watchOS 2. But the iOS 9 developer tools contain a Live Photos API, and it won’t be long until we see support from big messaging platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, WhatsApp, Kik, WeChat and more.

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Live Photos are both extensions of, and separate from, the photos one takes with his or her phone. The feature can be toggled within the Camera app, and while any editing will remove the video portion, iCloud Photo Library saves the original. And in the interest of compatibility, when exporting a Live Photo from a Mac, it emerges as a still JPEG and a 15fps video file, useful for sharing outside of Apple’s ecosystem.

Of all the iPhone 6s’s new features, Live Photos is the most enjoyable to use, and the most rewarding to share. As a photographer, it’s also the single best reason to upgrade.

Oh, and you can do this.

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Battery Life

Both new iPhones have batteries five percent smaller than those of their predecessors. In the case of the iPhone 6s, that means a reduction from 1,810mAh to 1,715mAh, and on the larger 6s Plus a change from 2,915mAh to 2,750mAh.

The good news is that battery life has not reduced by a meaningful amount on either phone; the iPhone 6s still lasts most of a day with moderate use, and the Plus a day and a half to two days. But anyone hoping for an increase over last year will be disappointed.

Apple’s ratings of 11 hours of video playback on the iPhone 6s, and 14 hours on the 6s Plus, appear accurate based on my video loop tests, but subjective use was more inconsistent. The iPhone 6s, inevitably more popular than its larger counterpart, doesn’t appear to have enough juice to consistently last the whole day without a short top-up. That stress will be alleviated by going with the iPhone 6s Plus, though then you’re dealing with a much larger phone. It’s easy to buy a battery pack, but that’s yet another accessory.

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Thankfully, with iOS 9 Apple has added a Low Power Mode, cutting off background app refresh, automatic downloads, superfluous animations and automatic mail fetch to extend battery life. There is a cost to functionality in turning it on, but Low Power Mode managed to keep my under-10-percent iPhone 6s alive for two additional hours one night.

Both devices can charge relatively quickly, too, but Apple continues to ship iPhones with one-amp power adapters, instead of the 2.1A versions included with iPads. Using the included adapter, it takes just over three hours to recharge the iPhone 6s, and over three and a half to charge the iPhone 6s Plus; that time is cut by over a third with an iPad adapter, which is, of course, much larger.

Again, compromise.

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Connectivity

As Apple does every year, new iPhones mean faster connectivity. This year, the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus are Category 6 LTE compatible, with theoretical download speeds topping 300 Megabits per second using carrier aggregation, double that of the iPhone 6. The phones also support additional LTE bands compared to last year, including Band 12, which Rogers is rolling out across Canada to shore up its 700Mhz spectrum offering.

The new devices also support WiFi Calling and VoLTE, though so did last year’s models. Rogers rolled out WiFi Calling to the iPhone 5c and higher alongside iOS 9, but Bell is only supporting the feature on the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. As for VoLTE, Rogers, which has experimented with the new IMS-based protocol on some Android devices, it has committed to supporting Voice Over LTE on the new iPhones at a later time.

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Like all iPhones, call quality is loud and solid, though little has been improved this year in that department. The single bottom-facing speaker is, while better than many devices on the market, still relatively weak and sibilant, and can’t match the recent crop of stereo front-facing options from Motorola, HTC and others. With Apple focusing on speaker design on the iPad Pro, let’s hope Jony Ive spends some time focusing on external sound on next year’s iPhone models.

Touch ID has been doubled in speed this year. It is so fast, in fact, that I often don’t even see the lock screen before the phone unlocks; the first few times it happened I had to check to see if the fingerprint sensor was actually enabled. As a result, Touch ID is no longer a two-step process of turning on the phone and unlocking it. It now happens in one fluid motion, and with far fewer negative responses than on either the iPhone 5s or iPhone 6.

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Storage & Pricing

On the storage front, Apple has once again insisted on using 16GB as the base model for the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. Despite assurances that both iOS 9 and the apps that run on it are less storage-hungry, I’d recommend spending the extra $130 CAD and buying the 64GB model. It doesn’t make sense to spend hundreds on the phone you want only to realize a year into your contract you should have opted for the higher-storage version.

Unfortunately, nabbing that 64GB iPhone 6s model means spending $529 on-contract, or $1029 outright. The same size of iPhone 6s Plus is an even harder-to-stomach $659 on-contract and $1159 outright.

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These are Apple’s best phones to date, and certainly worth the money in my opinion, but they’re coming into a Canadian market beset by a weak dollar, and without the financing options to open the door to those who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford it.

There are alternatives: Apple continues to sell the still-excellent iPhone 5s in both 16GB and 32GB versions, and the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus are relatively good deals in both 16GB and 64GB variants.

To get the gold option, or the new rose gold hue, you’ll have to spring for the new iPhone 6s or 6s Plus: that’s just the way Apple wants it.

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Competition

The new iPhones are up against a market saturated with good smartphones. Aesthetically, Samsung’s newest Galaxy models are the closest one will find to the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, and thanks to Samsung’s proclivity towards two release cycles a year, there are four variants to choose from. Of the Galaxy S6, S6 edge, S6 edge+ and Note 5, the S6 is probably the best alternative to the iPhone 6s, and the Note 5 to the iPhone 6s Plus. These phones come the closest to matching the iPhone in terms of speed and camera quality, but Samsung still plays it a little fast and loose with its Android skin, and the company’s software updates are often held up by the carriers, a problem Apple has avoided entirely.

On the less expensive side, Motorola’s new Moto X Play is the best option for a stock Android experience, and the sub-$450 price point is sure to appease the budget-minded smartphone customer.

And if you can get one, the OnePlus 2 is a good deal for a decent Android phone with a few quirks.

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Conclusion

The iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus are two of the best smartphones ever made, and are going to be enormous upgrades to many Canadians coming from the iPhone 5 or 5s.

Despite no upgrades to battery life, a disappointing 16GB of base storage, and an inflated price due to the weak Canadian dollar, there is no reason to think demand will diminish for what is sure to be the top-selling smartphone over the next year.

Tangible improvements, like the addition of 3D Touch, or the camera upgrades, are worth highlighting, but it is the sense of cohesion and thoughtfulness that continues to separate Apple from its competitors year after year.

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Pros

  • Excellent build quality
  • Beautiful design
  • High-quality display
  • Excellent battery life (iPhone 6s Plus)
  • Consistently good camera quality
  • 3D Touch has great potential
  • Live Photos are are great
  • Touch ID speed improvements
  • “Hey Siri”
  • iOS still has the best apps

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Mediocre battery life (iPhone 6s)
  • 16GB base storage is too low
  • Low-light camera performance regression
  • It’s Me

    This is going to go downhill fast

    • FlamesFan89

      I feel like the “here come the trolls” comments, are the new “BB is dead” comments, which are the new “First” comments.

    • It’s Me

      Am I wrong?

    • FlamesFan89

      Does that matter?

    • It’s Me

      Bring popcorn.

    • FlamesFan89

      There have actually been a couple really well reasoned comments already.

      Popcorn tastes great. 🙂

    • Benny X

      you had to mention popcorn. You cruel person.. i’ve been craving popcorn for days…

    • Vito R.

      He was literally talking about you.

    • FlamesFan89

      Oh please, explain. 🙂

    • brayden fleming

      i think he was saying it was LITERALLY posted to you..seeing how your name is flamesfan? thinking hes joking about your user name and the fact that OP was saying there will be flamers/trolls

    • FlamesFan89

      I think you might be reaching a little far with that one

    • Columbo

      Meh, this review was really good. Not as many trolls as usual.

      My biggest knock on the iPhone continues to be its enormous price for what it offers, and people’s willingness to buy it no matter what. If the 6S cost $700 and had an SD slot (or base at least 32GB) it’d be the best option on the market. At a thousand dollars for non-expandable 16GB, it’s simply a rip off.

    • thebeast_3

      Bingo! We have a winner!

    • Mo Dabbas

      I still believe that Apple purposely make the 16Gb the standard as an indirect way to push ppl to buy the $100 (C$130) more expensive variant with the 64gb.
      Regarding the pricing in general. 1k for a phone is definitely a lot. Contract prices are not helping much, you’re still dropping 400-800 dollars depending on model. Which for me, makes it not worth jumping into a contract.

    • Mitchell Palmater

      it’s more so a push towards cloud-based services.

    • josh

      That’s Apple’s excuse. The fact is, this is a multipronged approach to extract as much money from consumers as possible.

      1. As mentioned, 16GB is nearly nothing and as such, 64GB seems like a ton. What’s $130 for 4x the storage!… despite the fact that storage is so cheap now that implementing 64GB as opposed to 16GB in a phone is a matter of a few dollars.

      2. You’ve got the 16GB model?? Don’t worry! Subscribe to Apple Music and enjoy streaming all of your favourite songs without them taking up space on your phone! Oh… ya, there’s a fee for that.

      3. We know that the 16GB model is a very small amount of storage considering the space that the OS takes up… you really can’t do much with it. BUT WE HAVE A SOLUTION! You can store all of your media on iCloud, which frees up your phone for more apps and games!… well, I mean, you only get 5GBs of space on iCloud to start, which can barely hold anything, nowadays. You should probably pay us a monthly or yearly fee to get more storage.

      Apple just gets you from every angle. The problem is, sure, you could use cloud storage for your media, but Cloud storage is useless for apps. If you have a few games and a few productivity apps on your device, you’re dangerously close to 16GB. With Apple phones especially, the closer you get to using up that storage, the slower your device gets.

    • Mo Dabbas

      Couldn’t say it better.

    • jay

      I bought a used iPhone 6 Plus and honestly happy. My last phone was the galaxy s6 but we always thing we need all this ram or widgets but for some people a simple phones makes it. The iPhones are in nothing better but works

    • Mo Dabbas

      I’m glad you’re happy with the phone. That what matters in the end.

    • jay

      All happy with the device I have but we all want more and more

    • Vito R.

      There are definitely phones that are a better *value* for your money. If you’re buying on contract you can get a great deal on a Galaxy S6 which is a pretty good handset. If you’re buying off contract I don’t think the S6 is worth the price.

    • gommer strike

      As you said very well, people are still going to buy it – no matter what.

      And how can we make this “buy no matter what” with any other product of our choosing? It can’t be that hard.

    • Benny X

      The right approach works wonders. Every successful cult leader understands this, and Apple is no different. They have marketing down to a science. Hell, there’s plenty of books out there on the art of persuasion… humans are flawed, in that they can be so easily manipulated.

    • gommer strike

      If you and I decided to manufacture luxury toilet paper – would you say that, if we applied the Apple-esque marketing and their other persuasion techniques, that we’d become the next Apple in toilet paper sales?

    • Benny X

      We won’t know until you try. Let me know how it goes for you. Godspeed and good luck!

    • phonester

      Does anyone understand what “cost of ownership” means? You can sell or trade your 1, 2, 3 year old iPhone (or any Apple product) for a high percentage of your purchase price, so the cost to own Apple devices is actually LOWER than other ptions.

    • Elton Bello

      Haha

    • Benny X

      as appropriate for a Canadian mob, the pitchfork-wielding folk are creeping ever-nearer as the sounds of Rush’s ‘Witch Hunt’ plays in the background!

  • Arecad

    It’s a great phone but I can’t wrap my head around the pricing. It’s just way too much money.

    • thereasoner

      Yep and not starting at 32 GB is pure greed from Apple. Now those who need 32 GB are forced to pay an extra $130 for 64 GB.

    • josh

      Absolutely. I was considering making the switch to a simpler device, so the iPhone was a great idea. For the 64GB version, it would have cost me $1160 with tax. That’s complete insanity. I’ve been hearing people say “you get what you pay for”… no. Apple makes good phones, but they are terrible value for the price.

      Nexus phones, on the other hand, are a great value for the price. I think that I’ll stick with Android.

  • TomShula

    LOL – butthurt MS mod fanbois are rubbing one off on this review. Garbage phone with garbage specs and MS mods buy into the “everything has changed” marketing campaign without proving things have changed.

    Love it. This site is filled with drivel and unfortunately it’s coming from the mods. Nice click bait article.

    lmao.

    • FlamesFan89

      Dude, I’m the opposite of an Apple fan, but iPhones are not garbage. You look like a fool when you say things like that.

      Now, Apple’s marketing is “eye roll” worthy for anyone employing some critical thinking, and the fanyboys can be more than a little difficult to listen to, but the phones aren’t garbage.

      Also, I don’t think you understand what “click bait” means. This was a review. Not one you agree with, but it’s a review, not click bait.

    • cartfan88

      When it comes to Apple many articles on this site may not be clickbait but they are darn close to paid ads.

    • Vito R.

      He said they were modest improvements but the practical magic he was referring to was the 3D Force Touch and the Live Photos.

    • Domino67

      Lol….too bad you are a Flames fan 😉

  • Specimen Yarp

    I will stick with Nexus. It doesn’t look like it was designed by a 13 year old Japanese girl.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Metrosexual folks will start asking you… What’s wrong with men using the hot pink iPhone 6s?

  • marshallpower

    I didn’t read everything of course because Mapple Syrup thinks we can’t discern lies at our age. The price is not only due to the weak dollar, it’s the Apple price, come on…we all know there are equal or better phones than this for much less, I don’t know why this site loves to spread lies day after day. Oh yeah for money, that’s why.

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Yeah. They should pump dogs like Blackberry instead huh. After all paying $700 for a phone with a useless OS is definitely worth the price eh? Keep telling yourself that.

    • marshallpower

      Who talked about BB? The iphone was overpriced when it had the 4 inch screen, imagine now. Same story.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid

    • Mawhayden

      What ever man, your a wolf howling at the moon…..

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid

    • Vito R.

      Yeah, why read and learn something when you can just complain?

    • marshallpower

      There is nothing to learn here, it’s only meant to take money from your pockets. What you can learn though is that you are complaining about other PEOPLE yourself, worse than complaining about greed.

    • Vito R.

      You’re the one complaining about the review. Every company wants to take your money – some just do a better job at keeping their customers coming back than others. No one is forcing you to buy anything – the review is about the new features in the most popular smartphone in Canada and the *world* – I’m happy it was review and that it exists. The competition will keep adding features and lowering their price in order to stay competitive.

      You have iPhone to thank for the Moto E/G/X being as inexpensive as they are for such quality products.

    • marshallpower

      I complained about the lies in the review concerning the price, very different. Apple can thank Samsung too or they would still be selling a 4 inch screen phone and it would still be the best phone even if it was not back in those days when it had only an impossible tiny screen to look at.

    • Vito R.

      So you’re the one attacking the reviewer who is also a person. I would say he’s more experienced at judging phone quality than you are. – you are just ranting and raving and are not adding any value to the comments. The price is the price – everything is due to the Canadian dollar being well below par – the phone prices are the same in the US. The Canadian market is smaller than California – you think Apple is just trying to screw us? Hahaha.

      Sure we can thank Samsung for bigger phones and AMOLED screens too. We can even thank BlackBerry for email on our phones. It’s called COMPETITION and I think it’s fantastic – that’s why we have better and better phones every year.

    • marshallpower

      Forget it, it’s all lies, the price difference is not equal to the exchange rate. Tired of reading lies all over the place. And it has always been overpriced in the first place, yeah blame it on the canadians only, it’s never Apple’s fault.

    • Vito R.

      What’s the price difference? How much are we being “overcharged”?

    • marshallpower

      About 40$, that’s what some Apple fan said lol

    • Vito R.

      Wow. We’re totally getting screwed.

    • marshallpower

      Of course we are….and that’s without counting the other overpriced part, a few hundred bucks for sure. Even people are talknig about not getting the 16GB because they are being stolen at that price…but they want to give even more money to those robbers for a few more GB LOL.

    • Vito R.

      I think everyone should just buy a Moto E for $150. That’s the only phone that should be sold in Canada.

    • marshallpower

      That’s not my point, I would not even exchange my 729$ Note 2 for a 1100$ iPhone…

    • Vito R.

      Why not?

    • marshallpower

      there’s nothing in those iPhones that I need in my Note and my pen is bigger than theirs. 😉 Bye now.

    • Mawhayden

      I think you are as closed minded as the people /company you claim to hate…how ironic

    • marshallpower

      Those who are closed minded are the ones who keep trying to convince me I’m wrong about my own opinion and about revealing the truth about the price of Apple products. I’m such closed minded for saying what millions of people are saying. Name me one thing that I don’t have on my phone that I need from Apple, not one thing. And I definitely don’t need to pay more than everybody else to get what I don’t need in a phone. It’s always funny to see the people attacking me instead of my ideas. How ironic.

    • Mawhayden

      I agree with you on that point, if you like something, that is your choice. Nobody should give you the gears for choosing something you like. Let’s leave at the point people choose phones like sometimes the choose their spouses, love them for who they are and they would do the same to you. Just saying life is sometimes a two way street. I myself, have both platforms and love both….

    • marshallpower

      well said, and I don’t care if people want to use iPhones or even make them rich…but they should not tell lies about a few things that we’ve been talking about for years, like in this case, the excuses for the price for what it’s really worth… that’s all, goodnight.

    • Benny X

      it’s a fugly phone. no thanks.

    • Benny X

      hey, I had an Xperia Ray a few years back and it had a 3.3″ screen. I loved that phone! The meagre 512MB of RAM is what made me sell it, otherwise I’d probably still be using it!

    • josh

      Ya… our dollar sucks, but over $100 more for a phone? That’s taking advantage.

      Other manufacturers are taking the hit, but Apple jacked up the prices as soon as it could.

    • mech986

      Other manufacturers take the hit because they can’t sustain their margin – if they don’t lower the price, no one will buy them because their product will be viewed as ‘overpriced’. Apple seems to sell as many as they can ship in most countries, so people seem to pay the price asked of them. That is not ‘overpriced’ – the demand keeps the price up, Apple has no need to drop prices to sustain or improve demand for their products.

      One can argue whether there is value in the product for the price asked, that’s an opinion. But since the Apple product sells quite briskly at the price asked, it is not overpriced. Overpriced would apply to the S6 series because it hasn’t been selling well, certainly not to expectation, and now Samsung, to stimulate demand, has had to make ‘price adjustments’, offer free trials, and now in some countries, offers to pay your plan costs through to the end of the year plus Google gift cards. That is the definition of ‘overpriced’ to the Android market, or it suggests Android owners don’t like the S6 series enough to buy it, or they just won’t spend Apple prices even for arguably the best Android smartphones out there.

    • josh

      The problem is that Apple has basically created a monopoly with their product. If you want an android device, you have a ton to pick from and they’re coming cheaper and more competitive. If you prefer a device with iOS, you’re stuck with whatever Apple makes next. Samsung has an incredibly difficult time because they have to both compete with other Android OEMs and also iPhone. If Apple allowed other OEMs to create iOS devices, I can guarantee you that the iPhone wouldn’t be as dominant as it is. Apple would have tons of healthy competition that would ultimately be good for the consumer. As it stands, Apple can charge whatever they want because users who’re invested in iOS have nowhere else to go.

    • mech986

      Apple monopoly? No, only creating and supporting their own OS, it’s proprietary and is their core differentiating feature. After that, the iPhone’s best features are the A9 processor and efficient coupling of the hardware and software. The ecosystem across other Apple devices and platforms, and other services (Apple Pay, iCloud, HomeKit, etc.) extend the devices’ use, applications, and usefulness to the user. If the user finds the ecosystem to be desirable, they stick with it, if they don’t, they can leave and use something else (Android, Windows, BB, Tizen).

      You want a company who has spent so much time, energy and money in creating and managing the whole system and making it the “best” they can make it, their competitive advantage, to allow other phone makers use their software, probably modify it, and then sell hardware using iOS and then undercut them on price? History shows that creates commoditization, which results in price competition, and an eventual race to the bottom in costs, great for the consumer, but terrible for the manufacturers- leads to fast eroding margins, decreased budgets for R&D, and eventual consolidation, bankruptcy, or leaving the field altogether. Apple learned long ago under Jobs that that was not going to be the direction they would choose – watched the PC wars and learned from that.

      For Apple to have a “monopoly” they would have to be the ONLY smartphone / cellphone, and OS out there for people to be able to use – and situation probably be created by municipal / regional / state or governmental contract like utilities, phone service were and still are in some places in the US. There is no monopoly by Apple.

      Try to remember what the cellphone landscape was when the iPhone was introduced – 2007, Nokia, Motorola, Blackberry dominant, all running their own software on their own hardware, each introducing feature after feature, platform after platform, trying to get the edge on each other, and these 3 winning in the US by virtue of what they offered and resonated with the U.S. market. There were plenty of smaller players, most offshore, trying to compete on price, and a few with new innovations like larger screens, glass fronts, slide out keyboards, opening keyboards, touchscreens. Most could take rudimentary pictures, do some internet browsing with the 2G networks then, and some even could play MP3s.

      In short, everyone made phones that could do some computer and iPod things, but the market was very fragmented. Jobs and Apple saw the world differently, they saw the phone becoming a personal computing device, a music device, an access device to the Internet – a handheld computer that could make phone calls, do email, and texts. Apple built the iPhone with enough computing power, using their own design for the system and plugging in corresponding hardware. Then they created and wrote IOS to run the whole system, and started integrating iPod, iTunes, Mac and PCI connectivity – the nascent ecosystem.

      When introduced in 2007, the iPhone wasn’t the first smartphone, it may not have been the best “phone”, and it certainly wasn’t the most popular phone at the time. But it was revolutionary in integrating so much with a long term vision of its potential and use. And without a keyboard, asking people to learn a whole new way of input, contact, and finger touch navigation. Fully 50-60% of all phone and computer critics predicted failure, rapid failure, for Apple. Blackberry famously said the iPhone was absolutely no threat to them. And Nokia and Motorola were busy creating their next Flip and Razr models. Google was almost done finishing Android (having bought the software platform) and when they saw iOS, they knew Android would not be competitive with the hardware that existed then – and they hastily pulled it back and rewrote it over another 12-18 months to incorporate IOS functions and ideas, while working with hardware makers who had to revamp their entire line or introduce new ones. Sadly, Nokia, Blackberry, and Motorola blundered themselves into oblivion, while MS windows mobile found few takers.

      Apple’s iPhones are very popular, but Apple chooses not to give them away, nor compete in markets which would undercut their own margins. They charge what they charge, they appeal to “only”15-18% of the overall world market, and they choose to be different, and use their own ecosystem, and furthe develop and add to it. That they are about the fine design details, materials, user experience, and customer support sets them far apart from all other makers, at least here in the US – till recently, who built phones of the same materials, who has brick and mortar (and glass) stores where you can try out or get stuff repaired? And yes, who made a design, minimalistic look, and “coolness” factor in almost every customer point of contact that resonated with many people (and was/is copied ad nauseum today, down to what they wear at product introductions??? Call it marketing, call it manipulation, call it brainwashing, but as a company, and going concern, it is brilliant – creating buzz, coll factor, demand, hype, brand and device loyalty, and expanding their success into other platforms, ideas, and future products. And no, they aren’t required to let other makers or people use their software to compete with them – your protestations about Apple “should” be cheaper, should be made by more, should have more competition is just so much wanting something for less or nothing, as the Internet has taught us. Has anyone else had the guts, resources, and initiative to create a competing and differentiated OS option? Oh yeah, MS, how’s that working out in the marketplace?

      Sorry, if you want iOS and the corresponding Apple Hardware to run it, then figure out how to afford it. It is not meant to be something for everyone, but it can be everything for someone. You guys complain that there are iSheep, but it’s only 15 people out of 100 in the market, hardly a big number, and so small in comparison to the 85 out of 100 HERD who are on Android – you know, software given away to phone makers so they don’t have to sweat their own software or ecosystem, given away so that people can support Google with searches, ads, clicks, and personal data sold to advertisers. Yeah, for Apple, success eventually leads to $$$$, but it’s the same for Google’s $$$$, just from a different backdoor. That Apple has figured out how, and determined to be profitable and sustainable with their business, devices, and software shows their long term vision. Google is doing the same, but Ad revenue, search, and personal data watching, collecting and mining are their methods, and frankly, they wouldn’t care if hardware makers come or go, IMHO.

      Don’t complain that the hardware/software is “overpriced”. If it was, people wouldn’t buy it, they’d demand and wait for it to go down, or they decide the price is worth it, especially compared to the competition out there. Techie or not, male or female, young, middle aged or old, people’s money and their decisions to spend how they want are their own – they are not you and their money is just as good at the checkout.

    • josh

      If your plan was to win this argument by typing far more than I care to read, congratulations. I concede.

      With that said, I think that your point is a little off. Apple created their OS to compete against Windows Mobile and Blackberry, but then Google came out and released an OS and licensed it to several different companies, rather than keeping for themselves to sell. The result is a diverse and competitive market space. The point is, if you are a fan of the Apple OS, you don’t have other options and that sucks for the consumer. It’s not a monopoly, per se, but it has the same affect on the customer – they have no options and the manufacturer is free to charge premiums due to a lack of competition. Aside from being touch screen devices, Android and iOS devices are very different with very different audiences.

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  • Tech Guru

    I bought the 6 Plus from the Apple store to play around with for a week (and then return it), and honestly I was shocked at how mediocre the screen was, how frustrating navigating the OS is with just one giant button at the bottom and just how unpolished iOS really is. Android has issues for sure, but with the way people talk about the iPhone (and the price) you;d think it would be this amazing experience, but it was just so unapologetically meh.

    • FlamesFan89

      That’s been my experience with Apple products as well. They are always talked up as though they are the most perfect devices ever, created by fairies and unicorns, and built with pure rainbow power or something. My experience has always been that they are nice, they are well built, but meh, nothing that makes me go wow, or that makes me think they are worth the extra money compared to other products on the market.

    • Stephie

      I’m on this train as well. I’ve used top end androids and coughed up the money last year for the Iphone 6 to give it a go, but I was honestly not blown away. I look at the Note 5 this year and it’s just so beautiful and the screen is so nice, even my trusty LG G3 panel is more appealing than the Iphones. Sure, its a great piece of technology, but it just doesn’t have any wow factor, nor does it perform leagues better than an android with a better screen and a much smaller price tag.

    • kaostheory

      I agree, and I like the competition Apple has created. At least we’re not in the old MS monopoly that stagnated os’s for years. I personally like real world hardware, so I’m sticking with Sony. I can’t give up noise canceling (use it every day) the extra water and dust protection, wet finger tracking as I use my phone a lot outdoors (skiing, mt biking, hiking), tap to pay (iPhone still not available in Canada) and of course PS4 remote play. If they allow the Z5P to be used as VR with the PS4 it will be a home run for me.

    • Mr_Smoosh

      Completely off topic, but what Sony do you have, and how loud is it? I love loud music, and my Samsung didn’t cut it. I have a One M8, but it won’t last forever…

    • kaostheory

      Don’t have anything to compare, but headphones do a good job of cutting out noise (bus, plane, tools). On one job I was the only one allowed earbuds as they work to cancel noise even without media. Also good for loud coffee shops, and I’m looking forward to the new set coming soon. Oh and doesn’t drain the battery.

    • cartfan88

      Well when you see things in this article like ‘beautiful design’ for what is now basically average…its no wonder people’s expectations are too high. It’s also like when someone goes to use an S6’s camera and it smokes everything out there and are caught off guard.

      Hey let’s distract people more with some space given to the new colour. The best pink ever.

    • northstar17

      I dont see how copying HTC’s design from 3 years ago into the iphone 6 and 6s is somehow new ground, Apple really put out a boring design. iPhone 4 was the last nice device they made.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Most people especially female teenagers and soccer moms like to use this phone due to its simplicity but nothing special.

      For those who go WOW WOW WOW… are trying to convinced themselves that its the best phone. Of course, after spending almost 1K on the phone, you would like to tell yourself that this is one of your best investments.

    • Elton Bello

      If you dont like it, dont buy it…best software and call clarity ever…nexus devices dont compare for call quality….can you tell me one?

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Captain Morgan is a Rimtard clown. That’s all there is to it.

    • Elton Bello

      Lol maybe he wants to be a comedian like the other guy….I have a guy posting with my name lol…go figure

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      He’s the kind of person who’d tell you to spend $700 on a garbage BB device because its so much better but at the same time flames those that buy an iPhone or a Samsung device for similar prices. It’s hypocritical to say the least.

    • Elton Bello

      Sorry to say, but BB sux big time…its a canadian tragedy…i would never buy it…simply has no future….

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      You can’t tell that to these clowns though. They seem to think a company that has less than half a percent market share and dwindling has some sort of future, especially now with a rumoured ‘slider’ phone running Android. I mean big friggin deal! There are enough Android devices out there as it is that are far more appealing than anything Blackberry can produce. It’s a company without any imagination or capability of marketing itself to consumers. It’s Android experiment will flop like every other garbage device they made.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      LOL.. Funny how you both making up stories when I don’t even own a Blackberry since 2009. I am a both iPhone 5s and Android user although android is my daily driver which of course won’t amuse you both. I just love how you both convinced each other so well…..

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid…

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid…

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Find me a link that I encourage people to spend 700 dollars on a Blackberry. LOL

      I never owned a blackberry since 2009 and i will never spend more than 200 dollars on a device that has dead apps.

    • Benny X

      a couple years back I got a like-new Z10 for $200. Which was great, because I thought that’s all they were worth anyhow. It’s amazing it took 2 more years for new Z10’s to finally drop to that price! At the rate they’re going, Blackberry might clear all its stock of Z10’s by 2018!

      I only kept that phone for maybe 4 months, because there weren’t many native apps for it, and its half-baked Android runtime could only run half of the apps out there, at best. Sadly, things have not changed.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid..

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid..

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      I guess you are one of those people that I referred to as WOW WOW WOW
      iPhone is so magical!!!!

    • Elton Bello

      Absolutely not, although cant deny that iphone is the best phone in the market, regarding software and call quality, two things i value most…now I own two android phones, and while I have not tried my Huawei phone coz mobi does not work on it, I find the call quality on nexus 6 not very good…even when i was on bell…for me, iphone remains by far a superior product, having used them from 3gs and up….not the iphone 6 though

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Don’t even buy Nexus phones… they’re shitty. Excuse my french. I had a Nexus 4 and I had a terrible experience with it. I used it for 2 months and gave it away… never use Nexus again.

    • Elton Bello

      I bought it with the only hope that google would update it like it promissed…i had many iphones before and was hoping on updates that were similar, meaning fast and regular. Comparing it to iphone updates, was a dissapointment. The reason why I didnt buy the iphone 6 is because I dont like its current design. For a company that has billions in the bank, I think the design looks like an ipod, and thats why I didnt buy it! If they change it, maybe I will go back.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Actually, I am looking at iPhone 6s but I have this feeling that Apple will eventually increase its screen size to 5 inch. When that happen, I may buy one and use it as my daily driver… We’ll see

    • Elton Bello

      Btw, why did u join that kid from before asking to ban me? Supporting spammers is not a mature thing. Guy made an account with my name on it from yesterday, and after all his comments were deleted, made another one today with again, my name on it.
      You should be ashamed coz that was not serious. Hope it will not happen again!

    • El Capitan Morgan

      I didn’t know it was a spam but it was pretty annoying with those one-liner comment. So that’s what prompted me.

    • Elton Bello

      Well, before calling to ban someone, make your research first. Second, thats how you answer to spammers, 1 line and full of irony. Third, I post with my name on it and not by mimicking to be another person. It was sad to see you join an unhappy kid who posts with my name on it, instead of putting his own name. Thats pathetic. I think you owe me an apology, but bottom line, its up to your conscience.
      As far as the contributing goes, there is a lot of people who dont contribute here, and I am not calling to be banned. It is simply not my right. If you dont like smth, I suggest you ignore it.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Dude, no need to patronize me if you it didn’t go well on your end. I already explained my end and it was pretty unconscious. This is a comment board and I don’t get upset if things didn’t happen well on my end. Things happened and it my case it was an accident. Sure, I should have done my research but I have much more important to do today… Reading articles/making comments is a leisure for me and takes away my stress at work.

      If you go through my previous messages, you may have trolled my comments (unless it was that stupid kid that mimicked you) but its not a big deal… to call for ban, I am sure MS would investigate it before taking action. Again, my action was done unconsciously and the most important thing is you are still here.

      NOTE: I didn’t realize you are that upset. I’ve actually never seen anyone this upset in MS..at least message directly to me.

    • Elton Bello

      I am not upset…this is not a life or death matter…but I was surprised to see your comment. Nevertheless, water under the bridge..

    • danbob333

      Didn’t your shitty phone had a rectangular screen? You should never use a rectangular phone again, clearly, that is your problem.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      LOL… wow that escalated pretty quickly! you didn’t even bother asking my problem with Nexus.

    • danbob333

      No matter what it was. If it’s a software problem then other Android phones shouldn’t be better.
      If it’s a hardware problem then you should only avoid LG. And even then, maybe it’s their only bad phone.
      Nexus phones differ greatly from one manufacturer to another, and from one generation to another.

    • El Capitan Morgan

      I take it that you’re a solid Nexus user? My colleague has Nexus 6 and he is pretty happy about it. I still use an Android device as my daily driver but not a Nexus. I am alright with what I got but thanks for the insight! 🙂

    • framing god

      The nexus 5 was OK, the four was terrible. The six well just overpriced. I’m a Sammy guy and my wife can’t figure out of she’s Sammy or a fruit.

    • Ken Hagen

      Call quality? Any Motorola or Blackberry?

    • Elton Bello

      I have the best possible motorola, Nexus 6. Not very good call quality.

    • Ken Hagen

      Razr hd, Moto x 2013, 2014 are all awesome call quality. Your right though the nexus 6 wasn’t that good, and the Moto x play isn’t any better.

    • Elton Bello

      Damn! Thats bad news for me about the XPlay. Wanted to have one coz of the big battery. Not so sure after this. Call quality is very important for me.

    • Ken Hagen

      It’s not terrible,but its a downgrade from the other Moto x’s in that department.

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Ah shut up and stop insulting iPhone users with such juvenile quips. A lot of professionals use iPhone as well. Are you therefore suggesting ‘simplicity’ is a bad thing? Some of us don’t want slider phones or devices you need the hands of a gorilla to use (eg. BB Passport). You’re a BB fanboy and that’s all there is to it. Arrogant just like the company itself

    • El Capitan Morgan

      Ludwig, there’s a lot of hate in you. Are you an American?

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid….

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Hey asshat

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid………

    • Vito R.

      I disagree. While I prefer to use Android phones I think Apple devices are worth a premium over a competing Samsung flagship for their build quality, functionality (it just works), software updates and warranty support.

    • FlamesFan89

      We will have to agree to disagree on this one. I don’t deny that they are quality devices, but no where near worthy of the price. For the record, I feel the same about other flagships that are close to this price range.

      The companies are charging what the market will bear, so I don’t fault them (I more fault the consumers), but your average person who uses a phone for texting, instant messaging, social networking, perhaps candy crush or something like that, and a calendar is basically throwing their money away so that they can be part of the “me too” society.

      If you truly take a step back, and think about the device in your hand, and what you use it for, you will realize that whether it has a plastic back or a metal one, and whether it has a 400 ppi or a 500 ppi screen, makes almost no material difference in the device. If an app takes 1.3 seconds to load, or 5 seconds, is completely meaningless.

      Wow, I really just got on a bit of a rant there. I’ll stop now.

    • Vito R.

      It would drive me crazy waiting 5 seconds for an app to load – that’s one of the reasons I quickly soured on Windows Phone.

      What’s wrong with technology getting *better* every year? If you don’t need the latest and greatest then last years tech can be had at a discount.

      The price is what it is. Do I wish stuff was cheaper? Of course. But my point still stands – I thinking terms of pricing iPhone is justifiably more expensive than Samsung. If my S6 cost the same as an iPhone 6 I wouldn’t have bought it.

    • northstar17

      I wish we got the Motorola Pure/Style in Canada, it would scare Samsung and Apple here.

    • Eugenio Oliveira

      iOS is a very simple OS. It is good for developers because it is simpler to write programs that will run on this problem.
      The main advantage of the iPhones, IMO, is that Apple controls all, hardware and software. And iPhone’s users get updates faster.
      I would like to buy a more premium phone (build quality) and that has a good camera with vanilla Android. I have a Moto X Play but the build quality is not that good (for the price it is excellent).

    • Mr_Smoosh

      That strength is also its weakness. By controlling everything, there is no room for personalization, or ‘free thinking’. There is only one way to do just about anything. I’m sure that’s a strength for many who just want a device, but for others, it’s a big deal.

    • MassDeduction

      I honestly think that Microsoft straddles the line between the two extremes best. More choice in hardware options/form factors than Apple, more security than Android, more personalization and customization options for OEMs and end-users both than Apple, less fragmentation/more standardization than Android, and better performance on inexpensive hardware than either of them.

      Obviously it hasn’t exactly taken the market by storm yet, but I think it’s for reasons other than those stated above. I think the OS’s design has been excellent.

    • Mr_Smoosh

      I personally think the low adoption of Microsoft is to with availability (in Canada), and the interface just looks ‘too weird’ (tiles vs icons), or reminds folks of Win 8.x which is largely reviled. Hopefully Win 10 gets past all this.

    • framing god

      Can I plagerise your comment. Hit the nail square on the head!

    • Ken

      When you say “The main advantage of the iPhones, IMO, is that Apple controls all, hardware and software.” Do you mean they control which hardware to buy from Samsung?

    • Vito R.

      Who cares where they buy it? They buy hardware from smaller vendors as well.

    • Ken

      Just a funny statement…I guess other phone companies let any throw in the hardware.
      My point is they don’t totally control the hardware…just Apple’s famous speech letting people believe they build it.

    • Vito R.

      Apple designs their CPUs and all custom components. Memory is a commodity and they buy from people other than Samsung. Samsung fabs the CPUs as per Apple design – that’s why their chips are faster and more efficient than Samsungs.

      Besides, everybody know iPhones are assembled in sweatshops in China.

    • ShaBi

      That right there shows how little you know, and how you have no idea what you’re talking about.

    • danbob333

      also Blackberry also control both and they failed. Nokia/Microsoft control both and aren’t doing much better.
      Most example of companies controlling both hardware and software failed. We can add Palm and Samsung (Bada) to that list.

    • PeterC

      If the main advantage of iPhones are that Apple controls both software and hardware, why is it that older iPhones are super slow when they get new iOS updates?

    • Eugenio Oliveira

      They want you to buy a new device …

    • mech986

      love it, the build quality is not that good (for the price it is excellent) – meaning the build quality is not that good, but if the price is cheap enough, then cheap build quality is excellent, i’ll change the way I view the quality.

      Sometimes you do get what you pay for.

    • Eugenio Oliveira

      I don’t understand your comment.

      You can’t expect that a 400$ device will have the same build quality as a 800$ one.

    • Brad Fortin

      Question: What about the screen did you find mediocre? I ask because reviewers, such as the ones over at DisplayMate, found the iPhone 6 Plus screen to be the best LCD on the market, behind only Samsung’s latest AMOLED panels. Second-best doesn’t seem like something most people would consider “mediocre”.

    • josh

      I disagree with the experience. In my experience, the OS has been very smooth, as long as you get upgrades consistently and don’t max out the storage. That said, stock Android is equally smooth and the devices are of much better value. Because Android OEMs have tons of competition, they stay competitively priced and they try to out-gimmick each other, which is fun. If you prefer iOS, you’re stuck with whatever Apple tells you to buy.

  • jellmoo

    Despite claims of “garbage specs” by the vocal minority of Android fans that take delight in their Apple bashing, the iPhone lineup has always been a performance beast, and this gen seems no different. (I say this as an Android user that swaps been a Note 4 and Nexus 5 as my daily driver).

    That being said, I just can’t get behind the pricing of the iPhone. Paying $1,000 for 16GB of non expandable storage is wacky to me. The premium being paid by Canadians goes beyond just the weak dollar, and is too much for me to swallow (though I’d also say that recent Samsung offerings have also been over priced, though not to this level). There’s just too many compelling devices out there at 1/3 to 1/2 the price of the iPhone 6s for me to seriously consider shelling out that much money.

    • It’s Me

      You’re right, the pricing is crazy here. But the Canadian premium, beyond the exchange rate, is about $40 on the base model. Sorry to see any Canadian premium at all, but $40 is hardly noticeable in light of the FX amount.

    • jellmoo

      You’re right, it’s not huge, but it’s definitely noticeable. I think it stands out a bit simply because Tim Cook having made a point about no price increase with the latest batch of devices. At the end of the day it doesn’t really matter, but that is money that could be used for a case, a dock or an extra cable.

    • marshallpower

      If it’s that noticeable to me, then it’s a 40$ steal directly in your pockets. There is no reason to charge that much more even if you are Apple.

    • Eugenio Oliveira

      I would not mind to try a new iPhone. I tried a 5S recently, but I returned because the screen was just too small. The problem is that for 500$ plus a contract … it is just … no, thank you.
      I think that the hype on Smartphones is going down and that is the reason why companies like Samsung and Apple are increasing a lot their prices.

    • It’s Me

      The hype may indeed be slowing down. The market may be close to saturation. But it’s difficult to say that is causing price increase, because they aren’t really raising prices. The iPhone and others, are prices in US dollars and those prices largely remain unchanged. But in countries like Canada, where our dollar experienced one of the largest and fastest drops in history relative to the USD, it results in a price in increase in our currency.

    • Vito R.

      It’s actually the opposite – manufacturers like Samsung are LOWERING their prices because their phones aren’t selling as well as they hoped.

    • sggodsell

      The specs of the IPhone had to be bumped up on both the processor and ram, because of Apples Swift. Swift sucked monkey balls on what was current gen iOS hardware, which included the iPhone 6/6+.

    • jellmoo

      That hasn’t been my experience at all. Swift has been fine on current gen hardware. Performance wise it outpaces Unity, though it loses out big time at building out cross platform.

      Granted, I’m not a coder, I’m a project manager and I’m relying on the feedback of my team and the overall performance our builds show.

    • sggodsell

      Sure you can use objective-c, c, and Swift in your app. But the whole premise of Swift was to utilize its existing developers to make Swift apps that would work on both iOS, and OS/X, otherwise why introduce or use Swift in the first place. You may as well continue the way your were making apps using obj-c. Remember the Swift runtime can take a 100% Swift app and run it on all of Apples platforms. Oh, and it is slow on the iPhone 6/6+.

    • Brad Fortin

      You keep saying that but like I brought up last time the articles and benchmarks you’re referring to use unoptimized code on older versions of Swift. Newer versions of Swift with optimized code benchmark 5x-35x faster than Obj-C code.

      You also mention (later in the comments) that Swift apps are made to work on both iOS and OS X but I don’t think it works the way you think it does. Swift code can run on both OSes but apps made with Swift aren’t cross-platform. Sure, you can re-use some of the same Swift code on both platforms but you can’t compile a single app that runs on both platforms (… yet). For example, if you’re not making your own custom interface you’d have to use each platform’s Interface Builder, making each app incompatible with the other platform. Not only that but at compile time Xcode only lets you choose if you’re targeting OS X or iOS, there’s no option to target both platforms. In the future you might be able to write a single universal app that runs on iPhones, iPads, and Macs, similar to what you can do with Windows 10 apps, but we’re not there yet.

  • kaostheory

    Does it recognize the actual level of force or just two, hard and soft?

    • It’s Me

      It’s measures the force. In the draw demos they showed the amount of pressure would adjust the thickness of the brush strokes.

    • Mitchell Palmater

      it’s called 3D because there are 3 dimensions.
      tap, soft touch, and hard touch.

    • 7777777

      wrong, at the keynote they used 3D Touch for zooming in a shooter, stepless.
      The homescreen and apps that aren’t games usually use these 3 possibilities

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  • jroc

    The pricing is totally ridiculous. That said, I bought one. I was able to sell my 64gb iPhone 6 for $800 on kijiji so the price to “upgrade” for me is minimal. I consider it a wash due to the fact that my plan is only $60/month and something similar would be over $100/month (6gb of data) with an in market plan with a tab.

    Hopefully it won’t disappoint, time will tell.

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  • Steve Rodrigue

    When I read 3+ hours recharge time because Apple does not provide a powerful charger with a 1000$ phone!?!?!?! A powerful charger would have cut profit by a few cents (maybe 1$) and everyone would be happier! I don’t understand this “compromise”.

    • neo905

      Tim Cook is a bean counter not a visionary like Steve Jobs. He will extract every penny he can from his loyal base and he knows he can….for now…

    • Steve Rodrigue

      They will do it for a while. Apple user base is very devoted to the company. They’ll give their money and they will not ask questions.

    • neo905

      It’s like Apple users have consumer culture version of Stockholm Syndrome.

  • RagnarokNCC

    The price makes it very clear that this phone is not for me, no matter what I might think of it. I’d consider it in a couple years when we’re all talking about how the 6S is still a viable option against the 7S and the price has dropped a little.*

    *(“Outrageous! The 7S is $650 on a 2-year and it ONLY has 32Gb! I’d expect at least 64 because the new 3D Motion Pics take up so much room! They just want you to buy icloud!” “Well the 6S is only $200 on contract and doesn’t require you submit a blood sample to Apple like the 7” “Yeah but the screen is made of diamondium…” etc.)

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  • JTon

    Dan, what does 3D touch feel like. Does it click exactly like the Macbook touch pad? When does this happen?

    • There’s no click. It’s just a press with a few different levels of sensitivity.

    • JTon

      Are you sure? What’s with all the comparisons to Force Touch then

    • Yup! I’ve played with it. No clicky feel. Just a haptic vibration to let you know the touch has been registered.

  • ET

    This is just my opinion ( which i’m sure no one cares about) But I am kind of bored with the whole smartphone arms race ever since the iPhone 5s. I do wish I had the larger screen, but my 5s has a decent camera, ok battery and no real reason to pay $600 to upgrade and to pay Rogers more money for the same plan.

    • MassDeduction

      It’s not an either/or. The 5S has held it’s value relatively well. Stay on your grandparented plan, buy a used iPhone 6 from someone who just had to have the 6S, and sell your 5S to someone in need. That won’t change your plan at all, and will cost you less than $600.

      If the larger screen isn’t worth that, then continue to enjoy your 5S. Talk about what your carrier would or wouldn’t do just muddies the beautiful BYOD water, though. 🙂

    • HelloCDN

      iPhone 5s is a great device, and I think it was Apple’s best iPhone (“yet”….)

  • Elton Bello

    For those who still were not sure, this confirms that the new iphone has 2gb ram…

  • Karl Dagenais

    I’m so torn about Iphones… I love their build quality, love that they get instant OS updates (just waited 3 months for Canadian carriers to release 5.1.1 on my S6, ugh), long lasting software support, in-store same day hardware support, generally better designed apps… Oh, and that resale value is amazing!

    On the other hand, they’re crazy expensive, iOS is too locked down (can’t run kodi because apple doesn’t want me to?), haven’t had decent amounts of ram before now, and multitasking still isn’t up to pay with Android… Even sharing between apps is still far from being what it should be, although apple introduced extensibility or whatever they called it last year. Oh, and 16gb is a JOKE!

    Got the S6 this year because there was finally an android phone with a camera as good or better as Iphones, I’m generally happy with it, but waiting months for our carriers to update it pissed me off. Also, if it breaks, I have to send it to a repair center and wait for weeks, that reeks compared to apple’s service.

    Edit. BTW, good review, but I’d prefer if you didn’t point out apples advantages compared to Samsung all the time while never mentioning Samsung’ advantages when iPhone had a weakness (ie battery life). Either compare them, or don’t. Otherwise you sound fanboy-ish.

    • Elton Bello

      I thought kodi is downloadable for IOS fron their website….

    • Karl Dagenais

      Don’t know. Probably requires a jailbreak or some workaround. Replace with popcorn time… Or any torrent app that’s on the play store.

    • Vito R.

      My S6 on Bell still hasn’t gotten the 5.1 upgrade.

    • Karl Dagenais

      Exactly my point! Got it from xda and then recently got the bootloader to get fingerprint back…

      Shouldn’t have to do that

    • thereasoner

      Strange, my Telus GS6 has had it for 2 weeks now! Can’t stand either Rogers or Bell personally.

    • Vito R.

      Yeah, they did release the update but they pulled it because of an issue.

    • thereasoner

      Personally I’m not put off by Android update schedules, by the time you get them most of the bugs are usually worked out. I missed all the initial problems Nexus users had when Lollipop first came out and while it took HTC just over 3 months to get it on my M7 the wait was worth it and I got a more stable/bug free 5.0.2 version.

      Even iOS users are starting to catch on and more and more are waiting before updating now after the buggy mess that was iOS 8. Now iOS 9 is having its own stability problems and many people are waiting for a bug free version before they update, a wise move imo! After all, what good is it to have the updates first if the experience is so bad?

  • Meffaliss

    First thought.
    JEEZ, that retail pricing! At slightly above 1K, it makes this phone seriously unappealing unless you can sell your previous phone to cover some of the cost.

    Otherwise, it personally doesn’t feel like a huge upgrade compared to the regular 6 and 6+ and is certainly not worth the price.

  • Ken

    Wow if this was any other phone in 2015 with 1080p and 720p screen you wouldn’t even be able to get pass that…every sentence would remind us of that. Nothing special here and not worth the money.

    • Vito R.

      I would rather my S6 had a 720p screen and better battery life. Everything is a compromise but adding pixels that you can’t differentiate seems like a waste of resources to me.

    • neo905

      The problem is the 6S is 720P display and still shyte battery life. Keeping that resolution and making an already small battery smaller at 1,715 mAh isn’t a compromise. That’s a fail.

    • Vito R.

      The iPhone’s screen resolution is perfect for its display size. The battery life of the iPhone 6S is about the same as last year’s phone. The Galaxy S6 – despite having a battery 50% larger than the iPhone 6S – has a significantly shorter battery life than both iPhones and the Galaxy S5.

    • neo905

      How do you know it’s the same? You don’t have the phone. You can’t just base it on what Apple says. They have exaggerated battery life all the way back to the iPhone 4. Besides, even if it is the same as the iphone 6, that is still crappy. The 6+ is good though. They should be making the battery life better though, not the same.

      Besides that, why is it taking over 3 hours to charge that puny battery. You gonna spin on that as well? It’s bad enough they don’t have fast charging but they couldn’t provide something better. No, cheaped out there to save pennies.

    • Vito R.

      Daniel reviewed it and said it was the same. Read other reviews and see if they differ on battery performance.

      It takes 3hrs to full because it’s a tiny charger. Also, most people charge their phones overnight. Most Android phones don’t include the quick charger either :/

    • neo905

      Right. Daniel said it was mediocre battery life. That means not good. Just like previous models. And my 2,600 mAh battery without quick charge is about 3 hours. The same for a 1,715 mAh is bad. They include a crappy low voltage charger. They could have given a better one like the iPad gets. They are asking considerably more for the iPhone than an iPad. They are just being cheap.

    • Vito R.

      Hahaha. I don’t know what you’re whining about. The should include a case and screen protect too.

    • neo905

      Actually it’s iPhone owners that have been whining about it for years now and Apple is too arrogant to listen and apparently you are to ignorant to acknowledge it.

    • Vito R.

      Whining about what? How their batteries last longer than equivalent Android devices with bigger batteries? How their phones take soooo long to charge? Haha. Yeah, that’s something every iPhone owner complains about.

      What phone do you have that didn’t come with a quick charger?

    • neo905

      So they finally make the phone heavier and thicker and fail to make the battery bigger because they would rather fill it with gimmicks than extend battery life. Besides the half life on iPhone batteries are atrocious. Sure, in the beginning you marvel at how much juice they squeeze out of that tiny battery. Then you realize just over a year later it’s shortcomings. The M7 I had on the other hand had the same or better battery life than when I bought it and it was never a lagging device. Blah blah blah. Android this. Apple that. They both have their shortcomings. Fact is, you are allowed fewer of them when your phone is the equivalent of a mortgage payment.

    • Vito R.

      Why is it a gimmick? 3D Force Touch is great by all accounts. I had an M7 – it was actually called the HTC One. I bought it because they sold one as a “Developer Edition”. My biggest complaint was that camera was terrible – only 4 or 5 megapixels and didn’t take great pics. That’s the problem work Android devices – generally not as good all around as iPhone. The Galaxy S6 is as close as they can get – but battery life sucks, Samsung’s skin is terrible and I’m not hopeful about getting updates – still don’t have 5.1. The hardware is really nice though and the camera is fantastic – and is cheaper than iPhone!

    • neo905

      I agree. I ended up with the dreaded purple tint. Like I said, Android isn’t perfect and neither is IOS. It has its shortcomings as well that I can’t go back to unless they open it up more. Which they won’t and I hate iTunes with a passion and their cloud is too restrictive and not user friendly at all and still too expensive. Plus that price though. If I lived in the US at least the price is comparable but not anywhere else in the world. I like the direction Motorola is going. Samsung I hate touch Wiz to but they are trying to be too much like an iPhone. LG4 is a good all around package. Their software isn’t the best either. I guess we will have to see what the new Nexus brings to the table. The beauty is there is choice and there are compromise for each and to each their own. I just think a company sitting on $120 billion can really start pushing the envelope again and not do things that just improve their bottom line and jack the price up. Problem is Timmy is a bean counter not a visionary like Jobs was.

    • Vito R.

      The Galaxy S6 is good enough for me right now. Nexus phones always have crappy battery life and terrible cameras – I would be surprised if the new ones are any different – they don’t want to make them too good to compete with their partners. They have great software though.

    • neo905

      Hawaeii is my dark horse. Their phones are really well made. Good cameras and battery life and their fingerprint sensors are as good as iphones. The hardware is also solid. It was their software that sucked. That won’t be the issue now since it is stock Android. The renders make me doubt it. But all renders looks like crap taken by a 90’s flip phone.

    • jroc

      Perfect. It’s 9:00pm and my iPhone 6 has 81% battery left and I took it off the charger at 7:15am this morning. Not everyone spends every waking second on their phone. If it lasts me a full day with my usage then I’m happy. I’m sure the 6s will.

    • neo905

      Congratulations. Even Android 6.0 phones have great standby times at this point. It’s called doze. Heck even 5.1 phones have that. Point is it is a commodized market place now and even mid level phones are decent these days. Samsung finally stepped up their build quality and software platforms are just mushing in the middle and stealing features from each other. Plus, the rate of real change is slowing and none of the OEMs phone so far this year are really that exciting. To charge $300-500 more than your competition you can’t just be satisfied with “batteries the same as it was last year” and be content as that’s just complacent and lazy and the reason why they get away with it in the first place.

    • jroc

      But if they’re going for a battery that lasts a day, and they get that I don’t see the big deal. Not everyone needs a phone to last for an entire weekend. Maybe you’re not happy with that, but clearly the people that want/have iPhones don’t mind.

    • neo905

      Iphone users, and I was one at one time, don’t have an issue with the battery at first. The problem is iPhone batteries degrade must faster over time. Part of it is due to the small and now smaller battery. The other part of it is that there batteries aren’t very good. They want you buying a new phone every two years. My iPhone after the first year starting going downhill, by the 2nd year it was half of what it was at the beginning.

    • jroc

      I’m sure there are cases out there, but there’s also times when it’s fine after a while. My buddy still has his iPhone 5 and doesn’t have any issues. Personally I’ve never owned one for more than a year, so I’ve never seen it happen personally.

    • Well funny since the IPhone 6 or 6s don’t have great battery life. Did you read the reviews?

    • Vito R.

      Agreed, battery life isn’t “great”, it’s just average. Not many thin phones have great battery life. It’s better than my Galaxy S6 but not as good as my Xperia Z3 Compact.

    • Pigs Can Fly

      My S5 has great battery life but my Moto X(2014) has phenomenal battery life, probably the best one so far, my original HTC Desire had abysmal battery life (even just leaving it in pocket all day it fell below 40% by 4pm). My wife’s iPhone 4 had really bad battery life, she had to charge it twice a day sometimes- she now has a Lumia 830 and it’s above average battery life.

    • Vito R.

      I didn’t find the Moto X to have very good battery life relative to the S5. The Galaxy S5 has a battery that’s about 20% bigger and a newer, more efficient display compared to the Moto while the CPUs are the same. Like for like usage wouldn’t result in Moto X having a better battery life – this was also the conclusion of every review I read. I don’t remember the battery life of my iPhone 4, but it was definitely not any worse than the competing smartphones of the time – but obviously not as long lasting as a Blackberry Curve.

      I’m actually *really* surprised at all the iPhone 4/4s I still see around – the iPhone 4 is 5 years old! Don’t see many people with a 3 year old Android, let alone a 4 or 5 year old device. That’s a pretty good testament to their longevity. My Nexus 5 is two years old and the battery barely lasts 2hrs of use…

    • Brad Fortin

      You talk about screen resolution as if it’s the only spec that matters for a screen. Brightness? Contrast? Colour accuracy? Visibility in sunlight? Viewing angles? Energy consumption? Screens have lots of specs other than resolution.

  • Techguru86

    That’s definitely Apple for you, take features everyone has had for years and make it as it is the next big thing, M7 had lZoe for 2 years now and still does much more then the Iphone camera, $900 for a mediocre battery life is just a rip off and should be told as such in the media, I work in the industry and IOS is nothing that great, Android and BB10 have had the same features for quite some-time now. Moto X Play is definitely the best option for high end device without high end price tag. Note 5 and Blackberry Venice Android will mop the floor with these guys.

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Blackberry 10 is a piece of shjt and so are their phones You seriously think a ‘slider phone’ with keys is going to ‘mop the floor”? Get real pal.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid…..

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Come up with new material. You’re boring me

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid……….

    • barrist

      The difference is when Apple implements these features, they take hold in the mainstream while the ones that did it first fail (e.g. Zoe). I wouldn’t be surprised if Instagram , facebook, etc will have support for Live Photos.

      Nobody talks about the fingerprint reader on the Motorola Atrix; since TouchID was released on an iPhone, the Android implementations after now seem like the ones playing catch up.

      On what planet will a Blackberry Slider phone “mop the floor” against an iPhone?

    • Techguru86

      A Nexus type software experience with some of BB10 best features, Blackberry encrypting android is a win for Google over IOS and after the amazing battery life of the Passport and newer devices and adding in a touch sensitive keyboard with full Google support is a breath of fresh air and something different on the market unlike HTC, Apple and Samsung products now and maybe quick updates like a nexus device.

    • thereasoner

      Zoe never failed, neither did drop down notifications, voice assistants, native maps app, larger HD screens or any of the dozens of other hardware or software feature that Apple has copied from the competition over the years!

      The BS that Apple perfects everything it copies from the competition is pure myth, more often than not Apples version is worse in its implementation or buggy as heck !

    • mech986

      You mean like Samsung Pay (er, LoopPay), Google buying the Android OS way back when, Microsoft buying DOS, etc? When the company you like finds a great technology and buys/licenses it, you say great business decision, when the competition does it, you say, Fail, they didn’t do it first or themselves. If a company is big enough, and smart enough to find or buy another company and integrate its products into their own, that’s called business acumen. There have been plenty of failures at it (re: Microsoft:Nokia, HP:Palm, HP:Compaq).

    • thereasoner

      My wife got the Moto X Play on Koodo and I got a free Moto 360 smart watch as well, what great deal !! The phone is impressive considering what you pay for it, both my wife and I really like it. That said, the speed and camera among other things are so much better on my Galaxy S6. The extra cost was worth it for me but my wife is happy with the Moto….and a few hundred dollars savings in her pocket.

  • iPwn8599

    1100 for a phone?

    • jroc

      Wrong comment.

  • LudwigVanBeethoven

    People keep yammering on about pricing but here’s the thing. You can probably still sell a used iPhone or trade it in for a few hundred which would make the contract price for a new model less than $300 overall. Bottom line is that people complaining about pricing are just doing so because they can and want to. Apple bashers galore but if this was Blackberry these same doooshbags would be telling you to go run out and buy that. lol

    • Vito R.

      Check out resale values or year old iPhones vs year old Android devices. iPhones hold their value much better than the competition. But they are still very expensive haha.

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Sure they are but you can still sell an iPhone 6 today for over $500 so any price you pay on contract is negated by doing so. People still complain however because they got nothing better to do.

    • Vito R.

      You are absolutely correct.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid…….

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Back at ya īdiot

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid………..

    • You know you’re paying for your phone anyway, on contract or not? You want to pay $1000 for a phone because you think you can sell it in a year for $500? Okay you go ahead. Still too expensive for me.

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      It’s about personal choice and the means to buy the device.

    • I have the means. Still not worth it. And well, I could never use or buy an Apple device but I simply don’t buy flagship phones. Just don’t see the point but I can understand that people do.

    • thereasoner

      Most of the complaints I’m sure are directed at the 16 GB model as the base, it’s pure greed for Apple to do that. Start at 32 GB like most all other OEMs and people who need more than 16 GB won’t be forced to pay an extra $130. Heck, even this reviewer has it listed as a con because it is!

    • thereasoner

      I did that comparison once on ebay and I found the prices very similar. When the used iPhone was more expensive it was mostly because it cost more to begin with, usually the storage upgrade.

      Personally I’ve never had a problem getting a decent price on Kijiji for my old flagship quality Androids, they’ve always sold for comparable prices to that of the iPhone.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid……

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Hey îdiot

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid…………

    • LudwigVanBeethoven

      Hey you corn holed loser.

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid,

    • HarpersMafia

      Hey stupid

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  • Socius

    That single core performance bump is amazing. I can’t wait till Friday. I love my 6 Plus…but the 1gb ram is annoying when it comes to browsing/tabs/etc…the only complaint I guess I have is with the 12mp camera and low light performance.

  • Brad Fortin

    Minor correction, Dan:

    1080p60 video debuted in the iPhone 6. The iPhone 6S bumps it up to 1080p120 (which puts it in the Record Slo-Mo settings).

  • Alexander Wyatt

    Please learn to edit dialogue. VERY amateur mistakes were made…stuttering in three places. WHY?! Just retake the sentence and edit it together.

  • 1messager

    Iphones don’t make people dream anymore, they are now boring.

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  • Pigs Can Fly

    Know what’s sad? I’m more interested in upcoming Windows10 phones than this.

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  • Politically Incorrect Liberal

    iPhone 6S. Once again Apple continues to meet the need of the narcissistic selfie generation.

    • mech986

      Their money is just as good as old guys, and this is coming from an old guy. Besides, every phone comes now with a front facing camera, something that most stand alone cameras can’t do.

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  • Bill

    I would take LG G4 or HTC M8, M9 over samsung product everytime.

    • thereasoner

      I switched from the excellent HTC ONE M7 to my new Galaxy S6. Samsung has really improved TouchWiz, I have a substantially better experience over the old TouchWiz on the GS3 I once owned. The GS6 is just the best Android phone out right now imo but that’s not to say that the other flagships aren’t really nice.

      That’s the beauty of Android, so many great choices to me made for a phone. Heck, even some of the midrange devices these days are quite good if you don’t have to have the bests features.

  • outstanding. good for apple

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  • KS

    Regarding GPU performance, could you update on Kishonti benchmarks which is widely used in mobile environment? For example, GFX2.7(T-Rex), GFX3.0, GFX3.1 and coming GFX4.0.

  • Thanks for the good review Daniel! Looking forward to receiving it on Friday and test it also on Mac Aficionados. When it comes to the battery, how long did it really last on a daily usage? As far as I’m concerned I know the Samsung smartphones also don’t last at all…

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  • Tootall

    I think it was the apple fanboiz that highly criticized BlackBerry for not using the start button and how would you ever get around a OS by swiping!!!! Wow apple you have done a fantastic taking all BlackBerry technology and bringing it into ios9. BlackBerry has over 300 patents on force touch from 2007. We have BlackBerry peak. We have BlackBerry flow. It is an interesting device. I am sure once all the apps get adjusted to it will help a lot. And please no need to bash BlackBerry this is my opinion I just like sharing the BS all the tech reviewers gave BlackBerry and now apple is using it!! I am wondering how a lot of corporations are implementing iphones at the prices they are? That’s why I see more android for business now.

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  • Jerry

    Great review Dan, even though I am not a fan of the iPhone, I thought you did an excellent job on reviewing it objectively and comparing it to the competition.

  • squiddy20

    Yeah, because Samsung always put their own parts in their own phones, and never used parts from other sources. Get a life and learn something for a change. It’s cheaper for Apple to outsource the parts manufacturing to other entities. Pretty sure that’s taught in Business 100.

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  • thereasoner

    “I’d recommend spending the extra $130 to get the 64 GB version “.

    ….and there in a nutshell is the answer to why Apple won’t start off at 32 GB while most of the competition does. Pure undiluted greed plain and simple !

    • Brad Fortin

      Your username is “thereasoner”, doesn’t it stand to reason that Apple would know if its average 16 GB user needs more than 16 GB? After all, they have the usage statistics for hundreds of millions of iPhones.

      It’s more likely that they saw most 16 GB users were fine with that amount and it was the power users with 32 GB and 64 GB who were always filling up their device, so they decided to double those storage options at the same price.

    • thereasoner

      Are you saying that Apple invades users privacy and tracks how much space people use up on their phones? I mean apps and music would be easy to track I suppose seeing that it’s itunes/app store related but users personal photos and videos are being tracked by Apple as well?

      That is a startling revelation! Well at least Apple doesn’t bother the user with the burden of making their own choice to save $130 AND get 16 GB of extra on board storage like other OEM’s do, that would be truly criminal!

    • Brad Fortin

      It’s not an invasion of privacy to track storage usage. They’re not going through your photos one at a time, they’re looking at the available storage space. How you can make the leap from “looking at available storage” to “going through each and every personal photo and video” I have no idea. Seems like fear mongering to me.

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  • Harley Davis

    Geez…as a completely unbiased end user (I use an Android phone and an Apple iPad, just before that I used an iPhone and an Android tablet) this review was hard to read. The unadulterated iFanboy bias was just festering and boiling over in almost every segment. The reviewer was constantly boasting in subtle and not so subtle ways about how this iPhone is soooo much better than ‘Android’, as if Android was a single tangible thing instead of the OS that many different devices from many different manufacturers use for many different things. I like phones. The operating system is only one part of a phone. I like reviews that objectively analyze the pros and cons of all the parts of phones. I do not like this review.

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  • jay

    Price sucks

  • Every time you see those antenna bands, a homeless man kills a puppy.

    • Brad Fortin

      But is the puppy also homeless?

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  • David Monkman

    I’m surprised a phone with only a dual core CPU and 2GB of RAM, is on par and above Samsungs Octocore CPU with 4GB of RAM, in terms of raw performance, I’m impressed.

  • Dion Kerfont

    What annoys me about Apple ads is the fact that they market their new features as if they invented them. Surprised that they didn’t call the 3D touch feature “iTouch”. NFC was heavily touted as a must-have on the new iPhone 6… despite the fact that Blackberries had it 3 years ago. Yeah, they’re good phones, but they are way overpriced for what you get. The only thing that keeps these phones selling is marketing… because the innovation just isn’t there anymore.

    • Brad Fortin

      Apple never touted NFC as a feature on the iPhone 6. What they touted (in the US) was Apple Pay, which happens to use NFC, but they never even mentioned the NFC part.

      “The only thing that keeps these phones selling is marketing…”

      Marketing brings people through the door once. Good products keep people coming back for more.

      Funny that you think “the innovation just isn’t there anymore” even though you just mentioned 3D Touch, one of the biggest innovations in smartphone interaction since capacitive multitouch screens.

    • Dion Kerfont

      Semantics. Since, like you said, Apple Pay requires NFC (something Apple never had in their products before), it can be said they highly touted it as if they invented it… when in reality anyone paying attention realizes this simply isn’t true. So Apple gets its customers to keep paying that Apple tax on this “revolutionary new feature”. It’s funny how most people hold other companies to task for overcharging their customers… yet Apple maintains brand loyalty despite the fact they do exactly that. Why the hell should Apple be so special?

    • Domino67

      Why the hell should Apple be so special?……It’s a cult.

    • Brad Fortin

      They didn’t tout NFC as if they invented it, they touted what they did invent: Apple Pay. They didn’t even mention NFC because they didn’t think it was important, and they never claimed to have invented it like you keep saying.

      The people who think Apple “overcharges” for their products are the people who tend not to buy them. The people who do buy the products, however, don’t find them overpriced. That’s the whole definition of being overpriced: Priced too high for the value. Obviously Apple has hundreds of millions of customers who *don’t* find their products overpriced. If those people thought the products were overpriced they wouldn’t be customers. Instead they find that Apple delivers a value that’s worth the price.

      Apple is “so special” because there’s no other company in the world that does what they do. There are companies that make similar products that compete with Apple’s products on the lower-end of the market but no companies that deliver the same complete hardware + software + support package. They’re treated differently because they *are* different.

    • Dion Kerfont

      Sorry… I just don’t see 3D touch as all that revolutionary.

    • Brad Fortin

      And there’s plenty of CEOs who didn’t see the iPhone as revolutionary, which is part of the reason those people aren’t CEOs anymore.

    • mech986

      And their companies withered and died or were sold off, see Nokia, Motorola, HTC, and what’s left of Blackberry.

    • Brad Fortin

      HTC’s still around. Are you thinking of Palm?

    • mech986

      HTC reported a 250 million dollar loss last quarter. LG reported it sold 8 million LTE smartphones last quarter, best ever result for them on the heels of their G4, spending a lot of money in marketing it – but they netted 200 million won (or $172,000), about 1.2 cents per phone profit! Luckily, their appliance division helped them though.

      How can Android makers survive with no profits?

    • Brad Fortin

      They can’t. They seem to be headed in the same direction as the PC market: A race to the bottom. There only seems to be one exception, and it’s a company that doesn’t feel the need to brag about specs.

  • framing god

    I agree. IPhone and Mac are easier cause they just do less. Can’t live without me back button, proper version of swiftkey and the native Gmail app. I’ll have to see @ some point if I can live with a phone without a removable battery.

    On a side note I think this review almost looks like bgr (I haven’t read) and the verge I (have read). Although more in depth it’s so positive it feels like supported content. Either Dan really feels this way or he’s getting some wicked brownies to give him the extra umph.

  • jay

    I got the iPhone 6s Plus on Friday. I paid 1340$ for it and on my way home I thought that I can buy a nice gaming computer for that money.
    I opened the box and start playing around with it and I would say there is no reason to upgrade. Better camera or forced touch? There is really no reason. Is a nice iPhone but the price. I don’t think that apple sold a lot iPhones here in Canada because when I returned it there were still phones available to buy.

    • mech986

      It isn’t for everyone. But check back into the store and see how many they’ve sold, and keep in inventory, it would be an interesting statistic.

    • jay

      They getting shipments every day

  • mech986

    Samsung builds the A9 along with Taiwan Semi, but it’s completely designed by Apple and built to their specs and QC. As for the rest, sure, they find or push development of products by others who specialize in those parts – virtually no one in the phone business can build all of the parts well, till the GS6, Samsung was using Qualcomm processors. Samsung’s overall profits have declined 7 quarters in a row, held up only by their Semiconductor division, helped immensely by being able to build and sell the Apple designed A9 to Apple, that’s a co-dependentcy, but one they need, otherwise they’d be in much worse shape.

  • jay

    On my back to the Apple Store bringing my iPhone back. Don’t see a reason for the upgrade. Force touch is awesome but not so much support right now. Camera I can’t see the difference that I need to upgrade but one thing I noticed that the iOS 9 runs slower on my iPhone 6. Is that a surprise?

  • Longtin

    If the price was cheaper I’d have no problems with this device, just can’t justify the price when the exact same if not better is available for $49 or $149 on a 2yr.

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