iPhone SE review: A 4-inch potent blend of old and new

One thing is clear about Apple’s iPhone SE – it’s for people who like small smartphones.

A few hours into using the SE I quickly realized the smartphone is not designed for my personal taste in mobile devices – but that’s okay. There is clearly a small, but vocal audience clamouring for Apple’s latest pint-size device considering Apple sold 30 million 4-inch iPhones in 2015.

The significant question is how large the market for a 4-inch smartphone really is, and given Apple’s reluctance to release individual device sales statistics, we’ll likely never know. But just off hand, I can think of a number of friends and acquaintances who feel today’s modern smartphone market consists of handsets far too large for their taste.

This point is even more apparent in Apple’s iOS ecosystem where fans of smaller devices have, until now, had no option available to them when it comes to a 4-inch device (unless they opted for the aged iPhone 5 or 5s that is). This particular audience likely felt alienated by the release of the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s.

iphonese-4
While I was initially skeptical of giant 5-inch plus smartphones, I now consider myself a believer in the added functionality extra screen real-estate provides. Yes, I’m a fan of “phablets,” though I still loathe the classification.

Apple iPhone SE specs

  • iOS 9.3
  • 2GB RAM
  • A9 processor
  • 4.0-inch display (1136 x 640 resolution, 326 ppi)
  • 16/64GB internal storage
  • 12 megapixel iSight camera capable of shooting 4K at a resolution of 3840 x 2160
  • 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera
  • Three-axis gyro sensor, as well as accelerometer, proximity sensor and ambient light sensor
  • Wi-Fi calling, NFC, VoLTE, Bluetooth 4.2, Fingerprint sensor
  • 123.8 x 58.6 x 7.6 mm, 113 grams
  • LTE connectivity, WiFi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi‑Fi
  • 16GB: $579 (CAD) unlocked, 64GB: $709 (CAD) unlocked.
  • Colour options: Space Grey, Silver, Gold and Rose Gold.

iPhone 6s in an iPhone 5s body

iphonesecomparison
What you’ve heard is true, the iPhone SE is essentially the iPhone 6s in the body of an iPhone 5s. This means the 6s’ powerful A9 chipset, along with its M9 motion-tracking processor, and 2GB of RAM, are packed into the SE’s tiny 4-inch chassis.

Also, it’s worth pointing out that the SE still utilizes a 1136 x 640 pixel resolution, the same glass featured in the iPhone 5s. Because of this, however, the phone actually feels snappier than the 6s, especially when multitasking between applications and navigating through iOS 9’s various features. I would even go so far as to say that the SE could be the most responsive smartphone I’ve ever used.

On the other hand, this move is also a disappointment considering Apple’s other iPhone offerings have moved beyond this outdated resolution to 1334 x 750 pixels. While it may not sound like it on paper, the difference in sharpness is noticeable, even to those not accustomed to picking up on screen resolution-related minutia.

iphonesecomparison-2
With Apple obviously recycling many components from the 5s for the SE, increasing the smartphone’s screen resolution should have been a top priority for Apple, but has been blatantly omitted.

Another notable hardware shift the SE when compared to the 6s is the smartphone’s lack of 3D Touch, though during my time with the SE I haven’t missed Apple’s Peek and Pop feature. For whatever reason, the ability to view what is present in an app before actually opening it, has never integrated its way into my daily use of the 6s.

iphonese-7
In terms of other upgrades, the SE also features faster LTE/Wi-Fi when compared to the 5s, as well as Apple Pay functionality. Perhaps most importantly given the recent controversy surrounding security and Apple, the SE also features the additional Touch ID security chip present in Apple’s more recently released smartphones

Then there’s the SE’s battery, which is slightly larger at 1642 mAh compared to 1560 mAh. While the SE’s increase in battery size is nearly non-existent over the 5s, I frequently experienced over 12 hours of battery life with the smartphone. This, however, is likely the result of improved software efficiency present in iOS 9.3 over iOS 6.0 and 7.0, rather than the tiny battery size increase. Still, it Apple including a larger battery in the SE would have been a welcome addition to the smartphone

iphoneseinhand
Other technical specifications, most notably the SE’s camera, remain identical to the iPhone 6s, though its worth pointing out the 4-inch smartphone does not feature the image stabilization present in the iPhone 6s Plus — though neither does the iPhone 6s, for that matter. On the plus side, the dreaded camera bump present on the iPhone 6 and 6s isn’t included in the SE, resulting in a smooth rear backing.

This means that the SE features the same superb 12-megapixel f/2.2 aperture shooter (with 4K video capabilities) and 1.2 megapixel front-facing camera as the iPhone 6s. Furthermore, in my tests the iPhone SE’s photo quality is identical to the iPhone 6s’.

Almost Identical

iphonese-thebest
Even in terms of of aesthetic, the SE looks nearly identical to the almost three-year-old 5s. The two subtle differences between the devices consist of the expected SE logo present on the rear of the device, and the matte chamfers running around the smartphone’s flat edges, giving the SE’s now old school design a much-needed dose of more modern sensibilities. The phone also comes in Apple’s popular Rose Gold colour, a variant the 5s was not available in.

Whether or not the iPhone SE’s overall look will appeal to you comes down to your own individual taste. Those who, like myself, prefer Apple’s more recent curved approach to the iPhone, will likely feel the SE’s form factor is dated.

There is, however, an audience out there that, similar to the size issue discussed earlier, isn’t fond of Apple’s shift from the 5s’ more angular build. Again, if you fall into this camp, Apple’s latest flagship offering will be iOS device you’ve been writing smartphone fan-fiction about.

Small smartphones aren’t for me

iphonese-2
I found switching from the massive 5.5-inch iPhone 6s Plus to the 4-inch iPhone SE a difficult task. If you looked at my messages from the last few weeks, emails and other forms of text I typed with the minuscule handset, you’d find countless typos.

While using the SE, I constantly found myself wondering how we ever got by using devices with such small displays. The same thoughts popped into my head when performing nearly any task with the SE beyond scrolling through my Twitter feed. Playing games like Alto’s Adventure and Badlands 2 felt cramped, and the smaller display size resulted in frequent accidental button presses and cramped fingers.

iphonese-1
On the plus side, the ability to easily slide the smartphone into my front pocket without it peaking out is something I haven’t experienced since using the iPhone 5 as my daily smartphone a number of years ago.

Will Android users convert?

iphonese-3
At Apple’s recent press event in Cupertino, California, one thing was made abundantly clear: the company is looking to pull users from Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows ecosystems with the release of the iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro.

So will the iPhone SE convince current Android users clinging to their rapidly aging 4-inch devices to make the jump to iOS? With devices like the Nexus 5X and Xperia Z5 Compact, offering solid experiences and comparable form factors – though they are slightly larger – I don’t see Apple’s lofty Android poaching goals coming to fruition with the release of the SE.

Fans of tiny phones rejoice

iphonese-1111
The SE is a smartphone for a very specific iOS user who felt left out with the release of the iPhone 6 and 6s, not a device that is going to convince Android owners to jump ship and join Apple’s walled-garden iOS ecosystem, especially at its $579 starting price point.

On the plus side for Apple, however, this means iOS users hanging onto their aging iPhone 4 and 5 generation devices, hoping Apple would once again release a smaller form factor, now have a viable upgrade option.

That’s not to say the SE isn’t without faults though. To some, the smartphone’s design will likely feel dated, and Apple’s decision to stick with the 5s’ 1334 x 750 pixel resolution is clearly an effort to recycle components leftover from the 5s’ initial run.

It’s worth noting, however, that the lack of excitement surrounding the SE’s release is a clear indication the company needs to do something big with the iPhone 7.

In the end, it’s quite obvious the iPhone SE isn’t for “phablet” users like myself. This is a device designed for a very specific fan of Apple’s products, it’s just currently unclear how large that audience actually is.

Pros

      • Great for iOS users waiting for a modern 4-inch device
      • Solidly built, small and compact
      • A iPhone 6s in an iPhone 4s body

Cons

      • Resolution is only 1334 x 750
      • Looks nearly identical to the iPhone 5s
      • Likely won’t convince Android users to jump ship

Related reading: iPhone SE hands-on: Power in a 4-inch package

Comments

  • Sanjay Kumar

    Tomorrow, I will try this one out.
    If the trade for my 5s is reasonable, then i will switch to it.

  • danakin

    Nice and balanced review Patrick!
    I think you meant the Z5 Compact when relating the SE to similarly sized offerings.
    Also, I’m not convinced Apple’s end game with this device is to poach Android users (at least not any more than other iPhone releases). I’m inclined to believe this is about serving those customers who bought into Apple’s commercials for 3.5″ and 4″ devices showing the thumb-sweep and the ergonomic decisions around those screen sizes. They do, after all, have to guard shareholder value against a tide that might downgrade their stock value. Releasing this device, at this time, is a smart move.

    • I’m glad you liked the review! Yes, I indeed did. Thanks for pointing that out. I’ve updated the review.

  • Great article. I agree with it. It is a great phone for what it has, being so small. I got it and I already like it, mostly because the size is perfect for my hands

  • danbob333

    Forget size. This phone will sell for one reason: it’s the cheapest iPhone.
    I also think it’s a much better deal than 6s or 6.

    • Comrade Yeti

      I agree. This is a $0 iPhone first and a small iPhone second. So many have 5S because it was the only $0 iPhone (on contract) available. Sure there’s some die hard small phone fans who will pick this up, but most want a cheap iPhone. The fact that this is an awesome $0 phone is a bonus.

    • Longtin

      It’s 99 on a contract.

    • thereasoner

      Can’t you get an iPhone 6 for $0 on contract?

    • Longtin

      It’s also $99 on a contract. There are bill credits depending on your plan however; also depending on where you go.

  • Zee

    I am still using my iPhone 4 – and I am happy with it. There are small jumps of technology from one device to another, but no huge leap to upgrade. I will wait for iPhone 7.

  • Takuya Mizobata

    I thought 6s had 5mp front facing camera

  • Brad Fortin

    “[…] Apple’s other iPhone offerings have moved beyond this outdated resolution to 1334 x 750 pixels. While it may not sound like it on paper, the difference in sharpness is noticeable […]”

    Difference in sharpness? The iPhone SE and iPhone 6S have the same pixel density, 326 ppi, so the sharpness is identical. The only device in Apple’s lineup with a different density is the 6/6S Plus at 401 ppi (but the UI renders at 3x, or 2208 x 1242, before being scaled back down to 1080p which essentially negates any increase in display sharpness).

    “This [battery life increase], however, is likely the result of improved software efficiency present in iOS 9.3 over iOS 6.0 and 7.0, rather than the tiny battery size increase.”

    There’s an easy way to test this: Upgrade a 5S to iOS 9.3 and see if there’s more than a 5% increase in battery life. According to Apple’s numbers the 5S gets about 10 hours of video playback whereas the SE gets 13 hours (audio goes from 40 to 50 hours, talk time from 10 hours to 14 hours, etc), much more than a 5% increase.

    “[…] it’s just currently unclear how large that audience actually is.”

    At least 30 million per year if 2015’s numbers are anything to go by.

    • 1. Throw all the specs out there related to ppi and pixel density you want, but when I compare both screens, the SE just does not look as sharp as the 6s. I’m also not the only person to have said this.

      2. Seems like a lot of time consuming work to prove a fact we already know is true. I also don’t currently have access to a 5S. My tests have the SE measuring in at about 12 hours, which is pretty damn close to Apple’s 13 hour estimate.

      3. Indeed – That’s why the review says cites the 30 million number.

    • RoboBonobo

      The SE has the same pixel density of the 6s. Se:640p 6s:750p. Both are 326ppi. The plus size models are the ones with higher pixel density.

      The increase in battery life is due to the newer processer having better power efficiency.

    • Brad Fortin

      Sharpness is a measure of detail, as in how much detail can fit within a certain area (say, an app icon). If two screens have an identical ppi and display the same item they will be able to display an identical amount of detail within that item, thus resulting in identical sharpness. The only advantage an iPhone 6/6S screen has over an iPhone 5/5S/SE screen is dual-domain pixels for better viewing angles, better colours and contrast, and thanks to a better backlight a brighter screen. Sharpness, however, remains identical.

      As an example, compare an app icon on both screens. The app icons are identical in size and detail, down to the pixel. Therefore there can be no difference in sharpness as there are no additional pixels to provide additional sharpness. The only way for there to be additional sharpness is with additional detail, which would require a larger app icon like the 3x resolution icons on the 6/6S Plus. You and the others who claim to have noticed a difference in sharpness must be conflating colours, contrast, and brightness with sharpness.

    • Mo Dabbas

      When you have a tiny screen you gotta stick your face into the phone to see stuff properly, so the retina display doesn’t become so retinaish after that. It became a cornea display or something.

      lol, actually this reminds me. A small screen size is a good way to make people forget about their apple music and tidal subscription. Imagine looking at those statements with the tiny screen……

    • Brad Fortin

      “When you have a tiny screen you gotta stick your face into the phone to see stuff properly”

      I’m sure you do when you forget your glasses.

    • Mo Dabbas

      hahaha. So it becomes a glasses display instead of retina display?

      I don’t wear glasses by the way.

    • Brad Fortin

      Sounds like you need some glasses if you have to put your face close enough to the screen that you can see the pixels.

    • FlamesFan89

      That’s actually not what sharpness is. Yes, density of the detail plays a role, and that’s where the whole “retina” stuff comes from. But that completely ignores the other factor which makes up sharpness, and that is acutance which has to do with the transition between edges. The display needs to be able to properly create boundaries between high contrast areas as opposed to blurring those boundaries, and that has nothing to do with the pixel density.

      If a display, even with a very high pixel density, doesn’t handle high contrasting boundaries well, then it won’t appear sharp.

      You THINK that sharpness is limited to pixel density/detail density, but you have ignored acutance. Go ask a photographer if sharpness is simply defined by detail density. While you are at it, try Googling “Unsharp Mask”

    • Brad Fortin

      You’re right to an extent, if Patrick is referring to perceived visual sharpness, which would be subjective from person to person, even from one time of the day to another, but even then the content’s sharpness will still vary based on the type of content being displayed. If the acutance in the content is stepped instead of sloped and both phones are showing content (like an app icon) of the same resolution at the same level of zoom the sharpness will still be the same. Differences in contrast levels in a display largely makes sloped acutance more prominent but has a negligible effect on stepped acutance. If we’re talking about digitally-created content like the phone’s interface elements or text there won’t be a noticeable difference in sharpness.

    • FlamesFan89

      The expression “word salad” suddenly comes to mind

    • Brad Fortin

      “sharpness is not simply detail”

      Sharpness *is* detail, as a decrease in detail directly correlates with a decrease in sharpness, and a display’s sharpness is affected most by pixel density. No hand-waving required.

    • FlamesFan89

      Again, that’s not true, and you are hand waving.

    • Longtin

      Well said on the Sharpness.

      You’d think they would do some research before posting an article. You’d also think who ever approves these articles would filter or correct some of the misinformation.

      We’re all human at the end of the day, everyone make mistakes!

    • FlamesFan89

      It wasn’t well said, because that’s not what sharpness is.

    • Longtin

      The article is wrong about sharpness.

    • FlamesFan89

      That may be, but so is Brad.

      Pro tip: sharpness is NOT simply pixel density.

    • danbob333

      “Difference in sharpness? The iPhone SE and iPhone 6S have the same pixel density, 326 ppi, so the sharpness is identical”

      You are so wrong. You fell into Apple marketing. Pixel density doesn’t matter. More pixels = sharper. If you think the pixel density is not high enough, just hold the phone further away from your eyes.

      More pixels allow more sharp content on a display. With less pixels, content on the iPhone SE will always appears less sharp.

    • Omineca

      Lovely to know that Apple’s 2011 marketing (that any higher pixel density could not be perceived by the human eye) was complete B.S. I wonder what other parts of their propaganda won’t stand the test of time.

    • Brad Fortin

      “Lovely to know that Apple’s 2011 marketing (that any higher pixel density could not be perceived by the human eye)”

      All they said was that at 326 ppi, held at an average distance of 10-12 inches, a person with 20/20 vision cannot discern individual pixels. Numerous tests have been conducted to test this claim and it has been verified to be true.

      But it’s pretty obvious that you’ve got a huge chip on your shoulder when it comes to Apple. (“Propaganda”? lol)

    • Omineca

      No. That ‘chip’ applies equally to all manufacturers’ false claims. I don’t care whose propaganda we’re discussing.

      What they said in this article when comparing the SE to other Apple offerings was, “While it may not sound like it on paper, the difference in sharpness is
      noticeable, even to those not accustomed to picking up on screen
      resolution-related minutia.”

      If you can notice the difference, then the original claim was misleading. How can an image on one device appear sharper if both have a pixel density beyond which you cannot perceive individual pixels? The implication of the original advertising was that Apple had surpassed a point beyond which the human eye could not make further distinctions.

    • Brad Fortin

      Copy + pasted from below:

      Sharpness is a measure of detail, as in how much detail can fit within a certain area (say, an app icon). If two screens have an identical ppi and display the same item they will be able to display an identical amount of detail within that item, thus resulting in identical sharpness. The only advantage an iPhone 6/6S screen has over an iPhone 5/5S/SE screen is dual-domain pixels for better viewing angles, better colours and contrast, and thanks to a better backlight a brighter screen. Sharpness, however, remains identical.

      As an example, compare an app icon on both screens. The app icons are identical in size and detail, down to the pixel. Therefore there can be no difference in sharpness as there are no additional pixels to provide additional sharpness. The only way for there to be additional sharpness is with additional detail, which would require a larger app icon like the 3x resolution icons on the 6/6S Plus. You and the others who claim to have noticed a difference in sharpness must be conflating colours, contrast, and brightness with sharpness.

    • FlamesFan89

      Copy + pasted from another comment of mine:

      That’s actually not what sharpness is. Yes, density of the detail plays a role, and that’s where the whole “retina” stuff comes from. But that completely ignores the other factor which makes up sharpness, and that is acutance which has to do with the transition between edges. The display needs to be able to properly create boundaries between high contrast areas as opposed to blurring those boundaries, and that has nothing to do with the pixel density.

      If a display, even with a very high pixel density, doesn’t handle high contrasting boundaries well, then it won’t appear sharp.

      You THINK that sharpness is limited to pixel density/detail density, but you have ignored acutance. Go ask a photographer if sharpness is simply defined by detail density. While you are at it, try Googling “Unsharp Mask”

    • Brad Fortin

      How much acutance affects sharpness depends on the resolution of the content and whether the acutance is stepped or sloped. With stepped content, like the phone’s interface and text, there won’t be a difference.

    • FlamesFan89

      That’s not true at all. Have a look at the wikipedia entry on acutance. They have a good example.

    • Do Do

      I read the first 2 lines and my mouth dropped, I thought could captain of the apple fanboys be trying to be objective? Then I realized you were quoting. You really do have it bad.

      Specs mean nothing (well not exactly nothing). If you want a solid appliance that works within “Apple’s” walled garden, of that size, This is the phone to beat in my books, assuming the battery in a such a small phone can take it. I’m buying one, not for me of course but for people that like small phones, I’m not aware of a better choice.

    • Brad Fortin

      “I read the first 2 lines and my mouth dropped, I thought could captain of the apple fanboys be trying to be objective? Then I realized you were quoting. You really do have it bad.”

      Sorry for correcting someone’s misuse of the word “sharpness”? I didn’t realize that knowing the definition of words made someone a “fanboy”. I guess you’ve avoided dictionaries your whole life in order to avoid being a “fanboy”?

    • Do Do

      You’re a fanboy because you’re incapable of critical thinking when it comes to Apple. That is MY definition of a complete fanboy and someone who’s opinion is typically ignored by most.

    • Brad Fortin

      Wow, you have your own definitions and you’re calling other people fanatics? Time to look in the mirror. Pot, meet kettle.

    • FlamesFan89

      I think it is your entire body of work commenting on this site that gets you labelled as a fanboy, and not this one post.

    • Brad Fortin

      You’ll notice it’s only the Apple-hating zealots who call me a fanboy.

    • FlamesFan89

      They are just the ones saying what everyone is thinking. 🙂

    • Brad Fortin

      They’re also the ones who insist the only specs that matter in a CPU are core count and clock speed, who think that memory management is identical on all platforms, and who will simultaneously complain in concurrent articles that 32 GB is both enough and not enough storage. You can listen to them all you want but anybody with knowledge of how this technology works will rightfully dismiss them.

    • FlamesFan89

      What about the ones that think sharpness is simply pixel density.

    • Brad Fortin

      In the context of a phone’s interface such a statement is true and doesn’t merit dismissal.

    • FlamesFan89

      You forgot to add “April Fools” to that ridiculous statement

    • Do Do

      Hmm, I just expressed I will be buying Iphone SE, I also own 3 other older iphones and I just bought the latest Macbook Pro and very likely to buy the next iteration. Apple has never been the problem, its the “fanboys” that cause it’s brand to take hits. You, and people like you in fact.

    • Longtin

      It’s actually far less superior than at least half of dozen Android devices at the same price point but yeah I understand where you are coming from they are all 5″ screen size. If your looking for something with a smaller screen than yeah Apple is the winner right now but anything else I wouldn’t consider a iPhone. Again personal preference at the end of the day right it’s all what the phone can do for you to enrich your life. Make your life easier more productive. I understand especially if you have a MacBook and you want to sync with the cloud and have your information on both. Easily done with Android phone as well, but I get it. It’s also smart for them to have many options as they understand many customers needs. There’s no one phone fits all yet.

  • Not for you

    “So will the iPhone SE convince current Android users clinging to their rapidly aging 4-inch devices to make the jump to iOS?”

    As a OG Moto X user, I gave some serious consideration to switching. But the monstrosity known as itunes (along with a few other issues) kept me in the Android camp. Ultimately picked up a Z5 Compact for the same price as the 16GB SE.

    • ShaBi

      What’s wrong with iTunes? It used to be pretty slow and buggy, but not anymore. It’s pretty quick and easy to use nowadays. Drag, drop, press sync, that’s it. You don’t really need to use it that much anyways.

    • Not for you

      Not a fan of the UI, bonjour has a habit of messing up the network stack under Windows, and it installs quicktime (another horrible UI). While there are workarounds on some of these specific issues, it’s just easier to stick with android for my use cases.

    • FTR_Part_deux

      Does the music player in Marshmallow support gapless album playback? From when I last followed, up to 2015, gapless playback wasn’t supported. I’m curious…

      On the flipside, iOS has had it feature for many versions.

    • FlamesFan89

      Not in Google Play Music. My test is always Dark Side of the Moon. There is a noticeable split second pause between tracks. It isn’t too terrible, only a split second, but certainly not gapless.

    • FTR_Part_deux

      Thanks for the reply, appreciate your time. It’s unfortunate that it isn’t an automatic feature these days. It took iOS a few iterations for them to finally support it. Hopefully soon, Android will support gapless playback.

    • FlamesFan89

      I did some digging, and if you have a stock Android phone, and turn on the equalizer, then gapless works (it was introduced in Jellybean). Unfortunately for me, I have a Samsung, and it doesn’t use the stock equalizer, so gapless doesn’t work. Don’t ask me why you have to use the equalizer to make it work, that’s a total here’s scratcher.

    • khmerkilla

      I have an iphone 6 and a macbook pro. and I dont even need to use my itunes for anything….. phones can hold their own, considering everything is on the cloud / online anyway. The idea of needing itunes for iphone has been obsolete for at least 3 years in the past.

    • Not for you

      AFAIK, iOS can’t play FLAC, so I’d have to transcode all of my music. And I’m not about to upload a couple of hundred GB of music into the cloud.

    • Longtin

      The problem with iPhones and Apple is the fact that they choose to only put 16GB of space instead they can easily start you off at 32GB. The fact that they can make their displays higher in DPI to actually make them HD. The fact that they can make their OS even faster by using more than just 2 or 4 cores. They just simply use the bare minimum in their phones just to get by, I mean I understand from a business side of things Apple needs to make money and cutting down costs by doing so. I just feel like their not at all in the same league as Android as far as value given for your dollar. A lot of companies do this as well. I prefer philanthropist companies OnePlusOne, Google etc… not companies that hire doctors to psychology trick you into “Needing” the phone. Consumerism at it’s finest. Again not all companies are perfect, but they are not even ethical anymore.

    • Not for you

      “philanthropist companies OnePlusOne, Google”

      LOL – I suggest you do a search for “google offshore tax”.

    • Longtin

      Every Corporation does that, it’s honestly one of the problems however even small businesses are starting too do it, as of right now it’s a grey area and if they can save money and expenses they will do it. At least Google spends in back into society and has a few dozen projects on actually helping humanity. Their Balloon project to give free internet to 3rd world countries being one example and they don’t overprice their products; see chromebook, nexus device lines etc… Google was also named the highest philanthropist corporation since 2010. Do some research on that.

    • Not for you

      Given they had over US$74 Billion in revenue, one would hope they have significant philanthropic programs. The point is that the majority of their profits are NOT dedicated to said programs.

    • Longtin

      Again Apple does the same put not even close to the same extent as Google.

  • jay

    I am using a 5s for work. Put a otterbox on it and you have a durable phone. Same as the SE for work it’s really good.

    But I am not an iOS user. Can’t see myself carry around an iPhone. It’s boring can’t do anything with it. Not even get a ringtone….

    • ShaBi

      Just FYI, its super easy to put a custom ringtone on an iPhone. Many steps, yes, but the whole process from cutting to having it on the phone takes about 5 min.

    • jay

      On my phone takes me a minute maybe less. Does not want to take any steps. Press three times on my screen done.

  • Mr Barkers

    As a current Note 5 user, and ex iphone 5s user, I would definitely consider picking one of these up as a second phone. I loved the former factor of the 5 series iphone, and think it still looks great today. There are days where I hate carrying a larger phone, so consider me the target demographic for this device.

  • Omar

    I’d rather get a OnePlus X. Sure it’s not 4-inches, but it has one of the best screens and build quality for its size, and is almost half the price.

    I don’t see why somebody invested in Android would trade down for this. For the 6s/6s Plus, sure. But this? Unless they switched to Android after having a 5s, I guess.

  • Can’t Fix Stupid

    Almost 3 year old form factor, 6 month old internals…at the end of the day this one all comes down to price.

    • Columbo

      It’d be actually priced pretty well if the base version was 32GB instead of 16.

      As it is, a 16GB phone with no expandable memory is a joke given what else is available in the market at the same price, and the 64GB is quite pricey.

  • thereasoner

    There were not 30 million 5s phones sold last year, Apple said 30 million 4″ phones which would include the 5c and 5 presumably. Also many of them may not stay on the 4″ iPhone considering that the iPhone 6 only came out 18 months ago so there’s still up to 6 months left on their contracts.

  • Shaun

    Donald Trump’s new phone! Small hands will love this, seriously though… Glad to see them put emphasis on a smaller device, will make all the other manufacturers do the same, to me 4.7-5.1″ is perfect, but to each their own!

  • Jim D

    If Apple really is trying to poach true Android users (not just marketing and gimmick users of Samsung’s rendition of Android), then they need to support at the bare minimum the ability to insert a micro SD into the device without the need for the purchase of an external attachment. And they should make the iPhone 7 price identical to the price of the SE while lowering the price of the SE altogether. Because let’s be real, Apple is not opening up their OS anytime soon. I’m a stock Android lover but I love my MacBook dearly (haters gonna hate), so if Apple at least made those changes to its lineup, this Android guy would switch in a heartbeat.

  • Longtin

    It’s very fast! Definitely recommended for Consumers who enjoy smaller screens! – Although it’s a small niche, someone had too do it. It should be free on a 2 year term however especially for the value it gives you.

    • FlamesFan89

      I think Apple was very smart in releasing this phone. I think it will sell really well for them, and looks like a really solid device.

      That said, I personally couldn’t imagine going back to such a tiny screen. It would feel like I was trading in my current workstation for a 386 or something.

  • MegaHurTz

    Innovative

    • Wishy Washy

      You know it, dude-bro!!!

  • People who want a cheaper iPhone should go with this one, and not the iPhone 6. There’s no point of keeping it there.

  • Wishy Washy

    This bad-boi will kick ***, dude-bro!

  • vinay jaiswal

    remind me of old iphone 5s ,not impressed with new iphone

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