iPad Pro review

The Professional

Daniel Bader

November 11, 2015 7:00am

A few weeks ago, Apple arrived at Pixar Studios with a handful of iPad Pros, beseeching their employees — illustrators, graphic designers, animators and 3D compositors — to use the tablet in place of their traditional input combination, be it a Wacom slate or pen and paper.

The move was unprecedented for a company famous for its secrecy, particularly because the Pixar employees were encouraged to go public with their findings.

Of particular importance to Apple’s public relations campaign to revitalize its flagging tablet sales was to position the iPad Pro as more than just an oversized iPad, a factor the company had to overcome when its first tablet was immediately called “just a big iPhone” upon its debut in 2010.

Five years later, the iPad is still by far the most popular tablet on earth, commanding a dominant 86 percent of worldwide tablet web usage. That statistic betrays a truth about the iPad: for many buyers, it sits in a purgatory between the phone and the laptop, used more often on the couch than the office.

But there’s another side to the story: the iPad is a PC, and has for many people replaced their laptops. The more casual user may peck away an email or edit a report on Apple’s virtual keyboard, and a smaller segment may buy a Bluetooth keyboard case or a capacitive stylus to augment the kinds of experiences Apple has tacitly enabled over the past five years.

With the iPad Pro, Apple is giving those users, the ones that see the iPad as the future of personal computing, a brand new canvas, one with nearly everything they asked for. But does it come with too high a cost? And how does it compare to products like the Surface?

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Specs

  • iOS 9.1
  • 12.9-inch 2732 x 2048 pixel IPS laminated display,
  • A9X SoC (2 x A9 cores @ 2.15Ghz), M9 co-processor
  • 4GB RAM
  • 8MP rear camera, F2.4 lens
  • 1.2MP front-facing camera
  • 802.11 (a/b/g/n/ac), dual-channel (2.4Ghz, 5Ghz) MIMO
  • Bluetooth 4.2
  • LTE optional (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 28, 29, 38, 39, 40, 41)
  • 10 hours battery life over WiFi), nine hours over LTE
  • Second-gen Touch ID sensor
  • Four speakers for stereo sound in any orientation
  • 220.6 x 305.7 x 6.9mm
  • 713 grams (WiFi), 723 grams (WiFi + Cellular)
  • 32GB WiFi ($1049), 128GB WiFi ($1249), 128GB WiFi + Cellular ($1429)

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I bought the first iPad back in 2010, realizing it was more than just a big iPhone. But as the hardware has thinned, the internals become more powerful, and the software and app ecosystem more eclectic and full-featured, its uses cases have waned. And I’m not alone in feeling this way.

Blame the rise of the phablet. With phones getting bigger — and statistically, whether you’re an iPhone or Android user, you’re still likely to purchase an iPad over a competing tablet — the explicit need for yet another screen between the smartphone and the laptop has declined.

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The iPad Pro gives an awkward first impression. The human brain can quickly adapt to scale, but when you’re used to something being a certain size and weight, there can be an adjustment period. Upon first picking up Apple’s 12.9-inch slate, I had a disorienting Brobdingnagian feeling of being suddenly shrunken, the object before me a precise recreation of an object I know and use nearly every day.

But whereas the iPad Air 2 mainly resides on my bedside table, for reading and catching up on Twitter, I could tell right away that the iPad Pro would likely live in the office.

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The tablet does have a few significant design departures from the 9.7-inch iPad worth noting. Bezels above the display have been reduced to the same extent that the side bezels were with the iPad Air, improving the screen-to-body ratio and making the front appear more symmetrical.

And while the Lightning port, power, volume and home buttons are all in the same spots, the iPad Pro includes four identical speaker holes etched into the aluminum chassis, equally spaced to the left and right sides on the top and bottom of the tablet, respectively. Four speakers of course make for louder output — Apple claims three times the volume over the iPad Air 2, and it’s true — but the radical improvement here is in the bass, which is actually discernible amidst the highs and mids.

I’ll get the obvious out of the way: watching movies on the iPad Pro is a wonderful experience. It’s just the right size to see all the relevant details, and scales up 1080p video with no visual artifacts. The 2732×2048 pixel IPS display employs a technique called “photo alignment,” ensuring the 5.6-million pixels that comprise the screen are always firing the right way and in the correct direction.

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Like the 5K iMac released in late 2014, the iPad Pro employs a custom display timing controller, necessary because there were no components available to Apple to ensure a stable stream of pixels from the GPU to the screen — so Apple built one itself. Not only does this inherently lower energy consumption, because it enables more subtle gradations in brightness, but it allowed Apple to build custom refresh rates into iOS for the first time.

The iPad Pro can go down to 30Hz when a static image is displayed on the screen, lowering power consumption during marathon reading sessions and other low-movement activities.

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What’s interesting about the amount of custom technology in the iPad Pro’s display is how quickly the company’s Mac innovations are trickling down to the iPad. From the Oxide TFT panel to the timing controller itself, Apple has quickly adapted one of its most impressive in-house developments to a much more mainstream product in the iPad Pro. Expect to see similar iterations in future versions of the iPad and iPhone.

But the iPad Pro is a touch-enabled device, running iOS 9. The operating system was designed for touch, and as much as the iPad Pro’s marketing is going to emphasize its utility as a laptop replacement, it still exists in between a traditional tablet and a laptop. That is never more evident than while using the Pencil, Apple’s first home-built stylus, and one of the stranger accessories the company has released.

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First, know this: Pencil has the lowest latency of any powered stylus I’ve used, and that includes the new Surface Pro 4’s pen. The difference is subtle, and Microsoft’s solution offers its own advantages, but the Apple Pencil is simply the best tool for precise input I’ve found on a portable computer. Designed to work with Apple Notes and a number of recently-updated design-based apps like FiftyThree’s Paper, Adobe’s Creative Cloud, ProCreate, Evernote and many more, the Pencil feels well balanced and comfortable.

Because of its 240Hz refresh rate, I found that even the more precise movements were recognized. The stylus also recognizes tilt, which allows developers to add a second variable to the input; in most cases, painting apps use the tilt motion to bloom the size of a brush or extend the eraser, but developers, like they do with 3D Touch, have free rein to adopt it how they see fit.

The stylus also has some of the best palm rejection I’ve seen from a tablet. The iPad Pro’s physical screen is considerable, and there are going to be times where it is necessary to place part of a hand or palm on the display to sketch, shade or write, and screen is almost always able to tell what’s part of a palm and what’s a finger. That’s good because it’s possible to even use a finger on the display while using the Pencil.

While in Apple’s newly-improved Notes app, holding two fingers on the display creates a virtual ruler that the Pencil then adheres to when drawing straight lines. It’s a remarkable way to show off what’s possible with the tool, but also reinforces that the Pencil is more than just a piece of plastic; there are complex electronics inside, and the iPad can tell the difference.

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The Pencil’s body is a made of a smooth white plastic that will probably get marked up over time, since Apple has committed the sin of simplicity, by omitting a place to store the tool in between sessions.

Unlike the Surface Pen, whose magnetized metal exterior can be attached to the side of its Surface Book and Surface Pro 4 hosts, the Pencil’s only means of storage is through its built-in Lightning adapter, revealed by popping off the magnetic cap and plugging it into an iOS device. If you manage not to lose the Pencil (check the bottom of your bag, where mine usually lay hiding), it lasts for 12 hours, but like most peripherals, only needs a few minutes of charging to get right back to work.

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Though Pencil costs a stupefying $129 CAD, for many people, mostly creative professionals, it will be built into the price of the device. Apple has always commanded a premium for products that have significant impacts on peoples’ lives, and to many artists, designers, architects, compositors and photographers, using the Pencil to make precise refinements to an image or creating a painting from nothing feels like part of the same continuum.

And while Microsoft has done an admirable job enticing companies like Adobe to adopt desktop versions of Photoshop and Illustrator to support pen input on Windows 10, because iOS 9 has a touch-first modality, those same companies are free to create iPad Pro apps like Photoshop Fix and Adobe Sketch, whose mobile-first lineages are free from the complex, menu-heavy user experiences found in most Windows apps.

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That touch-first experience extends to iOS as a whole, whose latest version brought Split View multitasking and picture-in-picture video, along with a host of improvements to Siri.

Split View has been a slow burn feature, the type that doesn’t seem to solve the traditional issues surrounding multitasking on a sandboxed operating system like iOS, but over time, as the apps one uses grow to support it, it proves its worth.

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Tim Cook thinks the iPad Pro will replace the laptops of millions of people around the world. But before he made that claim to The Telegraph, it was foremost in my mind: are people going to consider the iPad Pro instead of a MacBook Air or even a MacBook Pro?

To Apple, these are the same customer: as long as they stay within the company’s vast ecosystem of profitable hardware, Cook doesn’t care how you get things done.

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But to test the mettle of the iPad’s post-PC claims requires living in that world — so that’s what I did. Every morning, I brought the iPad Pro to work, unsheathing it from its Smart Keyboard case as I would my MacBook Pro. And it succeeded — for the most part.

Ironically, despite the sheer number of high-quality applications available through Apple’s App Store, I almost always had a Safari browser window open on the left side, and something, be it Slack, Tweetbot, Evernote or theScore, on the right. What felt cramped and muddled on the iPad Air 2 worked flawlessly on the iPad Pro; the extra screen space, which amounts to a whole iPad app vertically oriented spread twice across the screen, made it relatively easy to get my work done.

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For my workflow, I found iOS’s lack of background services, such as Dropbox sync, a major detriment, since I would have to explicitly open the app whenever I wanted to initiate a download, something I never have to think about on my MacBook Pro.

But I quickly realized that the enforced window management of having two apps side by side in either a 50/50 or 75/25 split made it easy to rethink the way I worked, since I was only given two options. iOS 9 makes it easy to switch between these apps, too, and on the iPad Pro it is made even easier with the Command-Tab function adapted from OS X.

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This brings us to the Smart Keyboard, which is, like the Surface’s Type Cover, sold separately from the iPad. While I would argue that the Apple Pencil is very much an optional accessory for the iPad Pro buyer, the Smart Keyboard is not.

Without it, the iPad Pro loses much of its effectiveness as a laptop replacement, and whether Apple is keen on admitting it, the slate is not nearly as compelling a solution — and loses its “Pro”-ness — without a keyboard.

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Most accessory companies have built iPad keyboards for the smaller units, but Apple’s Smart Connector changes everything by losing the need for Bluetooth. One could argue that at such close range Bluetooth is pretty reliable, but that wasn’t the issue: until now, every wireless keyboard required a battery, which added bulk and needed to be charged. Yes, Apple has created yet another proprietary connector for which manufacturers will have to pay license fees, but the upside is that they will derive power from the iOS device itself (the iPad Pro is undoubtedly the first of many Apple products to use the Smart Connector), and obtain much greater data bandwidth through a hard connection. Apple isn’t saying what the bus speed is for Smart Connector, but it’s surely at least 10 times the speed of Bluetooth 4.x’s 25 megabits per second.

The $229 CAD Smart Keyboard is a great product, and one of the best keyboards I’ve typed on. Unlike Apple’s MacBook keyboards, the keys themselves are tightly covered in fabric, protecting them from impact, dirt and other mistreatment. The material is not dissimilar to what Microsoft uses on its Type Covers, but instead of a trackpad the keys go right up to the edge.

It’s strange using a device like this with no trackpad, no mouse, especially when the mode of operation is physically moving your hand up to the display to tap on items. That awkwardness is exacerbated by the fact that the Smart Keyboard only holds the iPad at a single angle, albeit one that works for most use cases. It’s better on the lap than the table, but it can work for both.

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Perhaps the strangest thing about the Smart Keyboard isn’t how it works, but how it folds. As thin as the actual keyboard element is — it’s only about three millimetres — Apple had to fit the extra girth somewhere, so its engineers designed a solution where the keyboard folds under the outer layer of the case itself. It’s not perfect, and was likely prototyped a hundred different ways, but it works remarkably well while simultaneously keeping the device both secure and clean.

With the Keyboard Cover attached, the iPad Pro weighs just over a kilogram, or 2.34 pounds, just over half a pound less than a 13″ MacBook Air, and 1.2 pounds less than a MacBook Pro. These are significant weight differences, and will certainly factor into some peoples’ choices to purchase the iPad over a MacBook.

Logi CREATE Keyboard Case_Blue

Apple has also opened up the Smart Connector to MFi-certified companies. I got to try Logitech’s Logi CREATE Backlit Keyboard Case with Smart Connector, which encloses the entire iPad in in a hard plastic shell. The keyboard itself is much more akin to a traditional MacBook experience, with clicky, backlit keys that feel tactile and springy, but it weighs much more than Apple’s Smart Keyboard case, and doesn’t look nearly as sleek. On the plus side, it too doesn’t need to be charged, despite the presence of its backlight.

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Whether the iPad Pro is connected to a keyboard or not, the tablet is the fastest in Apple’s retinue of A9-powered devices, and, subjectively, one of the fastest computers I’ve used this year. The company’s A9X chip is a very different beast than the A8X, which itself was a slightly modified version of the A7.

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Not only has Apple reduced the number of cores to two, from three in the A8X, it has ramped up the clock speed in each one to 2.15Ghz, compared to 1.5Ghz in each A8X core. Apple is able to do this because the chips themselves are smaller, and output less heat, expanding the thermal threshold past 2Ghz.

This is the first time an A-series chip has broached that vaulted clock speed, and helps the A9X demolish previous single-core and multi-core Geekbench benchmarks in the mobile category.

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To put the A9X’s single-core performance in perspective, it surpasses the Intel Core i7-870 in the 2010 27″ iMac, and is only slightly below the Core i7-2600, which arrived a year later. More impressive is that the A9X’s single-core benchmark eclipses the 1.7Ghz Core i7-4650U inside the 2013 MacBook Air, and its two cores come close to beating the quad-core chip in Geekbench’s multi-chip benchmark.

The fact that Apple also returned to a dual-core CPU setup speaks to the confidence it has in the A9’s abilities.

On the GPU side, Apple has clearly beefed up both the number of cores, from six in the iPhone 6s to likely eight or ten, as well as each one’s clock speeds. In tests like GFXBench’s Manhattan Offscreen, the iPad Pro scored 100 percent better than the iPhone 6s, and 100 percent better than the iPad Air 2; the two older devices scored the same for two very different reasons.

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Though it may seem awkward to recommend the iPad Pro as a gaming machine, there is great potential given the power it has. I also tested 3D4Medical’s Complete Anatomy, an app that renders the body’s various systems — muscular, vascular, nervous — in real-time using extremely high-resolution textures that can be both zoomed in and manipulated. The app, which was buttery smooth on the iPad Pro, is the type of app Apple has used to great effect over the years, showcasing a product’s computing power and intuitiveness in one fell swoop.

The iPad Pro can run all of the nearly one million apps made for the smaller iPads, though ones that haven’t been explicitly updated to support the Pro’s higher-resolution display will scale up, with fuzzy text and less usable space, similar to the way an iPhone 5-era app scales to the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.

The ones that have been updated, like Slack, Evernote and Adobe’s Creative Cloud suite, have around the same usable space as the same app on a MacBook Pro, and for the most part are just as capable.

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This is the conundrum, and something I want to emphasize if you’re deciding between a laptop like a MacBook or Surface Book and the iPad Pro: the iPad can facilitate more experiences better than the MacBook, but the MacBook is still better at some core things, like multitasking and sharing information between apps, and likely will be for the foreseeable future. But iOS is taking more from OS X than the other way around, and if the iPad Pro engenders a replacement cycle similar to a laptop, which it will, the two platforms will be closer in two years from now — but the iPad will still be the only one with touch support, Pencil support, and a million apps.

The other advantage to the iPad Pro is battery life. Apple promises around 10 hours of use on WiFi, and nine on LTE, but I nearly doubled that in my testing. The company has always been conservative with its iPad battery estimates, and based on my workflow I found the device to last nearly 18 hours on a charge, which is some 10 hours longer than my 13-inch MacBook Pro. I can’t promise everyone will have the same experience — I wasn’t playing games or watching videos during my work days — but there is a clear energy advantage to be had from the low-power A9X chip over an Intel Core solution in a MacBook.

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The iPad Pro also borrows the iPhone 6s’s new WiFi and LTE capabilities, expanding speeds to 867Mbps and 300Mbps respectively. The only cellular version is $1429 CAD 128GB model, which is a shame, but the company is clearly going after potential laptop buyers looking to stay connected wherever they go. Also adapted from the new iPhones are the second-generation Touch ID sensor, which is much faster than that of the iPad Air 2, and considerably more accurate than on previous generations.

In fact, the only disappointing aspects of the hardware are its cameras, which have remained identical to the iPad Air 2 at 8MP and 1.2MP respectively. There is an irony in the camera’s relatively poor optics in that Apple encourages you to edit three streams of 4K video on the iPad Pro’s beautiful screen, knowing that the likely source would be from a phone a fifth the physical size. That’s where iCloud Photo Library comes in, which synchronizes a person’s media through iCloud.

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The iPad Pro is a tablet that can replace your laptop. Microsoft’s tag for its Surface line applies just as readily to Apple’s new slate, even if the former doesn’t run what many would consider a “desktop” operating system. The difference between the iPad Pro and the Surface Pro 4 is that without the keyboard attachment it is thoroughly reduced in usability, both from an app ecosystem and software design perspective.

The iPad Pro, on the other hand, inherits thousands of incredible applications that don’t need, and will never need, any peripherals. But when a keyboard is attached, the iPad Pro is almost as good as the laptops it will eventually replace. It’s not quite there yet, and most people should probably wait a generation until some of its software kinks are sorted out, but there will be many, like me, who love the iPad Pro for what it can do today.

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The final consideration is price. In Canada, the markup on the iPad Pro is fairly substantial, owing to the continued weakness in the dollar. The 32GB WiFi $799 USD entry-level version is $1049 CAD here; the 128GB WiFi version is $949 USD and $1249 CAD; and the most expensive, and most desirable option, the 128GB LTE model, is $1079 USD and and $1429 CAD. Add in the cost of a $229 Smart Keyboard (and a $129 Pencil) and you’re looking at spending nearly $1500 tax-in for an iPad. By contrast, the cheapest Surface Pro 4, which features an Intel Core m3 chip, 4GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, costs $1179 CAD, and with a $169 Type Cover comes to around the same price as the 128GB WiFi iPad Pro.

That’s a lot of money for a big screen and a keyboard. And for many, it will be too much, especially for an unproven form factor. But if you’ve been considering buying both a MacBook Air and a smaller iPad, it may be worth taking the leap.

Pros

  • Beautiful design
  • Consistently excellent performance
  • Sharp, responsive display
  • Very low latency on Apple Pencil
  • Smart Keyboard case well designed
  • Lots of compatible productivity apps
  • iOS 9 multitasking is a boon to usability
  • Excellent battery life

Cons

  • Pricey
  • Requires separate keyboard to reach full potential
  • Disappointing cameras
  • guyfromtrinidad

    Well now we know what you were teasing on AAA last night. 🙂

  • jclowater

    iPad pro 128 $1249.00. iPhone 6s Plus 128 $1289.00.

    • brent

      I know, how stupid is that?!?!?!?!?!

    • St. Misery

      Really good observation there. Is one underpriced and the other overpriced? Let’s be realistic, both are ridiculous.

    • Marc Palumbo

      the iPhone does hold greater value because of the simple fact that most people will always carry their phone with them and use it every 5 minutes. The iPad is not the same case. Most people can go without the iPad for a week and not be bothered, so I actually see much less value in the iPad than the iPhone.

    • J.S.Bach

      I suspect one of the reasons iPad sales are slowing is because of the 6s Plus. I do 90% of my browsing on my phone because of the screen size.

    • jclowater

      I think this is true for a lot of people.
      Having said that , I have an iPhone 6 Plus and an iPad mini 2. I do use the mini a lot when I am at home as the bigger screen is a lot nicer for books, flip board, web etc.

      I really want to upgrade to an iPad mini 4 but have not been able to justify it to myself yet.

    • If I want books I use my kindle. My tablet is for nothing that I cant already do on my lumia. Usually faster. I agree there is very little reason to upgrade unless you break your device.

    • jclowater

      The reason for me to upgrade is the much better screen on the mini 4.

      I prefer the tablet to the kindle for reading.

    • to each there own. 🙂

    • Vito R.

      I don’t think so. The tablet market was slowing well before the 6 Plus was released. I think the upgrade cycle for tablets just isn’t as frequent as it is with smartphones.

    • J.S.Bach

      True, but the overall market for tablets was declining because Samsung and others were making big phones but iPads specifically were hit hard because of the 6s Plus I suspect.

    • Vito R.

      I think the iPhone 6 Plus may have had *some* impact, but I don’t think it was too significant. I don’t think going from a 4.5″ to a 5.5″ screen is enough to replace a tablet – but maybe it is for some people. I think the bigger impact has been cheap Android tablets that are “good enough” for Netflix and gaming.

    • MassDeduction

      5.5″ is tiny. I find my Lumia 640 XL (5.7″ screen) smaller than ideal. The Lumia 1520 (6″ screen) was perfect for me. I had both 7″ and 8″ tablets, and when I got a phablet I used them hardly at all anymore. I now use my phablet and my Surface Pro 3, and that’s about it. I rarely use my mid-sized tablets, and I now rarely use my laptop. The only two devices I need for 99% of my computing is a phablet for content consumption, and a Surface Pro 3 for content creation. I’m eagerly awaiting continuum to add my desktop to the list of devices that have lost out in the great convergence war. 😀

    • Vito R.

      I don’t think Continuum is going to be useful until Lumias run x86 chips – otherwise it’s just like Windows RT tablets all over again.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Maybe. I do enjoy the thought of plugging the display dock into my TV and turning my phone into a smart tv instantly. There’s a lot of value right there. And the dock only costs 100$.

    • Vito R.

      $100 seems like a lot when you can plug many Android phones into a tv using a cheap MHL adapter.

      In practice, I only did it to see that I could do it and I didn’t find it very useful. ChromeCast is a much more elegant solution and something like an Amazon FireTV stick is even better. They idea of using a mouse and keyboard with my TV never appealed to me.

    • Marc Palumbo

      You probably won’t need a keyboard at all. Maybe a mouse at first, but there may be some BT remote controls to get you to connect. You’ll be able to be in tablet mode and BOOM – Smart TV

    • Vito R.

      Again, that’s doesn’t appeal to me in the least. Android has been doing this for years and it didn’t appeal to me then and it still doesn’t appeal to me now.

      However, if Microsoft’s Continuum dream actually works well (not now, but likely in a few years) I could definitely see myself carrying my “desktop” in my pocket and docking it with my monitor/keyboard/mouse at work/home. I don’t think the phones are powerful enough to mimic desktop performance for even light tasks just yet, but it won’t be long.

    • Marc Palumbo

      What Android was doing was just pure garbage, and I think you would need to research the two. These have been pointed out since Continuum was introduced. You cannot compare what Microsoft is doing with Continuum and what Android did in the past. Trust me, it’s just not the same. Windows 10 is far more powerful than Android at this stage. With Android, you’re pretty much constrained to the device it’s installed on.

      If the rumored Intel phone does get released next summer, then that’s the start of the future. One device for all your needs (unless they are specific). Having been a .NET developer and watching how powerful universal windows apps are, I’m rather impressed by them. Does it suffer from lack of apps, yes. Yes of course it does. I also believe many people are close minded, especially Windows. Many people still think Windows phones/tablets run XP or Vista. Some people still think that Windows is full of viruses, which has been proven to be one of the most secure OSs out there. Getting people out of this mindset is the challenge.

    • Vito R.

      Marc, you need to chill out and read what people are saying and not automatically assume they don’t know what they’re talking about.

      I said have I have *no desire to plug my phone into my TV* but I’m very interested in a device that lets me take my desktop with me.

      I don’t think anybody thinks (or care enough about Windows Phone) that Windows Phone run Vista. Most people don’t know what Windows Phone is. The people that know what Windows Phone is (like myself) who have bought *multiple* Windows Phones know that the software just isn’t there and that’s what’s killing the platform. Could I use a Windows Phone? Yeah, I could and I have, but I’m just not happy with it because unfortunately for Microsoft there are other devices with nicer hardware and much better software support currently on the market. You can try and make the case that Windows Phone is a decent OS and it is, decent, but it’s still not up to par with Android and iOS in my opinion.

    • Marc Palumbo

      People that go on tech websites are not the ones I’m talking about. These are the everyday guys who look at my phone and say “Is that the Note”. Clearly, they think a yellow Note exists. I correct them and tell them that it is a Windows phone and they ask me if it runs Vista. They also ask me if I need to update my drivers all the time. These are the same people that talk to their friends and tell them the iPhone is the best phone.

      Your first comment was telling me that Android has been doing this for years. Expand on what you’re trying to say. To me, this sounds like Microsoft is late to bringing a display dock to expand the screen size since Android has had this capability. If I still do not understand, then you need to be less cryptic and explicitly tell me your thoughts. You may have no *desire* to do this, but for a guy who claims he loves tech and will just buy it to try it out, you’re being hypocritical at the moment.

      I’m pretty chill right now. I’m on my 2nd coffee of the day and work is going well. As we approach the weekend, I’m letting my beard grow and paying less and less attention to things. All the great makings of chilliness.

    • Vito R.

      “Everyday guys” have no idea what Windows Phone is, not sure why you think they should know that a Note does not come in yellow – you sound obnoxious when you suggest that everybody should know that. I’ve never personally had anyone ask me if Windows Phone runs Vista or needs daily driver updates – but I guess it’s possible some people might think that.

      Android has had the ability to cast it’s screen via HDMI and turning a TV into a “smart TV” for years. Microsoft’s Continuum functionality is about trying to create a smart tv but instead it’s much more ambitious – to serve as a portable desktop (also something that the Motorola Atrix was doing 5 years ago, poorly).

      Talking about using a smartphone to plug into a tv to turn it into a smart tv, how am I being hypocritical? I told you I tried it when it came out and it was not very useful. Just because I love tech doesn’t mean I love to use useless tech. I tried it and I found no use for it and I moved on. I do not see a need to plug my phone into a TV to use it as a smart tv when better solutions exist (like ChromeCast). This mirrors my current feeling about Windows Phone – I tried it, found it to be substandard relative to the alternatives and so I moved on. I would not continue to punish myself by using it just because it’s new. While some people might like the simplicity or are required to use it for work or just like the fact that it’s yellow – I’m not one of those people.

      Lastly, and once again because you seem to miss this part, I *do* see value in what Microsoft is trying to do with Continuum – as long as the performance is there and it doesn’t feel like a crippled experience.

    • Marc Palumbo

      All Android did was stretch out the screen to fit the output screen. This is not what Continuum does. There’s a lot more engineering behind this. All Android allowed was for taking the output of the device and stretch it to fit the other screen. It looked weird, terrible and quirky altogether. Continuum is different in that it allows the user to view the desktop mode apps on Continuum and the mobile version of the app on the phone. Go check the Mail app as an example. On phone and Continuum, they look like different apps, but they’re not.

      “Microsoft’s Continuum functionality is about trying to create a smart tv but instead it’s much more ambitious” err what? No, it’s never tried to do that at all. That’s just a use case. You can treat your phone however you want. That’s a better direction Microsoft wants you to take. You make what you want out of it. I think you’re missing the idea and vision behind Continuum. It’s not a Smart TV in the making. it won’t replace your Xbox, it’s not replacing your Playstation, it’s not replacing your Smart Hub (for those who only have a non Smart – TV).

      “Just because I love tech doesn’t mean I love to use useless tech.” I think we had a discussion yesterday about the iPad Pro. Anyone who claims to “love tech” would be willing to try anything and understand the differences between them. I;m not asking you to buy into Windows. I don’t need to do that and I don’t get paid for it, but at least understand the difference between what Microsoft is doing with Continuum and what Google did with Android. I used to own a Blackberry Playbook that allowed to connect my tablet to a TV, and I can tell you it sucked. This is not the same at all and not by a long stretch. All I’m asking is that you do your research before you compare it with something that is not even close.

    • Vito R.

      Marc, you’re wasting everybody’s time if you’re not going to read what I write.

      I know Continuum is *not* a smart tv, I’ve said it multiple times – clearly I just mis-typed in the quote you used – did you not read the rest of what I wrote? YOU are the one that said you were excited to connect it to your TV to make it a smart TV and I was the one that said I want to use it as a desktop replacement.

      We are basically agreeing here, you’re just being too quick to understand or too lazy to read what I write. I’m not sure which it is.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Sure let’s go your way since I don’t feel like wasting my time with your non-sense. Enjoy your iPad Pro.

    • Vito R.

      Yes. My non-sense of being a rational person and agreeing with you regarding the potential of Continuum. Where as you don’t actually read what others actually write and accuse them of being ignorant of the facts.

    • Longtin

      Just in my experience testing, selling and getting to speak to a lot of developers; windows phone always had the most technical issues, glitches, bugs, it was ridiculous how many Nokia phones we had to send out for repair because of technical issues inside the phones itself. I’m glad we stop selling that phone. Even the HTC version had some problems. It’s definitely a work in progress however I personally think at this stage Android and Apple are far beyond above strictly for mobile purposes. Now if you’re trying to get Windows will take there surface pro tablet and turn a phone out of it – along with intel ; it might do decent compared to other windows phones, however I can’t see them taking over.

    • Marc Palumbo

      They don’t want to take over. They just want a piece of the pie at the moment. Even if Microsoft would drop their mobile division, it wouldn’t be the end of the world for Microsoft. They have what they do best and so does Apple. Microsoft is more interested in apps, and that may just be their strategy. They can spread their seed all over iOS and Android (which is what they’re doing) and conquer the app market. In fact, that may even be a better strategy, which is why you’ve heard certain rumours about Microsoft running their own version of Android.

      Go look at all the outcries for MS apps on iOS and Android getting more work in than Windows mobile.

      There is always a bigger picture and Microsoft is picking and choosing what they’re capable of. Just go back and look at the last Windows 10 devices announcement. How much dedication did Panos Panay give to the Lumia line. Maybe 5 minutes? The rest was all Surface. This is what they want. I think the MS Office on iOS presentation was longer than the Lumia 950/XL 550 announcement.

      Don’t count Microsoft out… ever. Try to understand what they’re really doing.

      PS: I’m a .NET developer and this is how I see what they’re doing.

    • thomas nguyen

      I think iPads were hit hard 2-3 years ago when the note line was released. they were 6″ and in the same time, Apple released their “Mini”. Pro should have been released a year or 2 ago to make meaningful impact, well before the surface line from MS, which at the moment, is a much better investment than an iPad Pro

    • Longtin

      It’s also because Samsung has been stealing some iPad sales; look at the Q1 2015 Results, Apple is at 26% and Samsung is at 19%

    • Vito R.

      The discussion was about the 6 Plus cannibalizing iPad sales but OK. When iPad sales were virtually 100% of tablet market then they could only go down from there right? Of course Samsung grab some marketshare but if you actually LOOKED at the Q1 numbers you’d see both Samsung and Apple sales are both down – so it’s kind of hard for Samsung to be responsible for Apple’s decline when they themselves are losing sales. The market in general is shrinking but Apple and Samsung are shrinking faster than the tablet market in general because cheaper tablets are growing their market share.

    • rick

      Then why is Apple so concerned with replacing lagging ipad sales. As the author notes – cook doesn’t care what apple device you buy – as long as its apple. so I don’t believe 6s is cannibalizing ipad sales.

    • Longtin

      I’d prefer a Macbook at that price.

  • Mr Bojangles

    This is an overpriced, ridiculous device when you consider it’ll set you back over $2,000 with the keyboard, pencil, 128GB model and taxes in. At those prices you’re better off buying a laptop or a Surface Pro 4 with superior specs and a full desktop OS.

    I like Apple products but let’s get real. Who is this device really for given its limitations?

    • Vito R.

      Why do people need to spend $2000 for this to be useful to them? I’m going to buy the $1050 base model and see how it goes. If I like it, I’ll keep it, if not it’s going back.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Because you’re talking about adding the extra storage, keyboard and the pen. Without the accessories this is pointless to buy over any other iPad model. Either way, even the base model puts this into a category that just isn’t worth the price points.

    • Vito R.

      It is expensive, no doubt. I might be better off with just an iPad Air 2, but I’m going to give it a shot. If it’s not worth it then I’ll return it but at least I will get to play with it for a while to decide for myself.

      But he makes a good point, you *need* the keyboard with the Surface since it’s pretty useless as a tablet.

    • Marc Palumbo

      it’s not useless as a tablet. Why would you say that. I think you’re forgetting who Daniel is.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Exactly. The full functionality can’t be enjoyed without the accessories here and those are pushing the price over $2000 with taxes included. I use an Air 2 and considering this I’d stick with that just because its more manageable for what I do with it. Still, give it a shot you may like it.

    • How is the Surface useless as a tablet? I’m guessing you’ve never actually used one and are talking out of your backside.

    • Vito R.

      I take that back, I didn’t mean to say it’s “useless” just that it’s not as good as an iPad for what most people want a tablet for. The lack of apps, the price – it would not be a good idea for someone to buy it *just* to use it as a tablet. It would be like buying a Porche to use to commute to work in traffic over a bumpy road – you could do it, but there are better, cheaper alternatives. The Surface is meant to be sold with the type cover as a laptop replacement – that’s the task it was designed for.

    • MassDeduction

      I agree with what you say, with one exception. If you replace “Window 8” with “Windows 10”, then I feel the same as you. I loved Windows 8 on tablets. Windows 10 is better because of the improved and improving universal apps ecosystem, but I much preferred Windows 8’s user interface.

    • Rio

      The thing is Windows as a Desktop OS is made for the precision of a mouse not a giant finger. Sure, Microsoft is making an attempt to make it easier but it just is not there yet.

      On the other side, I don’t want my desktop OS to be taking up unnecessary space because the tablet mode needs bigger buttons.

    • thomas nguyen

      That’s the main attractor for MS, a Computer in a tablet form and function, or a Tablet that is oversized and cost similar to their intro MacBook line?

    • sggodsell

      If Apple is trying to compete with PC/laptop market. Then they should have added expandable storage or at least put 64 gb as the minimum. Since Apple didn’t, then it is still stuck on the big iPhone world at a really high price.

      This thing is not going to do well.

    • Vito R.

      I don’t think they’re trying to compete with PCs. I think they are scaling the iPad up for people that are happy computing on an iPad.

      This is *not* a MS Surface replacement.

    • sggodsell

      You missed my point. Apple just like their iPhone 6s starts with a ridiculous amount of storage. This iPad PRO only starts at 32 gb. Your only upgrade option is to get 128 gb, there is no 64 gb option at all. Apple is at its best once again ripping people off. But clearly you don’t see that at all, because I am responding to an Apple Zealot who would purchase an Apple $hit if they sold that as well.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Go easy on Vito. At least he’s not as zealous as those Rimtards still pushing crappy Blackberry products as if they’re even remotely relevant in today’s world anymore. At least there is a debate to be had here about the relevancy of Apple’s products and where they’re geared towards. The same can’t be said about THAT other brand which can’t sell $hit.

    • Vito R.

      You said Apple it was competing with PC market and I said they weren’t. That makes me an Apple Zealot? Hahaha. Yeah, name calling makes your point sound more rational.

    • thomas nguyen

      This is *not* a Dedicated Computer replacement.

    • Vito R.

      It is not for people that use a “dedicated computer” right now – which I take to mean a desktop or laptop computer.

      I think it’s for those people who’s primary computing device is an iPad – like my mother – and for her it would most definitely make sense… if she was willing to pay the price.

    • Longtin

      Or get the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 + Keyboard and save a lot of money.

    • Vito R.

      The S2 costs more than an iPad – I personally don’t think it’s worth more than an iPad.

    • Longtin

      It’s $599.99 at the Source and the iPad Pro is $1299…. How again does this cost more? Also the iPad is $659.99.

    • Vito R.

      Try again. iPad Pro is $1049 – no need to make it more expensive than it already is 😉

      iPad Air 32GB is $489.
      iPad Air 2 16GB is $549.
      iPad Air 2 64GB is $659.

      I would take any of those before I spent $600 on a Samsung Tablet. Android on a tablet is just a subpar experience compared to iOS. There’s a reason Android sells more tablets but Apple dominates in actually usage metrics. With Samsung you’re also stuck waiting forever for OS updates if you even get any at all. No thanks. At least Apple supports their products – our old iPad 2 even got updated to iOS 9 and it works just fine.

    • Longtin

      Yet again go ahead and pay more for less value, I’m not the one wasting money and time lol

    • Vito R.

      Like I said, I personally wouldn’t “waste” my money on a Samsung tablet.

    • or buy nothing and use what you have today that works fine.

    • MassDeduction

      How are iPads big iPhones? They’re much closer to big iPod Touches, IMO.

    • Marc Palumbo

      @MassDeduction:disqus They’re all not that far apart. They run the exact same OS and the exact same apps.

  • Marc Palumbo

    Not because it’s an Apple product, but this isn’t a good review. If you want a real, honest review, direct yourself to Ars Technica. Why isn’t the single stand angle from the keyboard in the CONS? Why is he comparing it to a Surface Book most of the time? The iPad Pro competes against the Surface Pro. The iPad Pro is a weird device and tough to call it a professional device. Besides creating or doodling on it, this is just another iPad.

    I have a feeling that anyone willing to type for long periods of time will find it annoying when they need to move the cursor. Seems to be fine for browsing and sending simple emails, but not a true professional device. At least not yet. Wouldn’t be surprised if iOS X allows for mice support. You may tell me that Apple will never ever do that, but did you really think Apple would ever release a stylus? Probably not.

    • Mr Bojangles

      You mean iOS allows for mouse support because OS X is the desktop system they should’ve released. Would’ve made it a kickass device that could compete squarely with SP4 but as it stands I don’t think this iPad holds a candle to the Surface Pro in any way.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I think you’re trying to correct me, but I did say iOS X. I’m just assuming they may give it a Roman numeral. The processor alone cannot matchup against the Surface Pro 4. I guess that’s what makes the Sp4 special. But everyone will always revert back to the app ecosystem, when in fact, there are millions of applications running on Windows. And matching up against professional software, iOS is extremely limited. Worse off than OSX. I just hope that people don’t use Snapchat as a reason that it’s better than the app store on Windows 10.

      I find it difficult to determine the direction Apple wants to go because those people that have a Macbook and an iPad, will just opt for the iPad Pro and no longer consider the Macbook. They may want to cannibalize their Mac line, who knows.

      But comparing oranges with oranges, the iPad Pro cannot matchup against other professional devices like the Surface Pro 4. Let’s not even bring in the Surface Book into this.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Only trying to correct you in the sense that OS X does support mouse and peripherals whereas iOS doesn’t. That could change like you say but right now it’s just not a product that matches up against SP4 like we agree.
      If they had put a desktop OS on this it could’ve cannibalized their laptop business for sure and what amazes me is that companies like Microsoft have come out with products like the Surface Pro and Surface Book that Apple should’ve come out with a couple years ago. It doesn’t even make sense to buy a MacBook anymore considering the limitations and competing against the 2-1 devices out there. If hatred of Windows is what holds people back I invite them to try Windows 10. It is a vast improvement over previous versions for sure.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I think that eventually, Apple will add mouse support to iOS. At this point, why wouldn’t they? I would assume that the iPad Pros of the future won’t run on ARM, but on Intel. It’s just a matter of time for them. Once this is done, you can almost say goodbye to OSX. The one defining matter of iOS is its limitations. iOS taking over and giving all control to Apple scares many professionals out there. Would you think that iOS being Apple’s main operating system for all their machines would be a good thing?

    • Mr Bojangles

      There is no reason that Apple can’t incorporate touch technology into OS X like MSFT did with Windows 10. Supplanting OS X with iOS would be a huge mistake and I think could very well spell the end of their entire laptop/desktop line of products. People still want a real desktop OS experience no matter what the device and for something this size it’s almost a foregone conclusion what they should’ve done here.
      For example why didn’t they convert their Macbook line into the same 2-1 that Dell, Lenovo and now the Surface Book have long since adopted? With the ability to run a touch screen, stylus alongside the traditional keyboard/trackpad? It’s not as if it’s not within their capacity and the amount of money these guys have to invest in such a development.
      Basically Apple is no longer leading the way but rather playing catch up with the competitors and where the only argument to buy the stuff left is that OS X or iOS is more stable than Windows but lets face it and from my own experience, all OS have stability issues from time to time and Microsoft has truly upped their game the past couple years.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Well, iOS is as stable as almost any other OS. OSX is pretty solid and stable. The one thing iOS suffers from is versatility, and this is by accident. Apple is know for “making this work” with iOS because they dictate how the functionality should be. NFC payments was a great example of this. Android and Windows had this in place way before Apple came into the game. Now you have stores coming out of the woodwork with Apply Pay support.

      All that stuff is fine and dandy until the day where you’re stuck. Either way, at some point, you need a PC (mac or windows) to do something. And you won’t be able to because you’re so entrenched in iOS.

    • Mr Bojangles

      I’ve been pretty integrated into Apple’s ecosystem as is with an iMac, iPhone, iPad and two ATVs in my house but that said my decision to buy an SP4 and my first MSFT product in over 7 years is precisely because i refuse to become any more beholden to one company or ecosystem over another. I enjoy the variety now more than ever and I think it’s essential that consumer maintain a healthy distance from becoming too involved in one platform over another.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I’ll be honest. I’m shocked by your statement. Ecosystems don’t really make sense. Apple ecosystem handcuffs you (Android as well) because of lack of control. I’m glad you decided to test out Windows. I’m happy you’re enjoying it (are you?).

    • Mr Bojangles

      The ecosystem works well when integrating your devices since content isn’t always accessible across different platforms. Always a few bumps in the road.
      Yes, I am enjoying the SP4 for sure even though its a slight learning curve, many feature resemble those in El Capitan to be honest.
      Beyond that I just wish the battery life was a bit better but that’s part of the sacrifice in using a thinner, more compact model than your typical Macbook which was my previous mobile computer.

    • Vito R.

      Doesn’t the Microsoft ecosystem handcuff you as well? I’m not talking about Office which is multi-platform, but apps from the Windows Store.

      My mail/contacts/calendar are all Google and my storage is Dropbox. That’s really all I need to jump between Android and iOS because they’re multi-platform. I really don’t care if I have to spend an extra few bucks buying some games – but even most games are multi-platform now too and I can continue play on my Android or iOS device.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Windows store lol. No man. You can install any exe you want. You can be ur own admin on Windows/Linux/Mac OSX. In outlook, you can add any calendar you want, import any contact you want.

    • Vito R.

      Really? Wow. I didn’t know I could install exe on Android and iOS too!

    • Marc Palumbo

      err what? I’m not so sure you understand OSX/Windows versus iOS/Android.

    • Vito R.

      I do understand. You didn’t understand my point about being locked into an ecosystem. Windows Store or exe still locks you into Microsofts ecosystem – get it?

    • Marc Palumbo

      Not necessarily. No. There are many freedoms between OSX and Windows that iOS and Android can not be enjoyed. By you staying on the iOS ecosystem, you’re agreeing with whatever policies brought on by Apple. If Apple decides to remove any Google app on the app store because of a large scale battle between the two, you’re screwed. But you won’t be on Windows/OSX. You can do whatever you want without those restrictions. An actual example was the Pebble app for iOS. Apple was holding it in the store for a long period of time. You are forced by Apple to not be able to sync your Pebble watch to your iPhone because of X reason.

    • thomas nguyen

      umm… no… EXE is used everywhere for executable to install on any computer, similar to DMG, because of that it is just a way to run on an actual desktop, you have applications and games that releases their support for both, and if they support cloud save, or even proprietary formats, it will be available to both users on both systems. Example is photoshop, I can go download an exe to install photoshop, do my thing, save the file, and have it opened in a photoshop installed on a mac.

    • Vito R.

      Dude, I *know* what an .exe is haha. My point is that you need to buy apps for each *ecosystem* and that Windows executable files are not compatible with Mac or Android.

      The point you’re making is the same one I was making, that there are plenty of cross-platform apps out there. MS Office being the best example.

    • thomas nguyen

      yes they may not be compatible, but the software itself and the files it creates are, which is more than I can say for any mobile application. so yes you can only install an exe on a Windows OS, but the cross platform makes the software universal and does not require you to be locked in any environment.

    • thomas nguyen

      sorry, it’s hard to get your point over text.

    • thomas nguyen

      I think more about ecosystem is the investment you put into said environment, when you switch, you lose it all since it is not cross compatible, I think I read Mr Bojangles note more to the app ecosystem and investment within it, more so than integration between all the devices.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I understand the investment part, and I am not arguing the integration. What I mean is that locking yourself into iOS only leaves you vulnerable. At least with Windows or OSX, you can do as you wish and install things as you please. You cannot do that fully with iOS or Android.

    • Brad

      As a tablet, the iPad Pro blows the Surface Pro out of the water: Microsoft’s tablet mode is just Windows with touchscreen capabilities. The iPad functions much better as a tablet (I have both and almost never use tablet mode on my Surface Pro because it’s so lame).

      As a day-to-day computing device for real work (even “content creation”), the Surface Pro blows the iPad Pro out of the water. There are very few “pro” users who’d be content with the limitations of an iPad.

      If iOS and Android developers do what Microsoft hopes and start porting their apps over to Windows then the Surface will become a lot more interesting as a tablet. But the demand has to be there first, and it’s unclear whether that will materialize.

    • Vito R.

      That’s the kicker.

    • Mr Bojangles

      True enough. I admittedly use my SP4 as a laptop more than as a tablet. It’s not really lame by any means but just a different experience that takes getting used to. Otherwise it too can be unwieldy to handle in that manner.

    • Vito R.

      Did you read the same review I did? He didn’t compare it to the Surface Book at all except when he said “if you’re deciding between a laptop or a Surface Book”… Is the only thing you got from the Ars review that they didn’t like the angle the iPad sits when on the keyboard? It was a lot more comprehensive than that. They liked it and he said it was able to replace his laptop on vacation – but he doesn’t know who it’s for exactly. Which is pretty much what everyone else is saying.

      I’m going to buy one and then you can tell other people what I think of it 😉

    • Mr Bojangles

      Save yourself some money. Buy a bluetooth keyboard for a regular iPad and tell me what you think after that because frankly I doubt you’ll find much to crow about. I’ve used one with my Air 2 for the past year and while it comes in handy for many tasks I don’t think having a larger screen would make much difference to me as this is about the only selling point of the Pro model now.

    • Vito R.

      I didn’t think having a larger screen on the original iPad was worth it over the iPhone and i was wrong about that so I’m going to give it a shot.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I didn’t feel like writing a really long reply summarizing Ars’ review. I scrolled right down to the pros/cons.

      he was comparing it to the Surface Book. Bad idea. I know you’ll buy it since you’ve told me you would buy tech to try it out and return it if you didn’t. But tell me, what would be the difference for you between the iPad Air 2 and this? Would screen size alone get you to keep it?

    • Vito R.

      He *never* compared it to a Surface Book haha.

      I don’t have an Air 2, I’m interested in this because of the size/performance & multitasking. If it doesn’t “magical” I’ll return it, no big deal.

    • Marc Palumbo

      The Air 2 has multitasking. As for performance, I don’t see how running regular apps would show much of a difference. Maybe if they had force touch, it would make sense. But the pro does not.

    • Vito R.

      I know the Air 2 has multitasking. Faster loading apps, smoother playing games – faster is faster. I wouldn’t want to buy a new product that was slower – right?

      Force Touch is the real kicker. I picked up a 6S (and returned it) at launch. I really liked FT and think it will be very useful going forward – it’s good to hear that some Android OEMs are planing on implementing something similar but I hope it’s built into Android proper and not a custom thing.

      Problem is, you *know* FT is coming to the iPad at some point – maybe as early as the next release cycle. Once you’ve used it and see the value it’s tough to live without it. I think it probably makes more economic sense to wait until iPads have FT before buying one.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I can finally agree with your answer. AND, just by this post, you have just given yourself an excuse to not purchase the iPad Pro. Force Touch may be something you truly look for in iOS. It would not be a factor into me buying something.

    • Vito R.

      Why not? Force Touch is definitely the future of touch computing – would be short sighted to buy something now that didn’t support it when you know other products will have it in 12 months. I tend not to replace my tablets every year.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Sure, maybe. Right now, it’s just not a feature I need. Current app examples of Force Touch are gimmicky at the moment. Maybe the future is good for games and fart apps. We’ll see when there are better examples of this.

    • Vito R.

      It’s a right click. Windows users love right clicks don’t they 😉

    • Marc Palumbo

      C’Mon. Are you trying to tell me my purchasing decisions need to include Force Touch? That’s a secondary want versus a need. There’s a reason why it’s not on the iPad Pro. You may see it on the next iPad, but the iPad Pro may be the last device to adopt it. Especially since the iPad Pro is weird to hold because of it’s size, FT may make it weird as hell. I would need your return policy.

      Yes it’s a right click. The thought of that make me look at iOS and wonder why it may not have aged as well as others would hope for.

    • Vito R.

      Exactly, a secondary want versus a need – but something that would cross your mind 😉

    • Mr Bojangles

      But you see you have to wonder why Apple didn’t include it on the Pro model, especially in light of the emphasis on it being an enterprise grade device and the price tag here. After all they offer the optional stylus so why not Force Touch??? This is what I despise about Apple is that they deliberately hold this stuff back and then year later put it out there saying it’s so friggin great when it’s been around for over a year already. Just like they finally incorporated Touch ID on iPad mini but yet haven’t done so with the new iPod touches??? Why?

    • Marc Palumbo

      There are new iPod touches? Why?????

    • Mr Bojangles

      More nice colours and bigger storage options. ???? Put into perspective 128 GB at $500 is ridiculous considering you could’ve had a 160GB iPod Classic before they discontinued for around $260. They omitted Force Touch here too and no Touch ID so what’ the justification for the price increase? It’s ridiculous.

    • Vito R.

      I think it probably has something to do with putting force touch on something so large – it affects the weight and the glass used – lots of things that go into finding the right balance of size/weight.

      Or it could be what you said.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Well if that’s the case forget about Force Touch next year. No, I believe this is Apple’s way of stretching the ‘innovation’ gap here and it’s not the first time they’ve done this. I remember the iPhone 4 when they said you couldn’t run voice navigation in Maps unless you had the new 4S but yet if you dowloaded any number of GPS apps that had turn-by-turn directions it would work perfectly on the 4. Apple just wanted to get you buy the 4S for the gimmick of voice navigation claiming the processor couldn’t handle the tasks. LOL!

      Even the iPads are interesting that way. Only the WiFi-3G model has voice navigation but the Wi-Fi only doesn’t. It’s kinda of a joke really.

    • Vito R.

      Haha, the 4s was a lot faster than the 4. I think you’re thinking about Siri and not voice navigation?

      The 3G/LTE iPads have GPS integrated in their modem while the wifi models don’t – that’s why they have turn by turn. Besides, makes sense that you’d need a data connection for it to work.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Siri wasn’t around on the 4 model as you point out and was only a beta on the 4S. Voice navigation wasn’t available on the 4 using Apple’s new Maps app when they discontinued using Google Maps. Like I said, using any third party app it worked fine so the faster argument is specious at best.
      Ditto for building into a modem on the iPad. That’s a joke and there is no reason you can’t put it onto the Wi-Fi model and allow a person to tether to the iPhone like everything else to navigate if necessary on a larger screen. Just another excuse to get people to spend more money to buy a better model. This is Apple’s modus operandi.

    • MassDeduction

      I also right-click on my touch devices by touching and holding to bring up a context-sensitive menu (Windows phones and tablets). Force touch may or may not be cool (I haven’t tried it yet), but there are alternatives. I agree, right-clicking *somehow* is important IMO. 🙂

    • Vito R.

      It works very well.

      Apple & Google have been tap and hold as a right click as well, but Force Touch is different, better. It is a separate function from tap and hold. I think Force Touch will be used for additional options – and other things i haven’t even thought of – and tap and hold will be relegated to a click and drag type of scenario.

    • Mr Bojangles

      The Air 2 offers the same full multitasking this does. Split view, PnP, side view are all very nice features but also bear in mind a limited number of apps work with that stuff. You can’t run a Youtube video in PnP yet for example nor in a split view. That is until Google updates their app to make it compatible which I’m surprised they haven’t yet.
      Don’t get me wrong, the enhancements in iOS 9 are great but I can do much the same on an SP4 and a lot more from the multitask perspective.

    • Vito R.

      It does, but the Pro is bigger and faster. I don’t know what value I put on that until I try it. I’m thinking that I’ll probably not keep it, but I want to try it.

      The Surface Pro 4 is a much better *work* machine – that is not in question. But the iPad Pro is a much better *tablet* as we’ve come to understand a tablet to be over the past 5 years.

      For me, I don’t think either could replace my laptop just because it’s so convenient and easy to throw on my lap and type on and not worry about angles and what not.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Yes, the iPad as a tablet is certainly more adept at that function however at nearly 13 inches this is too big to hold and handle the same way. It’s fine if you intend to use as a tablet propped up on a stand or keyboard but to carry around it’s just a lot less appealing. It’s more certainly a stationary tablet.

    • Vito R.

      I’m saying I don’t know what I will use it for. Seems excessive to just use it for streaming Plex, maybe it will be good for other things? I really don’t know, we’ll see, I’ll let you know how it goes.

      The only thing holding me back from getting a Surface Pro 4 is the fact that I use my iPad most at home. If the iPad Pro doesn’t work out I’m probably going to hold out until next year’s iPads come out with Force Touch and a keyboard accessory.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Force Touch is a gimmick in my view and hardly a necessity for greater functionality of a device. You could wait another year but if you think it’s going to improve much I doubt it. FT may be about the only thing these guys include in next year’s iPad models but really for most people it’s just not a necessity nor will anyone really notice discernible improvement in performance for the vast majority of tasks they do with these devices.

    • Vito R.

      Force Touch is not a gimmick, I’ve used it. It is a genuinely useful feature. On the Apple Watch it doesn’t really serve a purpose, but on the phone it is a really nice feature to have and will be more so in the future.

    • Mr Bojangles

      But it’s just that, a feature that’s nice but hardly the ‘future of computing’ as you put it. Being able to depress a screen more to bring up a menu is hardly something that people need but Apple is very good at pushing the hype around that. I do however see it as potentially useful playing games on devices but that’s another niche for those into iOS gaming apps.
      For things like word processing, surfing, emailing, playing back video/audio content, basically the main purpose of these devices for most users, it’s a feature that you’d sparingly use.
      That said, if you’re in the market for an iPad and don’t have one already then you may think it’s worth the extra wait. For those that already have newer iPads it’s not a reason to toss aside a $700 piece of hardware to buy another $700 piece of hardware because I can 3D touch.

    • Vito R.

      It’s a right click. A right click is something i find very useful on my computing devices. Apple found a way to bring it to touchscreen devices – it isn’t going away, it’s only going to become more common.

    • Mr Bojangles

      I can right click using a Surface pen as well and yet curiously I don’t use it that much either despite it being a ‘neat feature’
      It’s a novelty and while not going away as you say it’s not revolutionary either.

    • Marc Palumbo

      I kinda cringed when he said future of computing. I think he meant near future.

    • sggodsell

      Your right it is going to become more common, but it is going to take a lot of time for everyone to buy new devices. Not to mention its going to take more time for developers to get on board and create either new apps or modify existing apps to add in 3D touch capabilities. Many developers and their apps if they work just fine without 3D touch, then its that old adage of, if its not broke, then don’t fix it. A number of apps could benefit from 3D touch, but then a lot of apps could care less. Also remember developers have to support NON 3D touch first and foremost, because they still make up the vast majority of devices. You are also forgetting that 3D touch is just one more aspect for a user to input data. Even then its just one tiny element to add to the already existing touch input.

    • Vito R.

      Exactly. It’s not required, but if you have a device with 3D Touch support it’s very handy. The beauty of it is that it’s additional functionality – just a shortcut that doesn’t take away from the existing paradigm but improves upon it.

    • sggodsell

      It most certainly is, because developers are not on board with it. They are the ones that have to make the apps in order to take advantage of force touch. Until then, it is a gimmick.

    • Vito R.

      Um, developers *are* on board with it. Just look at all the apps that have already been updated to support it in the last month. A month it’s been out haha.

    • sggodsell

      You make it sound like all the developers and their apps are going to use 3D touch. Hardly any apps or developers are doing that. First of all developers have to find a use case in order to introduce 3D touch into their app. Not to mention your app has to support the vast majority of NON 3D touch iOS devices. You really have no clue. Not to mention you are showing the world that you have no development skills. Get back to me when you actually make apps.

    • Vito R.

      Haha, you’re just being your usual antagonist self spewing nonsense instead of facts. How does a right click work? Is it a requirement? There are lots of applications for a force touch that will allow quick actions and save time for users that have a device that supports it. You make it easy for everybody to see who the one with no clue really is 😉

    • sggodsell

      I have made a ton of programs and apps in my lifetime. So how many iOS devices currently have 3D touch. Please fill me in since you think I am clueless? So how many? Now how many iPads, iPods, or iPhones do not have 3D touch. Well don’t bother its real easy. No iPods, or IPads have 3D touch, and only the current iPhone 6s/6s+, Apple Watch have 3D touch. So it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that you still have to support NON 3D touch devices first and foremost, since they make up the vast majority of the devices and customers. But clearly you need someone to show you how wrong you really are.

    • Vito R.

      Excuse me Mr. Professional Programmer, maybe you’ve heard of some of these companies (or maybe not) – Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Twitter – they but a few companies that have added 3D Touch support for their iOS apps. They have *real* software engineers working for them (not people just pretending to be professional programmers) and they know how to add support for new functionality that is helpful for hardware that supports it yet not mandatory for hardware that doesn’t.

      As you may or may not know, this feature was released a little over a month ago and it takes time for developers to add 3D Touch to their apps but I’d say it’s off to a good start. With over 200K iOS developers, you can bet they won’t all support it, but all the popular apps will. Each developer will have to make their own decisions as to when the right time to support a new feature is – but support it they will.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Actually you’re wrong. I’ve seen many app updates over the past few months supporting 3D touch on the iPhone and developers are always keen to support the latest hardware upgrades that Apple deploys. That’s a fact however its utilitarian value is in question here and whether it’s really a necessity. To some a must have. For others like myself no big deal for now.

    • sggodsell

      Wow, clearly you are not a developer. First of all you have to find a use case for an app to introduce 3D touch. BTW it is just one more input aspect. Second your app must support the NON 3D touch users which still make up the majority of iOS users. Third there is not a lot of apps that support it. All you are doing is proving that you really don’t know your head from your @$$. Sorry, what you are proving is that you really are an Apple Zealot.

    • Rio

      lol, some of your points are just silly. With your thinking a developer would be stuck in the early 2000’s making apps that did not take any advantage of the advances in technology.

      First of all you have to find a use case for an app to introduce 3D touch. BTW it is just one more input aspect.

      – So when the gyroscope was introduced to phones, developers shouldn’t have thought of new ways to take advantage of this technology?

      Second your app must support the NON 3D touch users which still make up the majority of iOS users.

      – Same point here, developers should not take time to take advantage of this new tech that will be used in all future iPhone platforms?

      Third there is not a lot of apps that support it

      – It has only less than 2 months, give it a year atleast.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Get a grip man. You don’t need to be a developer to see the vast number of updates and the notes attached to see that they are embracing 3D Touch. I’ve been quite critical here today about this device if you bothered to review my comments on the thread so I’m no Apple zealot. You however are clearly a major hater without any perspective whatsoever. You developing BB apps by any chance? Lol.

    • monkeymo

      wow your the biggest pain in the but to companies, lets just have to take a loss on a product cause some dude just wants to use new devices, not necessarily ours but he wants to use it causes its new regardless.

    • Vito R.

      What does that even mean? I like technology, if something new and cool comes out I buy it because I want it. Why should I care who makes it if it fits my needs? If however it doesn’t meet my expectations then I will return it. What’s wrong with that?

      And ALL companies would love it if you bought their products.

    • monkeymo

      You clearly state that you will return it within 2 weeks, the average purchaser doesnt go to bestbuy and say ill buy it for 2 weeks and IF it really is good ill actually keep it. How you described your purchasing process rather than finding fault to return it, you have the mentality of trying to find use of their product during the 2 weeks of purchase. If you did the research you wouldnt have to trial it for 2 weeks, and cause the retailer and manufacturer losses.

    • Vito R.

      Most of the products I buy I keep. I said will return it in two weeks if I don’t like it – what more research do I have to do aside from reading reviews? I am interested in this product so I will buy it. Not sure why I need to be 100% certain I will be happy with something before I buy it – most if not ALL vendors (especially Apple) are very happy for you to buy something from them and return it “if you are not completely satisfied”. Don’t worry, Apple is not losing any money on me. I do not purchase every product that’s released just to return it two weeks later. The iPad Pro isn’t cheap, so you can bet I’m going to make damn sure it’s useful to me if I’m going to spend that much money on it.

      However, if you buy something that you’re not happy with by all means, feel free to keep it.

  • J.S.Bach

    “position the iPad Pro as more than just an oversized iPad”

    – except it is just an oversized iPad with modest specs and a mobile OS. If they want to impress people follow Microsoft’s lead and use a desktop OS that actually lets you work. I guess this is just an iPad for people with poor vision.

    • Marc Palumbo

      iPad for old people

  • marshallpower

    A laptop replacement…this is a joke right…where can I plug in my 2tb hdd and my DVD burner? So many many cons in this review, it’s not even subtle…as always…

    • Kris

      Most certainly not a laptop replacement but MS is known for its fawning reviews of Apple products in general. Hard to figure what the target market is for this thing because for reading, watching movies, emailing and surfing the web it’s far too unwieldy to hold like the smaller models. Put another way, for content consumption it’s far from ideal. For content creation it has limitations that any mobile OS would have and will hobble its appeal until there are more enterprise apps to support this but relying too heavily on an app ecosystem to push content creation here is far from ideal either.

      A serious enterprise/business user will give the Surface Pro a much harder look at these prices than an iPad Pro.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Thank you! All I’ve heard is.. “It’s for content creators, you don’t understand”. But I do understand and like you just said, it’s limited. Macbooks are more ideal for Apple content creators. Why even buy this?

    • Brad Fortin

      Yeah! And where can I plug in my 5.25″ floppy drive? And where’s the SCSI connector? And the PS/2 connector? And VGA? I bring all my devices and peripherals with my laptop, which is why any coffee table I sit at becomes a spider web of cables, dongles, and adapters, so why couldn’t Apple think of people like me?

    • marshallpower

      Wow is that all you could find? They claim to be a laptop replacement, don’t blame me. If you think I’m going to use the cloud for 10TB of data, you’re wrong.

    • southerndinner

      He’s an apologist

  • Itoldyouso

    So how does the I Pad Pro stack up against Samsung Note Pro 12.2? The Note Pro coming with a pen and a cost of 650$.

    • Marc Palumbo

      In all fairness, the Note Pro came with a Snapdragon 800. Not ideal for today’s standards.

    • Itoldyouso

      Well yeah, it is a bit dated. But it is still on the market. Does the I Pad Pro offer really that much more functionality? And is it really worth paying 530 CAD more for it?

    • Marc Palumbo

      I’m still trying to figure out why someone would buy it. As a professional device, I wouldn’t buy the iPad Pro or the Note Pro. Even for a content creator, it doesn’t make sense. Maybe I’m just not understanding…

    • Mr Bojangles

      Maybe if you’re an artist or possibly an engineer that wants to run AutoCAD on this thing (if it can which I think its capable) you’d find this useful. For just about anything else it’s a dime among a dozen other competitive devices out there.

    • Marc Palumbo

      AutoCAD? No lol. I really wouldn’t. A strong Windows PC is meant for this. If I was an engineer, I wouldn’t go close to it.

    • Mr Bojangles

      I know one guy that uses AutoCAD that thinks this will fit the bill but will wait to see if he buys and uses it for that successfully. The A9X processor here is admittedly nothing to sneeze at.

    • Marc Palumbo

      The A9X is comparable to the Core M. I would rather have an i5/i7

    • Mr Bojangles

      Then basically you’re better off betting the SP4 base model.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Just comparing the processor alone, then yes. Benchmarks will tell you that the i5/i7’s are better. Maybe some people here on MobileSyrup will tell you otherwise, but don’t let them fool you from numbers.

    • Vito R.

      I don’t think anyone here will say that an A9x has better performance that a current gen i5 or i7.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Yes. I can find you 1 guy that will challenge it.

    • Vito R.

      So what? I can find you more than one person that thinks Windows Phone or BB10 are better OSs than Android or iOS – didn’t mean that’s a common opinion. You can always find *someone* that will talk nonsense.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. He might be reading this. I think in a couple hours, he’s going to come in here like a wrecking ball (except he looks nothing like Miley)

    • thomas nguyen

      no true autocad app for ios

    • Itoldyouso

      I own a Note Pro and use it mostly to read (works well with pdf files), watch the occasional show on Netflix and surf the internet. With the bigger screen it is also easier to use some apps (e.g. dictionary). Neither device is good for any professional work. It is a lot faster and easier to do it on a Laptop. Just my 2 cents.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Yup, I’ll completely agree with that. The Note pro is perfect for that. I guess the term “pro” is used so loosely, it’s lost any meaning.

  • norsem4n

    What a nice extra large iphone / iphone… big deal.

  • Why would anyone want this over Surface Pro 4 or even a SP3?

  • seraidi

    I simply don’t get why the iPad Pro is being compared to the Surface Pro 4 in all reviews that I did read today.
    This thing should be compared to the Surface 3 IMHO, and even then the S3 can do much more and comes with many “useful” ports and is open to the whole and broader Windows Applications ecosystem, and it costs way less…

    I love Apple products, but this iPad Pro is just way overpriced and very limited compared to what the Surface 3 can do.

  • Ricky Firth

    Typical Mobilesyrup review..

    Anything Apple is Gold.

    • Croc Ography

      Yes but they just recently became this way, they actually used to be good with their reviews.

    • Ricky Firth

      Yea, it’s too bad!

    • monkeymo

      Its The Verge effect, they even (poorly) copied the font text and filming aesthetic as The Verge Reviews. The only difference is that mobilesyrup has bad background music/noise in their videos. They pan way to much and have bad setups for their shots.

      They are nailing the Apple is all mighty part that the verge is getting beaten up on as of late.

  • jones19876

    I find it interesting that so many reviews focus heavily on the hardware, which is of course great and really not a concern – the software part, especially the OS, is where I do worry this product isn’t such a great solution. Using iOS in a work environment, with access to network services and assets and such, doesn’t fare well – iOS is great for using iCloud or 3rd-party consumer stuff, but for enterprise it’s severely lacking. And herein lies the huge question mark: what’s so “pro” about it? At the end of the day, I see a larger version of the iPad we already know and love, but not much else.

    • Kris

      I see a ploy to keep a product alive that is sagging sales and where people don’t find it necessary or compelling to upgrade every year like they do iPhones. It’s not a game changer nor a serious threat to things like the Surface Pro which blows this out of the water on nearly every score for productivity.

    • Vito R.

      Nah, you’re wrong. This isn’t targeting the same market as the iPad. People who buy a $500 iPad aren’t going to upgrade to a $1000 iPad. It’s a niche product and not one that’s going to have any affect on declining tablet sales.

      I think it’s more of a test balloon for them.

  • thomas nguyen

    “Bezels above the display have been reduced to the same extent that the side bezels were with the iPad Air” – looks like the same size bezel to me.

    “But I quickly realized that the enforced window management of having two apps side by side in either a 50/50 or 75/25 split made it easy to rethink the way I worked, since I was only given two options” yes, makes you rethink they way you work but not in a good way. I don’t believe losing multitasking is ever a good thing when working.

  • KiwiBri

    I wish this had FULL OSX on it.. then I would get my desire… A Touch Screen MacBook. Oh Well

    • Vito R.

      It’s coming. Don’t know when, but I’m sure it will be here one day…

    • Marc Palumbo

      I wouldn’t bet on this. Not really the way Apple operates. I would bet on iOS being their main computing OS for the future. There’s more appeal to iOS than OSX.

    • Kris

      Not really Marc. We are all well aware of the inherent limitations of iOS and right now that isn’t being addressed either in iOS 9 or this new iPad. Side view, split view etc. is really a poor excuse for the real thing and to suggest iOS will replace OS X is absurd unless you think the Mac line is going all touch screen and I just don’t see that on the horizon any time soon. Also, there are just too many programs that people can run on a desktop that iOS doesn’t support and that also isn’t likely to change big time for now.
      Apple will be sticking with OS X unless they decide to discontinue making laptops and desktops altogether.

    • Vito R.

      Here’s where I’d argue you’re wrong. For a LOT of people a tablet is their main computing device. That might not work for you or for I, but it in fact is the case. What computing looked like the past 30 years is not what it’s going to look like in the next 30.

      I’m not saying i prefer restricted approach of iOS, I’m just saying it’s more than fine for a great number of people. It’s very similar to the gaming crowd that think everyone needs a $800 discrete graphics card and a water-cooled CPU when in reality, most people are fine with integrated graphics.

      Ive used the iPad Pro almost exclusively this weekend. I used Excel, Word, Safari, Skype – split screen works very well and it was more than sufficient. I missed not having a mouse but this being the first time I used Excel for iOS I was surprised at how robust it is. This could definitely be the a main computer for a lot of people – once the price comes down. Currently it’s just too expensive for what it is.

    • Marc Palumbo

      Things will just happen this way. It may be a difficult thing to understand now, but iPads will catch up to Macs at some point. Just read the review that The Verge did on the iPad Pro from the perspective of a designer. Actually, all you need to do is read the last line.

      “For designers specifically, there are definitely limitations around working with mobile creativity apps, not fully powered desktop versions. But I hope the apps will continue to improve and match the desktop experiences that I have now. I’m not there yet, but it wouldn’t surprise me if one day I swapped my MacBook Pro for something like the iPad Pro.”

      Remove the spaces between . and com

      http://www.theverge . com/2015/11/13/9728140/ipad-pro-apple-pencil-stylus-adobe-draw-sketch-comp

  • HelloCDN

    Well, at least they’re not offering 16GB as a starting point anymore…. It’s great a device though, if you want a large iPad and have extra cash. In terms of working on it – no. Doing basic working tasks – may be, but not real working. Not until iOS is capable of handling true multi-tasking. Tim Cook was to quick to declare PC dead – which is ridiculous, considering that their Mac division has been growing and iPad sales are declining.

  • Longtin

    “The company has always been conservative with its iPad battery estimates.” It’s been different in my experience since the iPhone 4 and original iPad; however like you claimed you didn’t watch any videos. I personally think that’s where the battery life falls off with the Apple products. Most people would agree that they do in fact watch videos on there tablet; either being youtube, facebook videos, nhl games, even netflix. It will last significantly less than what they claim.

    Also I was always wondering why they limit themselves to dual core, how much faster would it be if they had Quad Core? Unless they are saving it for the iPad Pro 2.

    • Vito R.

      More cores=more power. They are already fast enough.

    • Kris

      Very true. This has been Apples main gimmick selling point for awhile now. Upping the processor power but really few notice any difference whatsoever.

    • Vito R.

      Haha, you mean Apple is the only company that makes their products faster? I guess you don’t know much about the history of computers – but thanks for your valuable input.

      Also, you missed my point. Apple’s dual core processors are efficient enough that they don’t need quad or octa core – until they are actually required and not as a gimmick for a check box on a sales sheet. Apple rarely details their processor specs as it’s unnecessary – they just say it’s twice as fast or whatever. Everyone else trumpeta “quad core” or whatever.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Kris is right in that the processor power or chipsets is nothing revolutionary in computers, especially in today’s market. What differentiates the iPad Pro from other iPads really? Size and a stylus? Big deal.

    • Vito R.

      No, he’s wrong in claiming that it’s solely an Apple “gimmick”. Faster is always better – computing moves forward. Speed improvements are not an Apple exclusive.

      That said, yeah, pretty much that’s it. Size and speed and a really nice keyboard accessory. What differentiates a Note 5 from a Galaxy S6 or an iPhone Plus from an iPhone? Size. Having used an iPad Pro for the last few days i can tell you that size matters. I much prefer using the bigger iPad. It’s faster and bigger and multitasking is great on the bigger screen.

      Is it worth the money? I don’t think so, but if you’ve got money burning a hole in your pocket it’s a great device.

      I also picked up a Surface Pro 4 today, it’s really nice too – but the similarities end there. While the form factors are similar, they are two very different devices. I’m not yet sure which one suits my needs best.

    • Mr Bojangles

      Seems like you must have quite a bit of cash to burn buying both an iPad Pro and a Surface Pro. lol! You must’ve spent over $3500 on this stuff. I congratulate you on the SP4 purchase but you’ve more or less admitted the IPP isn’t worth the money for what you’re getting and that I think is the main point detractors like myself and others are pointing out.

    • Vito R.

      Yeah, I think the iPad Pro is currently expensive relative to the iPad Air 2. I think the US price is also a little high – but because of the exchange rate there’s a much bigger difference between the two here. I think $200-300 more for the iPad Pro seems reasonable to me.

      Yeah, I didn’t like the idea of buying the iPad Pro without also giving the Surface a shot. In the end I think they’ll probably both be going back. If I keep the iPad I’ll be exchanging it for the 32GB model and if I decide to keep the Surface I’ll likely return that too in favour of a the SP3 (with twice the RAM and storage) but with the new type cover.

    • Vito R.

      Hold that thought… I’m using the iPad Pro at work today and the first thing I noticed is that the Excel file I was using on the Surface yesterday that was slow and choppy is running fast and smooth on the iPad Pro. This goes to what I was saying before – to get the best performance out of the Surface you need to buy the most expensive model where as the base model iPad Pro works just as good as the most expensive one.

      Don’t get me wrong, it’s still very pricey (for an iPad) and less versatile (as a portable computer) – but I’m just surprised that it outperforms a Core i5 Surface Pro 4 (in Excel).

  • David Rawlins

    “….the iPad Pro is almost as good as the laptops it will eventually replace.” – Wow dude…. You know how bad that sounds right? The lack of peripheral connectivity alone places this device WELL
    outside of a laptop replacement for the majority of users I would think… I mean you are stepping far outside the review category and right into PR person. I’m not even considering a iPad Pro but I kept hearing how biased MS (Daniel Bader) was towards Apple products. After checking this out I went back and looked at a few more reviews and can now definitely confirm that bias.

    On the a previous Note 4 review:
    “Its processor is fast, but no more so than the Galaxy S6’s; its S Pen is, to a ***small number of loyal users***, a technical marvel, but it’s not a big enough leap from even two years ago to justify an upgrade”

    I’ve got nothing against Apple. I think they make great products. But I like my reviews to be a least mostly unbiased. This fawning attitude has turned me off of Mobile Syrup (at least regarding its reviews). Time to find a new site.

    • Croc Ography

      Not just you, a bunch of loyal readers have been complaining about this lately. It seems as though all the writers are just mac PR people.

  • Mr_Smoosh

    “But I quickly realized that the enforced window management of having two apps side by side in either a 50/50 or 75/25 split made it easy to rethink the way I worked, since I was only given two options. ”

    This cracks me up- “Thanks Apple, for forcing me to work within your limitations. Less thinking for me!”

    No one turns a negative into a positive for apple like Daniel can. It’s reviews like this that are dragging his other bloggers down with him in credibility.

    PS- clearly you’ve never used or understand a Surface, if you think it needs a keyboard to function up to it’s potential.

    • Mr Bojangles

      In fairness the Surface works better with the keyboard for many typing intensive tasks but that said I agree with you. I’ve been using mine about 50/50 with keyboard and then just in tablet mode with the pen. Enjoy both

  • Kris

    The Logitech keyboard seems to be the better alternative here than the typical Apple accessory, alot of which are junk to begin with and overpriced to boot. That said this isn’t a laptop killer and it never will be. Without a full desktop OS experience and the multitasking that allows this is nothing more than an oversized iPad with the ability to draw using a pen. Keyboards for iPad have been around for since the product’s inception 5 years ago.
    It’s interesting watching Apple flail around since the passing of Steve Jobs and the products they are rehashing that were essentially his vision. Not much new has come from this company the past 3-4 years and its amusing watching the likes of Tim Cook rave on about how Microsoft has it all wrong when in fact they are leading the way with their product line and Apple is merely playing catch up.