Smartphone wars: iOS and Android accounted for 92% of smartphone shipments in Q4

Daniel Bader

January 28, 2013 11:54 am


If you think RIM is going to have an easy time penetrating the smartphone market with its BlackBerry 10 platform, Google and Apple would like to point out the latest smartphone shipment figures from Q4 2012. According to Strategy AnalyticsAndroid and iOS accounted for 92% of worldwide smartphone shipments in the last quarter, and over 85% over the course of 2012. Considering the number of total number shipped nearly doubled, from 490 million in 2011 to 700 million in 2012, the increase, especially on the part of Android, is even more astounding.

Android smartphones comprised 70% of all smart devices shipped in Q4, amounting to 152.1 million for the three-month span. iPhones made up much of the rest, coming in at 47.8 million devices shipped, or 22% total.

While these numbers are quite impressive on their own, what they tell us indirectly is that the smartphone game is becoming more of a two-horse race than any time in recent history. While Symbian was the predominant player for much of the early 2000’s, Nokia has slipped back to the single-digit percentage mark as the company has transitioned to Windows Phone. Similarly, RIM’s BlackBerry OS platform has also dropped to single-digit market share in larger markets such as the U.S. and Asia.

With that said, RIM’s return to the market with BlackBerry 10 will be inevitably fraught with some growing pains as the company struggles to convince recent adopters of Android and iOS devices to return to the fold they were once so loyal to. It will be very interesting to see what this chart looks like a year from now.

screen-shot-2013-01-28-at-11-12-09Source: Strategy Analytics
Via: Techcrunch

 

  • skazzberry

    rip sp!

    • sp

      rip skazzberry troll supreme!!

      good to know you miss me that much… but i dont ride side saddle so… no thanks for your thoughts.

    • Sony? No thanks!

      “If you think RIM is going to have an easy time penetrating the smartphone market with its BlackBerry 10 platform”…

      -Actually NOBODY thinks about RIM anymore. RIM’s market share is so low now that it doesn’t compete with the olde Windows or Symbian…it just becomes “OTHERS” when you see the market share distributions.

      -The only potential buyers of BB10-phones SOME of the current RIM users, add to that the fact that most of the people updated phones during holidays and got contract for 18-24 months(rest of the World) or three in Canada and you will see that RIM has an uphill battle to win.

      -Price is of the essence: if they DON”T price themselves lower than the competition they will simply be sending more users towards Adnroid and iOS ( Just See the Windows prices LOL!)

      Good luck RIM you are going to need that, A FIRM date for the phones and a LOWER price than the competition. In any case RIM still has THREE quarters to define its survival.

  • Tom

    This could be good for RIM. It is widely reported that the carriers want more options – two is not enough and the popularity of Android could give Google (and Samsung?) too much clout.

    The danger for RIM is that they took too long and now WinPhone is already making inroads as that 3rd option. RIM has responded by making BES support iOS, Android, and BB10, but not WP8.

    It seems to me like it’s now a battle between WP8 and BB10 for third place.

    • Dan

      To me this shows that WP8 hasn’t made any inroads at all.

  • iphoneee

    if it’s not bb10, why would i care?

  • Hilman

    Others combined at a pathetic 7.9%, ouch!

  • Nobel

    As a Canadian, I wish RIM would succeed. However, I am afraid they are almost finished. There will be some sales for BB10, but not significantly enough to keep them in the market for long time.

    Apple will follow RIM’s path eventually for overpriced products and not for inventing anything new. Samsung showed some good prospects with curved display technology.

    • GrapeApe

      Curved display showed nothing that would be anywhere before 2015 at best.

      They’ve showed flexible OLEDs before and it didn’t magically deliciously appear overnight either.

      Samsung knows their dominance is in a cariety of designs and in having control of the supply chaing for the best processors and memory, where intel is their biggest long term threat there and Qualcomm their biggest short term threat.

      But curved displays don’t make a killer device on their own, and definitely nowhere near a relevant timeframe.

    • Fartknocker

      Sony and Philips both showed off curved display tech long before Samsung did it at CES this year, hell, Sony’s rolled into a scroll. Maybe one day people will realize that Samsung is the worst for taking others inventions and claiming them as their own and stop buying their overhyped garbage.

  • Michael

    The smartphone race is far from over, individuals are yet to purchase their first smartphone and even among smartphone users people can move to another OS, Windows phone is becoming more popular and as Windows 8 grows on desktop many people will choose the Windows ecosystem. Windows 8 is a culture shock much like windows 95 was but after the learning curve its a smooth from there on out.

    • glonq

      Yours is a common windows fanboy delusion, and it gets less and less plausible every month.

    • TP

      Windows 8 mobile platform (Windows Phone 8 or Windows 8 RT) has nothing to do with Windows 8 for desktop.
      NONE of Windows 8 programs for desktop will run on your WinPhone or Windows 8 RT.

  • David

    Great good for them, too bad for the customers, missing out the best phones out there.. Still can’t get over how much I’m enjoying WP8, so glad I made the #switch. Best of luck to all for 2013!

    • Hilman

      What exactly are people missing out on? If its the lack of apps and ugly interface, then yes, you are correct.

      Android phones running Jelly Bean >>>>> ICS >>>>>>>>>>> WP8
      Widgets >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Live Tiles

  • EvanKr

    Wow… That’s like 20 Android activations every second.

  • Frank

    I think if anything, (for the near future at least), RIMs best shot is being able to solidify themselves in 3rd – and beat out Windows Phone. Time will tell if they can go head to head with Android or iOS.

    • GrapeApe

      RIM’s biggest challenge is keeping up with hardware developments. This launch is fine and will regain them a ton of pent-up Crackberry fanboi desire, but the thing is they need to sustain it, and 2 year product cycles don’t work for that.
      Even Apple is feeling the challenge of the tick-tock refresh in the quick pace of an Android world, and if it’s affecting Apple’s competitiveness then RIM is in far worse shape having very little money for R&D and hardware development costs.

  • Felix

    Unlike Microsoft/Nokia Blackberry does not need to penetrate anybody’s market!!!!!

    They will be selling into their already established customer base first!

    Just my opinion…

    • Mexico Ron

      Maybe. But once both of those guys have bought theirs and the market is saturated, what next?

    • sp

      80 billion users was it?

      if even half of those upgrade to BB10… i think they will be just fine.

    • Brad F

      80 billion lol. where does the other 73 billion people on earth live?

    • sp

      oops lol… pressed b instead of m

      80 million

    • sp

      @Brad F – they live in China and India… just unaccounted for. As if you had to ask…

  • Miknitro

    Always room and time for a competent and competitive Os to enter the fray.
    My guess is,
    BB10 will wipe floor with WP and push out further into the OS abyss.

    Signed,a Android user.

  • Keith

    Something is fishy about that report because if you search for Nokia 2012-q4 results you’ll find they reported smartphone sales of 15.9M alone so the 17.1M figure for all others cannot possibly be right.

    • daveloft

      In Q4, Nokia sold 4.4 million Lumia smartphones, 9.3 million Asha full-touch ‘smartphones’ and 2.2 million Symbian ‘smartphones’.

      I know Nokia would like to consider them all smartphones, but I only consider the Lumia series to be a true modern smartphone.

      My guess is this chart only includes Android, iOS, Windows Phone and Blackberry OS.

  • Fred

    The problem with these stats is they do not mention regional variances. In Canada as an example I’d bet BB has a larger footprint percentage wise then say in the USA. Same can be said for some countries in Asia where infrastructure and ownership/operating casts make the others (Android, iOS) prohibitive to large segments of the population.

  • Kriilin Namek

    Y’know, all this I’m reading reminds me of when Android entered the fray not that long ago. I wouldn’t write RIM off for dead yet, don’t underestimate the corporate foundation. As for the hardware refresh cycle, once I get my phone, I’m locked in anyways, I’d rather have a company keep updating MY phone for longer than three weeks! I’m Android right now, but if my apps are in RIM, I may make the leap.

    • HiKsFiles

      Agreed … totally!

  • Down Like Pacquiao

    RIM sold 6.9M in the last Quarter of 2012. and 7.4M the quarter before. So 14.4M in half the year. Even if they had the same numbers before they only account for about 30-35M of the 85M… Ouch boys!!!

  • Dalex

    This is definately not a bad thing for RIM by any means. It just shows there is a duopoly right now (and that’s being generous to IOS, its almost an Android monopoly which is coming up on 75% world market share). Carriers and consumers will want different options. IOS has been stale for a while and even Android is getting slightly dull.

    RIM has an established consumer base, will launch with quite a large collection of apps for a new platform, because they released their SDK a long time ago (*cough* unlike those geniouses at Microsoft *cough*), and has a solid handset in the Z10.

    • KimJong-iil

      iOS is stale and android is dull, but BB10 is exciting because ?

      And the established consumer base is less than 7.9% market ?

  • Mark M

    Switched from iPhone to Note II. Apparently many others have too. For me, one simple reason: SCREEN SIZE! Anybody at Apple listening?

  • Alison

    I think the BB will do fine at the corporate level, better than most people think. There is a significant reluctance for ITS departments of major corporations to switch away from BB. The reason being 1) BB infrastructure is already established, 2) the ITS people have already been trained to maintain it, 3)the BB platform is still the most secure and 4) the platform of Android and Apple are still unproven at the corporate enterprise level. The 1) and 2) alone constitutes to an obstacles to change platform. It is true that Apples and Android dominates the consumer smartphone market; the BB still have stronghold in the enterprise market. The only serious lacking in the BB platform is a smooth internet experience. Games – corporations/your bosses don’t care. As long as BB10 can provide a better internet and GPS experience, has the buy in from the existing corporation base, they can maintain the existing and win back more corporation clients. BB can live on that life line.