TELUS introduces a new NFC-enabled SIM, will be ‘used for mobile banking services’

Ian Hardy

October 8, 2013 2:14pm

Paying for various items via your mobile device has had a slow uptake in Canada. Rogers and CIBC were first to market to offer Canadians the option to easily pay for small ticket items via the suretap/CIBC mobile banking app, but it looks like TELUS might be up next.

According to an internal doc we received it states that TELUS will be launching a new NFC (Near Field Communication) enabled SIM card that ‘will allow for the over-the-air installation and storage of payment credentials used for mobile banking services.’ This new SIM will be available on October 10th, currently compatible with the BlackBerry Bold 9900 and Samsung Galaxy S3, costs $15 and will work on TELUS’ LTE and HSPA+ network.

Making payments will work in a similar fashion as how Rogers and CIBC operates. Customers will have to have a ‘credit card with an eligible financial institution’ and download the mobile banking app. The doc also notes the possibility of several banking partners by stating ‘Additional details on eligible banks will be made available upon service launch.’


Update: This new SIM card is now available to purchase through TELUS, both in-store and online. TELUS confirms that the “new SIM is mandatory and required for use with TELUS’ mobile payment service” and that “the NFC SIM allows storage of secure credentials required to use mobile payment services.”

Unfortunately, the finer details of using the ‘TELUS’ mobile payment service’ is still unknown – like official launch date, banking partners, etc.


(Thanks tipster!)

  • Many

    It’s exactly the same as rogers with a choice of only two phones, which you probably would say that these phones are already passé. Can we please get more smart phone choices for mobile payments

    • Nitin Gaba

      Rogers also has all Z10 devices as of a few days ago but not sure if that helps a lot… kind of confused why it works on s3 but not s4 :s

    • Many

      Thanks I didn’t see that z10 was available for this, as for helping I wish it did but since I don’t see blackberry lasting I’m not interested in those but if nexus 5, samsung 4 or samsung 5 which is probably less then 5 months of being released or a lg phone or htc one or max had it, that would become my next phone.

    • John Peters

      Q10 is now also supported by Rogers.

  • Yulet

    CIBC with Rogers, RBC with Bell, then who’s with TELUS? I don’t think TD is that much technological. BMO/Scotiabank? I hope not!

    • ITCanWork

      these are such stupid combinations, what are the chances a customer is using the right combination of provider/bank

    • HelloCDN

      True Canadian combinations. These guys have no clue how to create great services for the market, they just see what happens in the world and follow up in a typical, superlimited Canadian manner.

    • Plazmic Flame

      Exactly, it’s really dumb.

    • Plazmic Flame

      It will be TD…… why? Simply put… colors. I present to you the evidence of logo colors:

      Red = Rogers / CIBC
      Blue = Bell / RBC
      Green = Telus / TD

      Fortunately, I don’t have a bank account with either of those banks. PC Financial for life!

      My work is done here…
      *walks off into sunset*

    • Sweet

      I was thinking the exact same thing. :-)

    • steve

      PC Financial is CIBC Lol

    • Plazmic Flame

      Yup, I know that. Thank god the banking rules aren’t the same though.

    • Jesse Laurin

      I figured Blue = BMO, everything they do is blue, and ive hardly even heard of RBC

    • Astrobon

      Rarely heard of the largest, most prevalent bank and financial institution in Canada? That’s rare these days..

  • Trevor

    With the App why would you not be able to do this already with a phone that has NFC capabilities? Why is this Sim card required?

    • Harold Mitchell

      Yes…..and why pay $15.00 for the SIM!

    • TheGardener

      Normal SIM I think is $10? With NFC which stores your credit card/ bank information will cost slightly more

    • TheGardener

      It’s for security purposes since your SIM will be imprinted with your card information, not your phone

  • BMSMA

    Yay more less secure methods of spending money. :P

    • David Aitken

      less secure than cash?

    • BMSMA

      I rather lose $20 or $100 than lose my account if my # and PIN gets picked up.

      A couple years ago during Christmas shopping a couple of people were arrested for tracking people’s debit card info put into their store’s debit machine.

    • Plazmic Flame

      While that is definitely a concern, they have technology to track this stuff. I remember I bought fuel at the gas station just down the street from my house, it’s like a 3 min drive and by the time I got home, I got a call from my bank telling me that they’ve detected “irregular activity on my card with the last transaction” that I did.

      Went to the bank and got a new card & number right away.

    • matthewcouto

      I don’t know where you bank but most banks offer their customers zero liability against transactions they didn’t authorize. Including transactions that take place with a stolen pin.

  • hunkyleepickle

    Went NFC payments have to be so complicated confounds me. My phone has NFC, link it to a credit card, and of I go. problem is, every one wants a piece of the pie, carriers, banks, stores…..

  • Allwayswrite

    Lame..please give me a better reason to want this

  • rgl168

    “Gemalto, (Euronext NL0000400653 GTO), the world leader in digital security, today announced that Canadian telecommunications carrier TELUS will use Gemalto’s UpTeq NFC SIM cards to enable consumers to securely store a variety of credentials on their SIM for use with their mobile phones.”

    That was back in March. Glad they actually acted upon it.

    Also why only GS3? Rogers is like this, so is another cell provider in UK.

  • ITCanWork

    OK I got NFC, a galaxy S3, Telus, CIBC/PResident Choice/RBC. What can I do to use my phone to pay instead of pulling out my wallet?

    • ITCanWork

      I don’t get it, all the retailers here in Montreal have NFC, everyone is waving their credit cards and debits at the terminal, isn’t it the same thing

    • Plazmic Flame

      No, that’s not the issue, NFC is actually in more places than you think. If you’ve ever seen “PayPass” on some point of sale machines, that’s NFC tech. I use that a lot as I can just pull out my MasterCard, put it on top or tap the POS machine and the transactions done.

      The hold up is the carriers and creating a good solution. Having a NFC sim, opening and app, entering your password and then tapping is way too long and defeats the purpose of NFC. I have a wallet that allows me to slide my cards out so I don’t even slide my MasterCard completely out of my wallet. I just slide it out halfway, tap the machine, wallet is back in my pocket. It needs to be that fast.

    • gommer strike

      Yes indeed, especially when many of us have PIN codes or other security measures on our smartphones which are mandated by Exchange Activesync and so on.

      So it’d be slower for me to unlock my phone, beep the NFC, and confirm “yes” and so on. Faster for me to just pull out my mini-wallet and slide out my credit card.

    • John Peters

      You don’t get it. It’s a matter of convenience. Say for example, you’re out for a walk and don’t have your wallet with you…. well now you can pay for a coffee at Tim Hortons with your cell phone. I use mine all the time, I always have my cell phone with me and now I don’t need to carry my wallet.

    • gommer strike

      If I leave my house I will have my wallet with me. It has my ID and all that important stuff. You example is situational and applies to *you*.

  • ns.dev

    It’s a shame 0 phone OEMs are including NFC in their phones. /s

    • Plazmic Flame

      Google?
      Samsung?
      LG?

      Oh wait… you mean OEMs that the masses actually care about. Which means you’re referring to Apple. Gotcha.

    • Sweet

      The “/s” means “End Of Sarcasm”.

    • Plazmic Flame

      Yeah… you missed the part where he edited the comment. Thanks though, I do know how to internets.

    • Sweet

      In my browser, I see no indication that the message was edited. Sorry.

    • Plazmic Flame

      No worries, it’s all good.

  • Curtis8

    I find this odd as well. Why add NFC to existing NFC capable devices? Maybe if they covered iPhone would make more sense. I personally have a Lumia 1020, so I too have NFC support, but nothing from TELUS in terms of payment options. PayPass, Wave, the technology already exists in our cards with Visa and MasterCard. Where are they in all this? Granted many places I have been to with PayPass, the terminal does not work and I have to use the chip anyway. Maybe they should fix existing systems before adding new ones.

    • TheGardener

      The NFC on the SIM will store your credit card/ banking information, NFC on your phone allows the capability. It’s more of a security thing

    • Curtis8

      I was under the impression that MS Wallet, Google Wallet, and Apple Passbook, were to be your card storage options. I would rather that myself, but I could be the only one.

  • Johnny

    Am I still the only one hoping for google wallet in Canada??

    • Plazmic Flame

      No, many people are hoping but pretty much unlikely. If anything, this is Google’s ultimate moonshot idea.

    • Johnny

      Yeah..it might help though if the carriers and the bank didn’t all want a piece of it. But that’s probably not going to happen. Oh well I’ll keep dreaming/waiting.

    • John Peters

      Yet you’re OK with Google wanting a piece of it?

  • 737av8r

    Doesn’t make sense. It almost seems as though they’re setting this up to fail.

  • nooner713

    My take on this is that it uses the NFC in the SIM and doesn’t uses the phones internal chip. Because of that it can only work where the Sim is not burried inside the body of the phone. I could be full of it though.

  • rgl168

    Okay… today is Oct 10. Any updates?

  • rgl168

    The NFC SIM is now official. On Telus webpage, go to Phones -> Accessories -> TELUS SIM cards. Cost $15.

  • Hellfire

    From Telus: The mobile payment system will be available in mid november, and will be supported by BMO, CIBC, Scotiabank and RBC at launch. However, any bank with an online banking system in theory could be supported.

  • V Couverite

    So far I read “The NFC on the SIM will store your credit card/ banking information, NFC on your phone allows the capability. It’s more of a security thing.”

    Why is storing info on SIM more secured than on a chip/the phone? I can’t seem to find anything in this topic… Is this unique to us/Canadians?

    • rgl168

      If you recall from Windows Phone 8 conference last year, the Microsoft guy mentioned that GSMA’s direction is to have the secure element on the SIM card. This is because when people upgrade phones, swap the SIM card and all of the banking info will get migrated to the new phone.
      Of course the flip side of the coin is when people travel, or constantly moving from provider to provider, the “secure element on the phone” model would make sense.

    • S. Sepehr

      That is actually my question. In the US they are doing that already, which is using Secure Element that is already on all NFC-enabled devices. I’m really confused. If you already have that on the phones, why the heck do you need to buy a Sim Card for it? And I can’t figure out if there is any other country in the world that takes this Sim-based approach.