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Canadian Edtech leaders help kids learn about climate change with coding

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Canadian education tech leaders, Kid Code Jeunesse (KCJ) and Inksmith are joining together to give kids a hands-on educational experience focused on climate change.

Inksmith will be launching a series of Climate Action Kits so that children can learn about climate change issues through a variety of challenges. Some of these include “designing experiments and prototyping solutions using an educational micro-computer called the micro: bit, a device that KCJ uses in their workshops,” according to the media release. Further, the kids can reuse these components for different projects or hand the entire kit to another class.

The collaboration between the two Edtech leaders is the beginning of a decade of action with ‘Global Goals’ that aims to give children the critical thinking and creativity they need to tackle climate change.

The first kit, called the Land Kit, tackles Goals 11 to 15 and these are about ‘Life on Land.’ Inksmith will then release more kits on oceans and green energy later this year.

These kits arrive with minimal packaging and feature a curriculum, which will allow educators to integrate ‘Global Goals’ into their lesson plan. The projects will teach children how to use the technology, how it interacts with the world around them and how to go hands-on with building.

“The KCJ team has made an incredible impact on making coding education accessible to kids across Canada with their micro:bit workshop programs. This partnership represents our joint commitment to meaningful coding and technology education to prepare students for the future,” said Jeremy Hedges, founder and CEO of Inksmith, in a press release. “For kids, learning coding in the context of Climate Action opportunities and the Global Goals gives the ‘why’ they need to be inspired to pursue careers in these fields.”

Lastly, for every Climate Action Kit sold, Inksmith will plant five trees and donate 15 percent of its proceeds to KCJ so that it can further support its AI, coding and digital citizenship workshops.

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