CRTC makes new wholesale internet available to resellers

Comments

  • Liquid5n0w

    “In light of the above, the Commission considers that Bell Canada’s and the cable carriers’ proposed costs, for the purpose of setting interim rates, are not reasonable. The Commission further considers that interim rates should rely on established Phase II costing methodology and past Commission determinations.”
    Ouch.

    • John Lofwire

      So basically rate must be based on outdated information.

  • It’s Me

    They need to start applying this same reasoning to wireless.

    • Bill___A

      No they don’t. It doesn’t help things get better. Our wireless rates are not higher than the USA. They are not about to get like Europe.

    • It’s Me

      People spread the same FUD about wireline ISP. And they were just as wrong.

      And yes, our rates are higher than the US, though their very highest rates are similar to ours (hence reports from shills like Wall usually show them as the same once they’ve cherrypicked the right numbers). The difference is that, especially because of a vibrant MVNO market, in the US you can avoid the highest rates easily and still get the same service.

    • David Markx

      I could get an unlimited data plan in the US for less than whatever the hell you’re currently paying. Canada is literally the very close to being the least developed country in the world when it comes to telecommunications infrastructure. Sky high prices though.

    • Brandon Arneson

      Our wireless plans are such a ripoff with the big carrier’s all because they don’t want to offer unlimited data at fair prices even though it isn’t hard to do as long as there’s a fair use policy in place that limits speeds to something usable past a certain usage amount,not 2G or pre dialup data speeds like freedom mobile has because the data is useless

  • Ben Gigan

    Sounds like a great way to get better service through a discount provider. You don’t have to worry about expiring rebates like you normally do with Bell

  • unknwon

    does this mean it will apply to EASTLINK network too? i`ve been waiting forever for places like vmedia, cantel,etc to finally offer cable internet service here. we pay a stupid amount for 20megs like 65/month

    • There are Eastlink resellers such as netfox and citywide. 20Meg is $47.95 with citywide in the maritimes.

    • unknwon

      Wish they serviced ontario, but there is only one other provider and their prices are the same as eastlink

  • Bill___A

    Why would a company invest billions of dollars in a fiber to the home project if they are forced to wholesale it out to other companies that don’t have to invest more than a very minimal amount? We have very little fiber to the home availability in Canada and this is not helping at all. If it is the goal of the CRTC to have everyone and their dog use any fiber infrastructure, there should be a central wholesale utility that builds and maintains the infrastructure and leases capacity out to all comers. It is going to be a very long time before even our city dwellers get fiber to the home the way this is going.

    • John Lofwire

      Sad but true.

    • naviz

      Because they have had a monopoly due to being a crown corporation for close to a century and continue to have a monopoly?
      For example, BC Tel (now Telus), owns virtually all telecommunication lines in BC. So the majority of people have no option other than Telus. Even nowadays, for example, a new building a family member moved in has fibre only, and the “cheapest” plan is a $70 a month 10 Mbps package and nothing else.

      The least they can give back to taxpayers after a decade of subsidies and free money/resources is a tiny portion of the enormous profit they will make after these upgrades.

    • Bill___A

      The shareholders of today don’t give a rip about what happened in the past, and the governments got paid for their shares. I don’t think BC Tel was owned by any government -it was a public company that was half owned by GTE Corp for example. A regular rate for an entry level plan on Shaw in BC is about $70 per month too, so I don’t think Telus are out of line. I don’t agree to new buildings having no options, they should have at least two fiber connections going to each office or suite and have it converge in a utility room where other providers can connect – but that isn’t the same as reselling. In an ideal world, we might want to have a utility that owns fiber to everywhere and each and every provider pays to go on it, but that’s not how we went. I am not opposed to competition, I just think it should be fair competition.

    • naviz

      BC Tel was a crown corporation for a long time. $70 is not anywhere near normal, which is around $40 for a decent package.

      Anyways, the fact that they were guaranteed a monopoly by being an ILEC requires them to share infrastructure by law. This should continue unless they divest all previous infrastructure to a shared services crown corporation that leases it out. If they did that, I’d have no problem of them not sharing. Building upon decades of my tax dollars for private profit is not in any way acceptable.

    • Disparishun

      Why they invest in a fiber to the home project? Um, because they make money off it. Margins on wholesale are actually higher than on retail, until the retail customer buys more than one service. (And guess what — in the OTT world, the ISP winning the customer’s voice or video subscription is going to happen less and less. Customers go with the best option, and on the Internet, voice and video providers are competing with the whole world.)

    • Bill___A

      I’m sorry I don’t have access to the numbers. Admittedly, wholesale would be a lot less trouble to the owner of the infrastructure.

  • Victoria G.

    I’m just waiting for TELUS to bring their internet and television services to Ontario. I have 4 wireless lines with TELUS imagine how much money I’d save if I got their internet and cable services too in some kind of package or bundle. Discounts! That’s what I’m about.

    • Will not happen. Telus is an incumbent, if you’re already served by Bell you will not get Telus. TekSavvy, Start, etc will be your competitive options.

  • Disparishun

    “A company purchases wholesale internet access primarily when it does not
    have the infrastructure to provide service directly to its customers.”

    Nope. Not wholesale Internet access.

  • mark roechner

    Wow this was a lame decision from the start. The complexity for Cable Co’s and Telco’s has increased with the latest technology. Wholesale services offer competitive rates to access Networks for companies with no skin in the game. Of course they want access to every service they can get but they are suppose to add value on top of the service, They should try bringing innovation and enhanced products and services over the TOP not just be a re-seller of a wholesale product offering with margin mark-up. Prices points are high in Canada and no CRTC decision has really made any impact in the past 10 years to Reduce cost to Consumers. We still have some of the highest Internet and Cell Phone rates in the World. What has been lacking overall is Innovation. The big companies have extensive networks, investments and services but no newer niche players entering market or new startups building out infrastructure and investing in technology to compete and offer better cheaper products choices to Canadians. The small ISP market lacks investment and Innovation and just serves up Whine to the CRTC. Bell/Telus/Rogers/Shaw/Videotron all invest significant amounts into network infrastructure in order to compete and grow their business,

    • While I agree neither government nor the CRTC has done much to bring cellular rates down (hopefully the CRTC will begin reviewing wifi first MVNOs like they were instructed to), to say wholesale ISPs have not benefited Canadian’s or their pocketbooks is absurd. The Companies you just listed countlessly receive government breaks, grants and ultimately hold a monopoly on the infrastructure they deploy (fibre and cable). Wholesale access requirements ensures these monopolies are not abused, by fostering competition in wireline telecommunications while still allowing the providers to make a decent profit in the wholesale rates.

    • mark roechner

      Actually the public traded companies no longer benefit from govt breaks and monopoly structures. Consumers have choices today more so than in the past as speeds have increased across many different platforms. My problem is having the CRTC dictate outdated policy, or when Harper Govt decided to battle with Cellular providers and we all know how that turned out. ARPU is higher than ever. We need govt to stop protecting us from big bad business (canadian) and open up the markets and let whomever wants to Invest and build out networks compete in the Canadian marketplace and we need to stop all the protectionism, We would have more innovation and better price points,