Apple convinces Consumer Reports to retest 2016 MacBook Pro battery life

Comments

  • fruvous

    I won’t be suprised if they got the same poor results.

    • Do Do

      I will but it won’t mean that they’re done with battery issues.

  • Petit Baveux

    Yup, if you tell them how to test you should get your expected results…

    • TrickyDickie

      Well, to be fair, Apple’s Tame Press sites all tend to vary their testing method to ensure Apple’s toy gadgets always win in their ‘testing’ lol

    • It’s Me

      That’s a nice fantasy, except that exactly the opposite of what happened in reality. CR handicapped the tests, unintentionally, using a config that would almost never be used by end users.

    • hoo dat

      They didn’t handicap anything. This is a configuration that they use in ALL computer tests and not just specifically for Macs. This allows everything to be tested on an even playing field.

    • It’s Me

      And Apple admitted that this configuration exposes a bug they have…but only when using a specific configuration that no one uses.

    • TrickyDickie

      Turn it in lol
      The iPress sites are forever moving the goalposts and ignoring things that reduced the score for anything non-Apple.

    • It’s Me

      You mean like consumer reports did when they said the battery life wasnt up to par? Or when the failed it because of the touch-gate? Or when the media created bend gate?

      No one said CR was in the wrong. Their test exposes a bug that’ve apple admits to, but on that only occurs when using a configuration no one uses.

      Talk about delusional. Even when they fail them you think they are praising them. I hope you are only pretending to be this dense. You are going to be challenged in life if you are actually this dumb. Being tricky won’t save you from being dumb.

    • TrickyDickie

      You really don’t like it when people speak I’ll of Apple, do you?

    • It’s Me

      As with anything else, if they do it in an intelligent and honest way, sure. For example, some bashing them for touch disease, I’d have no problem with it because it’s a real issue.

      Now, someone looking at a case where “the media” failed Apple something and then somehow using that to claim Apple is getting favourable treatment is neither intelligent nor honest.

      I have an issue with stupidity and dishonesty.

    • TrickyDickie

      I never said they were getting favoured treatment from CR. It is the rest of their Tamed Press that does that. Some of them openly admit to it, and with the rest it is us “apple haters” that call them out on it.

    • It’s Me

      So when Apple every issue, whether it is unique to Apple or whether it’s much of a real issue, becomes front page news and gets a new “-gate” crisis, that’s the tamed press?

      You’re right, much of it is Apple haters whining about products they don’t use (which is a fascinating phenomenon from a religious and psychological perspective in and of itself) and the echo chamber/circIejerk they form.

      Apple does get more than their fair share of press, good and bad.

    • TrickyDickie

      Bollocks! Any bad Apple news gets mentioned maybe once per site, and they’ll downplay the hell out of it. Any other tech maker and there will be multiple articles telling us how bad it is.

      And you talk of religion… Like the iCultists defending Apple at all costs?

    • It’s Me

      Really? Like all the coverage about Samsung Edge phones bending worse that the 6 Plus? That was headline news across the internet for weeks for Apple. It was a crisis. Apple was the devil. It was barely even a backpage story for Samsung. How about samsungs also suffering from attenuation when held wrong? Never covered. Note 7’s getting stuck in bootloops before the fire fiasco? I expect you never read about those either.

      The fact is, the only story that got more coverage recently than Apple problems, like bendgate, touch disease, battery issues, was exploding Notes.

      The fact you pretend to be ignorant of is that negative apple stories sell. That’s why they get blown up all over the media. You know that. I honestly think you are just pretending to be too dumb to know.

    • TrickyDickie

      That coverage of bendgate was iTards bending any other handset they could get their hands on so they could say”See! It isn’t just the iPhone!”
      In other words, downplaying the negative Apple news.

      And you go on about religion… Like you and the other iCultists defending Apple til the bitter end lol

    • It’s Me

      There you go. Get that picket sign up high brother! Preach it and save us from Apple!

    • TrickyDickie

      Is way too late for some of you lol

    • It’s Me

      That’s good. You westboro types are a little too inbred 😉

      Guess that the tricky part.

    • Mo Dabbas

      Bend gate is real though. I’ve seen many bent iPhones. I would be honest and say that this isn’t exclusive to apple iPhones as I’ve seen some HTC M8 and M9 with a kinked side (where the volume buttons/rocker are) and Nexus 6P around the power button. These are all due to weak phone construction and they can be easily generated with normal use.

    • It’s Me

      Definitely could bend and as you say, not exclusive to Apple. I’ve never seen one bent from “normal”‘use, but I guess it depends on what one subjectively considered normal.

      Some phone were more prone to bending that iPhone, but they were barely a media event that iPhone was. Was the media circus an example of Apple getting a pass?

    • Do Do

      You’re ignoring the fact that all around the internet people are complaining about the battery. Some of whom don’t sound capable of changing, and certainly don’t point out that they’ve changed any developer settings. I don’t think they’ve fixed the battery problem, if all they did is fix this unique bug. However time will tell.

    • It’s Me

      How am I ignoring it? I’m not saying there isn’t a problem with the battery. Maybe there is.

      What I challenged was the vacuous position that the media rigs tests and coverage so Apple always looks good. The original CR tests proves that’s not the case. The massive amount of coverage of every perceived problem, real or imagined, unique to Apple or common to many, proves that’s not the case.

    • Do Do

      “The original CR tests proves that’s not the case.”
      It proves that CR doesn’t rig the tests so Apple looks good perhaps but it doesn’t prove any other site doesn’t. Regardless, as far as I can tell from all I’ve been reading this is just one issue with the battery that was easily solved but as I said it’s doubtful everyone who’s been complaining changed this developer setting they’re speaking of.

    • It’s Me

      I’m sure they all didn’t either. The battery life may not be up to spec. Other viable explanations could be people pushing them hard when they first get them and then obviously battery life won’t last as long. Even initial setup, with all the file set up and file transfers will drain battery higher at first. As you say, time will tell.

    • It’s Me

      And when you tell them they have handicapped the test, they agree to test without the handicap and test results are what was claimed.

    • Petit Baveux

      They shouldn’t include settings that should not be set then…

    • It’s Me

      It’s only exposed as a developer setting, so it isn’t included/exposed for normal users.

    • Petit Baveux

      I thought that the “Pro” version was not for normal users…

    • It’s Me

      “Pro” doesn’t mean developer mode.

  • Rev0lver

    Is “you’re testing it wrong” the new “you’re holding it wrong”?

    • Brad Fortin

      Both are just another way of saying “take responsibility for your own actions”. Some people have a hard time with that.

    • Rev0lver

      Really? Telling someone to hold a phone differently so it works is not a personal responsibility problem, it’s a design problem.

      There are standard tests for a reason, a level playing field will give an unbiased result.

      Imagine if Ford told the EPA that their cars got bad mileage because they’re driving them wrong…

    • Brad Fortin

      “You’re holding it wrong” came from people who were losing signal by holding it in a death grip, and countless videos showed that if you held any other phone in the same grip you would suffer identical signal loss. The problem wasn’t with the antennas, the problem was people gripping their phones with exaggerated force to purposely lose signal. If you stopped holding your phone in a death grip and held it normally you wouldn’t encounter the problem, hence Steve Jobs telling people to “stop holding the phone that way” when they were purposely holding it in a way that would cause signal loss. He was essentially telling people to smarten up.

      Now in this case “you’re testing it wrong” comes from Consumer Reports running tests under conditions that tried to emulate a real-world usage scenario, however due to the setup conditions and the encountered bug they ended up creating a wildly *un*realistic usage scenario and rushed to publish their review based on incomplete and incorrect data rather than investigating the questionable results before publishing. Although I wouldn’t use the phrase “you’re testing it wrong”, more like “stop being lazy and check your work before you publish”.

    • Rev0lver

      Seriously? CR tests laptops all the time. 99% of the manufacturers don’t have a problem with the test, but when apple does it’s the test’s fault?

      Man, enjoy that Apple Kool aid….

    • Brad Fortin

      99% of manufacturers aren’t running macOS and Safari where Consumer Reports would run into this bug. This is also a problem specific to this version of macOS and Safari so it also wouldn’t have shown up on previous tests of Apple’s machines.

      They noticed their results were unusual, they even pointed out that their results were unusual and that they were a bit miffed by it, but rather than investigating the buggy results like any competent organization would they instead rushed to publish now and correct themselves later. Consumer Reports should’ve known better than to rush inconclusive results. No childish “Kool aid” necessary.

    • Rev0lver

      They were right. The MacBook had a flaw, not the test.

      I accept that it’s fixed now and that the problem seems to be resolved.

      Still won’t make me buy this overpriced device.

  • Andrew

    If Apple fixed the bug shouldn’t Consumer Reports just re-test with the same settings? Since they always use this setting in their tests, by turning it off now invalidates all their laptop battery tests.

    • hoo dat

      Couldn’t agree with you more.

  • Omar

    I wonder if Apple threatened, er I mean “convinced them” by saying they won’t send them review devices anymore if they don’t “fix” their review.

    • hoo dat

      CR buys every product they test, whether it be an Apple Mac, Tesla, or an Electrolux freezer. They do not accept product from anyone.

      On one occasion Ford insisted that they retest their Windstar minivan and offered CR a free test vehicle, CR accepted as long as it was a vehicle of their choosing without interference from Ford. CR flew into Oakville without warning, picked a random unsold unit off the line and drove it back to their HQ that day. As far as I know that’s the only time they’ve taken a test unit for free (I was a regional manager with Ford at the time).

  • Do Do

    I very much doubt that everyone complaining about battery problems is changing this setting. Something smells fishy to me.

  • Jonathan

    So if it’s just this setting that’s to blame, why are so many others affected by this? And why did Apple take the extraordinary step of removing a feature that’s been a part of macOS for ages?
    (The estimated time indicator)

    The estimated time remaining is actually pretty useful.

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