Samsung Note 7 issues caused by rush to compete with ‘dull iPhone,’ says report

Comments

  • joe

    “The company has resumed sales in North Korea”

    North Korea? Lol

    • Tim3Tripp3r

      Maybe they’re getting the recalled ones – the Note 7 flambé, good for keeping you warm during those cold N. Korean winters.

    • samsvoc

      Lol

    • BBRYSUXBALLS_2.1

      Send them the rejects.

    • Alex

      north koreans would LOVE to buy a samsung note 7, to bad they dont know it exists.

      also, every other source i check, says sales resume in south korea on sept 28, not now.

    • BBRYSUXBALLS_2.1

      Let hope!

  • Kevin Pianoman Pleasants,

    Note 7 sales will resume September 28, 2016 in the US.

    • League of Ninjas

      I’m pretty sure it resumes September 21st

    • Kevin Pianoman Pleasants,

      No, current customers are receiving the replacements phones on or before the 21st. but I picked up my replacement phones today from AT&T. Sales will begin again on September 28th. Meaning stores can start selling them again.

    • League of Ninjas

      There really isnt an official statement saying that it will resume on the 28th for usa or Canada. And there are people buying new note 7s even today at the store

  • Darren Zak

    Samsung did the right thing with the recall, and still have my trust. The people that don’t recognize this aren’t Samsung customers and never will be. If anything, this will ensure that all future Samsung devices will go through an extra layer of quality control.

    • samsvoc

      U work for Samsung?

    • Darren Zak

      Not at all.

    • AJKahn

      Anyone who writes anything about any company becomes a fanboy/worker. This is the internet. 🙂

      But I do commend Samsung’s quick action. I know they lost a lot of momentum and money and what not, but at least I know that they will stand up to their mistakes (deadly ones at least).

    • samsvoc

      Samsung is only looking after their bottom line. They had no choice but to issue a recall. If Samsung truly cared about their customers, they would give us timely updates. I no longer own a Samsung phone but do like the company.

    • hardy83

      Samsung took around two weeks before issuing a recall after it acknowledged the issue.

      1. You don’t praise a company for doing something it’s suppose to do.
      2. You don’t praise a company for doing something it’s suppose to do too slowly, especially when people could get hurt.

      People will bring up the financial drawbacks of a recall, but honestly, that’s not our problem.
      We as consumer should care only about how fast a company deals with something like this. The money is for them and investors to deal with.

      I mean I suppose since proper handling of stuff like this is usually handled so poorly that doing what you’re suppose to do is almost praise worthy, but it shouldn’t be.

      Also, this won’t ensure future devices will go through extra quality control, and never will, for the long term anyways.

      Whether you like Samsung or not, they handled this pretty poorly, BUT I suppose not as bad as some other companies have handled recalls. I mean it’s not GM level of incompetence (ignition switch recall) where people actually died and they actively tried to hide the issue. They don’t deserve praise though.

    • FlamesFan89

      For the most part, I agree with your comment, however, I want to play a little Devil’s Advocate here.

      In terms of the length of time before issuing a recall, I think it is rather reductionist, or simplistic, to assume that upon discovery of a problem, that it might be a “next day” or just a couple day turn around, to actually issue a recall.

      For one, they would want to make damn sure that they know is it a truly systemic issue. You wouldn’t want to recall every single phone if it was limited to a single production run, or something like that. Those investigations take time. Even if you hired some independent consultant to figure it out, it’s not something that happens in a day.

      Next, they are selling phones in countries all over the world, with all different regulations, and governments, and bureaucracies. I’m sure there are processes and systems that need to be followed to issue a recall. It’s not as simple as issuing a press release.

      Next, and while this one shouldn’t be an excuse for any company, it is a reality of the world we live in, I’m sure there needs to be a vote of some sort by the Board of Directors, or whomever, and there is going to need to be some convincing there. The magnitude of this in terms of scale, cost, and impact, are huge. It’s not something they are going to want to do at the drop of a hat. It would be a very carefully, considered, and informed decision.

      There are likely numerous other factors that play in that you and I can’t even think of, but the bottom line is, it’s not as simple as “people are tweeting that their phones exploded, RECALL” and you are done.

      In the end, I think they probably could have acted a bit faster. But two weeks is a pretty quick turn around I would think when you compare it to other industries, like

    • It’s Me

      In terms of the length of time before issuing a recall, I think it is rather reductionist, or simplistic, to assume that upon discovery of a problem, that it might be a “next day” or just a couple day turn around, to actually issue a recall.

      Should have been the next day. At least to get the ball rolling on an official recall. Not 2 weeks.
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-18/samsung-crisis-began-in-rush-to-capitalize-on-uninspiring-iphone

      In the U.S. for example, companies are supposed to notify the Consumer Product Safety Commission within 24 hours of uncovering problems. Instead, Samsung went public on its own and consumers didn’t have clear guidance on how to exchange their phones. .

    • FlamesFan89

      Like I said, they could have acted faster. But next day for a worldwide recall? Can we please return to reality?

      You will have to forgive me on not being fully up to date with the laws of another country, but I’m guessing that “notify[ing] the Consumer Product Safety Commission within 24 hours of uncovering problems.” is not the same thing as issuing a worldwide recall.

    • It’s Me

      Suppose to notify them within 24 hours, not a week. Issuing your own recall before alerting authorities can actually make things worse, as we’ve seen

      CPSC Chairman Elliot Kaye suggested the CPSC action was delayed because of the company’s decision to pursue its own global voluntary recall. “As a general matter it’s not a recipe for a successful recall for a company to go out on its own,” he said.

      http://www.wsj.com/articles/samsungs-management-of-recall-wounds-companys-image-1473928872

      Samsung knew about problems with the Galaxy Note 7 batteries at least as early as September 1, when it halted sales of the Note 7. The CPSC is only getting involved now because Samsung waited eight days before notifying them

      http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/09/feds-explosive-samsung-galaxy-note-7-earns-official-cpsc-recall-status/

    • FlamesFan89

      I’m not disputing any of that. They didn’t handle it well. There is no denying that.

      I’m just saying that people are acting as though the phones should have been replaced 14 seconds after a problem was discovered.

      I’m just saying that the REAL world works slower than that.

      Yes they didn’t notify the CPSC on time. FAIL.

      But they did make a public statement saying they would replace every single phone on Sept 2nd. It’s not the RIGHT approach, but it isn’t like they hid it away for months on end.

      Look, again, I’m not trying to praise Samsung here. I’m simply pointing out the realities of the world we live in. You can feel free to ignore reality if you so choose.

    • It’s Me

      Agree with pretty much all of that. I am not faulting them at all for trying to get out ahead of the problem. Their speed is to their credit for the most part.

    • FlamesFan89

      Let’s also keep in mind that the 2 weeks, as best I can tell, is from from launch day, to the point were Koh officially announced that they would replace all the Note 7’s shipped.

      That article you linked is hilarious though. They use sources like “someone familiar with the matter”, which is journalist speak for “I overheard some guys chatting about it”, and then move on to “One employee, in an online discussion group”. Ah the good old trustworthy “online discussion group”. Never was there a more reliable source.

    • It’s Me

      The delay inproper and official action is being pretty widely reported. Take it up with Bloomber, WSJ and ArsTechnica if you don’t like their attribution or lack thereof. Hell, even Samsung’s own media site waited until Sept 9 to mention any discussions with CPSC.

    • FlamesFan89

      This is WAY off topic, but on the topic of attribution, I feel like it is a result of the internet, and the digital age we live in, where journalists are pushed harder and harder to have stories written quicker and quicker, to beat the rush of headlines all over the www, but I feel like we are seeing a rapid decline in the quality of journalism in the world.

      We should demand more from the major publications. It’s one thing for a blog to quote an online discussion forum, but for a major publication to do it, that should be seen as an embarrassment.

      Oh well, my ranting won’t change things, but at least I’ve said my piece, and hopefully at least one person reads it.

    • It’s Me

      To be honest, I can’t fault Samsung for moving before the notification. They were rushing to try to get ahead of the problem, which is certainly to their credit. I just wonder if they were also trying to get away with handling it all on their own in order to avoid having to make further details of the cause public.

    • FlamesFan89

      I’m sure they were trying to save face however they could. Absolutely. That said, their CEO of all people made a public announcement that they would replace every phone shipped, and he made that announcement on Sept 2nd, 1 day after they were apparently fully aware of the issue.

    • samsvoc

      Bingo ????

    • TrickyDickie

      It wasn’t that long lol

    • thereasoner

      “Samsung took around 2 weeks to issue a recall after it acknowledged the issue ”

      FALSE

      Samsung issued their own recall the day after their investigation pin pointed the reason on September 1st. All Note users were notified repeatedly by text and email by both Samsung and carriers. Even at that point only 35 complaints existed, much less at the start of the investigation that had to rule out 3rd party chatgers/cables among other things.

      Samsung did a great job in reacting fast in the best interest of the consumer, they deserve the praise that they have received on threads like this one.

    • rick

      It’s taken others longer than that and a class action law suit to kick things in gear. Might not have been a safety concern, but a bunch of customers that put out good money were pretty PO’d regardless.

  • It’s Me

    So now it wasn’t a defective battery that it was physically too big? Assuming both of their battery suppliers followed the same specs guidelines and produced batteries of the same size, then it really is all units that are susceptible. That explains recent reports that the supposedly safe Chinese units are exploding too.

    The explanations have certainly been fluid and changing.

    • FlamesFan89

      The thing is, at this point, you can safely assume it is all just PR talk, and really, is irrelevant. They could tell you that magic battery pixies had infested the factory and got their pixie dust in the batteries. It really doesn’t matter.

      What matters is that they are doing an official recall, and you can be pretty sure that they don’t want to make the same mistake twice, as it has been very costly, so they have likely corrected the problem, whatever it is.

    • Do Do

      Unless something very serious happens as consequence of these “flawed designs”. Then that will change everything I think and then a lot of different people will be looking into how this was handled. By serious, I don’t mean someone burning their pinky. I mean serious.

    • Do Do

      That’s what I was reading a couple of days ago, “design flaw”. However, you watch some videos of how easy it is to catch these batteries on fire, one would have to be naive to think it can’t happen with other phones that have non removable batteries under the right circumstances. I believe you drop any phone and you run the risk of it catching fire with these dopey race to the thinnest phone designs.

    • thereasoner

      Bloomberg is quoting “people in the know” or probably the same people who lied and said that the kid who got burned was holding a Note.

      Personally, I’m going to be holding my nose because I expect tons of stories that reek of bias to pile up on Samsung as much as possible before this issue winds down completely.

  • Tim3Tripp3r

    On a more serious note regarding the above line “was slightly too big for its compartment”. So did they make the battery slightly smaller (less capacity) or the space larger that the battery goes in. That sounds like a wishy wash answer coming out of Samsung that doesn’t completely add up. I sure hope that the issue is truly resolved and behind them for both the consumers and the shareholders. It would be a real bummer to be revisiting this story as “to be continued” months down the road.

    • FlamesFan89

      Considering the cost of the recall, and the damage it has done to their reputation, as well as their stock price, I’m willing to bet that regardless of any wishy washy remarks on what caused the problem, they are going to be making damn sure that the replacements don’t have the same problem.

      If they don’t, they can kiss their marketshare goodbye.

    • Richie_Peterson

      Tim3Tripp3r…. you make a good point. If the battery compartment is too small is this now going to change the specs of the phone? Is it now going to be thicker or is the battery going to be smaller? If its smaller then are we going to receive a refund of a set amount should we decide to keep the phone? OR a refund now that the phone is thicker than previously stated?
      I’m going to keep my eye on this situation of the battery size.

    • samsvoc

      I don’t see Samsung retooling to make a thicker phone. Cheaper to just install a smaller battery and give customers a gift card towards future Samsung products.

    • Richie_Peterson

      I don’t see that either, but if they dont provide the specs they promised at purchase, someone will certainly file a class action lawsuit against them. I mean its the most expensive phone on the market right now and for the price they better produce what they promised. One of the main reasons I bought the Note 7 was because of the larger battery size.

    • Tim3Tripp3r

      I’d like to see one of the tear down sites ifixit (or who ever) take a pre-recall Note 7 and fixed one and do a side by side tear down. If there’s no difference then I’d say it warrants further ‘splaining by Sammy. I could see how they could do a quick turnaround of new batteries that were miniscule smaller without really affecting battery life but I really have a hard time getting my head around them making the space bigger aspect considering the timeline we’ve seen. Just curious more than anything, not trying to say Samsung is not doing their utmost to make it right for the consumer (no pun intended).

    • FlamesFan89

      I don’t see why both issues that they have said couldn’t be true. So they first said that there was an

      “error in production put pressure on the plates within the battery cells, bringing negative and positive poles into contact”,

      then they elaborated to say

      “that the phone’s battery was slightly too big for its compartment, and that the tight space pinched the battery, causing a short circuit”.

      Both of these things can be true. Sounds to me like the production error caused the battery to be too big, and when it had pressure applied from being in the phone, it caused the poles to make contact. Correcting the production error would result in the batteries being the proper size, which would eliminate the excess pressure, meaning the poles wouldn’t come into contact.

      No need to redesign the battery compartment, nor change the battery capacity. Simply make the battery properly, to the listed specifications and tolerances, and all is well.

  • Coria

    I must say some of the reviewers here are absolutely unreliable (trying to be as polite as possible) when the others are great. That live video about iPhone 7 and note 7 was so painful to listen to because of the such a biased opinion. Mobilesyrup used to be trust worthy no questions ask but now it’s like plying a Russian roulette.

  • jay

    Samsung is still a good brand and recall happened all the time just see the car industry. Recall after recall ???????????? but now to the facts that the note 7 is a high innovative device and oh well there is a recall apple also had recall or things they did not called.. Like front facing camera moved. I like my phone and see no problem own a note in the future and for all these apple trolls out there don’t believe those reviews out there ????

  • Samuel Gomez Recuero

    I will like to see the directors production and QA from SDI on the next directors meeting at Samsung. I will like to see how far they bend over. It is said the the more you bend the bigger the offense and your remorce too. Or do you guys think they will get fired?

  • thereasoner

    Are new Notes coming with smaller batteries? Where did Samsung say the battery was to big?

    As far as I’m aware, these reports from anonymous people are best taken with a grain of salt. Sounds like people are just trying to.pile on while they still can as the issue quick winds down. Remindso me of other false reports including the kid who wasn’t burned by a Note after all.

    • It’s Me

      Chairman of the CPSC said it.

      The chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission was more explicit when his agency announced an official recall on Thursday. He said the phone’s battery was slightly too big for its compartment and the tight space pinched the battery, causing a short circuit.

      Maybe if they’d removed the headphone jack they’d have had enough room to no squish the battery. /s

    • thereasoner

      So Samsung is not saying that, the new Notes continue to use the same size battery and any size constraints can be linked to the original explanation of faulty battery pack manufacturing by the sounds of it.

      Link?, I’d like to see if there was clarification as to the cause of why the size being the issue and whether it was either by design or a result of the previously identified manufacturing flaws. Should be interesting to see what size battery the new Notes have as well as I’ve seen no reports of Samsung moving to even a slightly smaller one.

    • It’s Me

      No clarification.
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-18/samsung-crisis-began-in-rush-to-capitalize-on-uninspiring-iphone

      There is the statement from the US gov and the statement from Samsung (from a week ago) about the defective battery cells. The statement from the government is newer though it conflicts with what Samsung earlier said.

    • thereasoner

      Yep, no clarification or confirmation of anything really. Just opinion and speculation from a Bloomberg analyst.

      I think that the attempt to insist on a rush for this device only conveyed the obvious anti-Samsung slant of this article. They used the 10 day difference in the reveal/announcement to push this piece of propaganda when it had no bearing on the actual release date of the device which could have demonstrated a rush but shows only a, not surprisingly unmentioned, 2 day difference. It pretty much set the premise of both this Bloomberg piece and the throwing of whatever speculation at the wall to see what sticks sort of attacks anti-Samsung types are using lately.

      As I said in another post, this kind of piling on with misinformation, speculation or even lies is to be expected as this issue winds down with devices being switched out now. It has actually been like this to some degree from the start with multiple false or unconfirmed reports being reported as fact, people are just getting in as much digs at Samsung as they can before Samsung completes the exchanges. Strike while the irons hot so they say.

    • It’s Me

      No speculation. It was directly attributed to CPSC chairman Eliot Kaye.

      Samsung told regulators the phone’s battery was slightly too big for its compartment and the tight space pinched the battery, causing it to short circuit, Kaye said.

    • thereasoner

      Which brings us back to a design or manufacturing defect which is yet unconfirmed. Round and round we go….and yes, that Samsung was rushing to release early is speculation if not a bold faced lie considering the 2 day difference in releasing the device this year from the previous year.

    • Do Do

      “Maybe if they’d removed the headphone jack they’d have had enough room to no squish the battery. /s”

      Funny, but the truth is Apple never needed to remove the headphone jack. They did it strictly to create another product category IMO. Phone sales are dropping for all of companies and they need to replace that revenue. Samsung is doing it by now making batteries not (easily) user replaceable. Apple by removing the headphone jack and selling easy to lose wireless buds and I would guess other wireless items to come.

    • It’s Me

      I’d say that’s a fairly cynical view. Was that your view when Moto dropped the headphone jack? Will that be your view when others start to do the same?

      I’m certainly not arguing that Apple didn’t have their own self-serving motivations for removing the jack. But to sell more wireless headphones? Seems like a big gamble. iPhone is by far their biggest product. Doesn’t seem like a bet the most successful company in the world would make, to gamble potentially losing millions of unit sales of iPhones from people for whom it might be a dealbreaker in order to possibly sell a few, much lower revenue/profit wireless headphones.

    • Do Do

      Moto? I wasn’t aware but it would be fair to call it a cynical view especially since I usually take cynical view of corporate motives, I certainly don’t think it was particularly “courageous”.

      Even if I wasn’t cynical about their reasons for removing the jack, how would you/they explain their reasons for now making noise about removing it from the Macbook’s. They need the space? Really?

      It will absolutely be my view when/if others do it. I’m actually a wireless guy but I totally believe their motives are about revenue. As I said, I’m a wireless guy so I recognize the current limitations, and apples proprietary bluetooth is unlikely solve them but we’ll see.

    • thereasoner

      True for Apple but Samsung makes nothing from embedded batteries. If anything their removable battery sales suffer as a result.

    • Do Do

      Oh come on, you think they’ll replace the batteries for just the cost of a battery? One guy claimed he was quoted $250, you believe you’ll have ip68 if some tech at a store replaces the battery? If not then what was the point of sealing it? How many people will do it themselves? Furthermore, how many people will simply convince themselves they need a new phone when the battery dies within 18-36 months. No, Samsung is doing the exact same thing. Otherwise they would have listened to what customers wanted. Neither company has demonstrated they could care at all what consumers want, it’s all about manipulating us in order to generate more money.

    • thereasoner

      I suppose if a battery replacement is a Samsung battery then Samsung can make their money off that instead of the removable battery but truth is that a Samsung battery need not be chosen in either case.

      That and Samsung doesn’t make a dime on the labor, that goes to the repair shop chosen. That $250 sounds ridiculous, I would suggest shopping around and I’m not sure if those shops guarantee IP 68 or not, I’d imagine that would be hard to pull off without adding the cost of a new back as well.

      A user will know well before the battery”dies” that it isn’t holding a decent charge anymore so it’s not like they will wake up one day to a phone that won’t turn on. It’s up to them what they want to do with it.

      This is NOT the same as Apple. Apple pushed out updates that bricks iPhones that aren’t repaired by them and in doing so they scare iPhone users into paying for more expensive Apple Store repairs even when it’s out of warranty. Samsung doesn’t have a tiny fraction of the stores Apple has and they in no way push people to send their out of warranty devices to them.

      Another difference is that people take their Samsung devices to local 3rd party repair shops that use industry standard parts not necessarily from Samsung and Samsung doesn’t make anything from that whereas iPhone users that don’t use Apple Store repairs have to go to “certified” repair shops where Apple does make money from both the certification and their proprietary parts.

      Samsung apparently did listen to what most consumers want in the change to premium builds if their sales and profit gains die to the S7/S7E are any indication.

  • Shamoy Rahman

    Free business for Apple. Oh also, Displaymate reports the iPhone 7’s display using JDI panels (SONY’s LCD technology) has the best color accuracy on a smartphone display they’ve ever measuerd. Really bad news for Samsung.

    • thereasoner

      That display is still rated below Samsungs Amoleds by the same people.

    • Shamoy Rahman

      I know it is, but it has significantly narrowed a big gap. This will really prompt more people to switch over to the iPhone 7. I’m just buying the Xperia XZ because I know it will have a display similarly as good.

    • thereasoner

      Not so sure about that(people switching) with the iPhone set to switch to Amoleds anyways next year with Apples multi billion dollar deal with Samsung .

    • Shamoy Rahman

      JDI (Japan Display Inc.) will be supplying more AMOLED panels than Samsung and they have an even larger deal with Apple, Apple’s plan is to start off with Samsung’s panels to fill up a supply gap and eventually eliminate them from their supply chain only to use JDI, LG, and Sharp’s AMOLED panels. JDI has the most advanced LTPS AMOLED technology on this planet, better than Samsung but they will be late to mass produce it (2018). iPhones will not use AMOLED displays until 2018 because the supply won’t be ready until then.

    • thereasoner

      “Report: Apple reaches $2.6 billion dollar agreement for Samsung to supply OLED panels starting in 2017”
      -9to5Mac
      “Report: Samsung to supply Apple with 100 million OLED panels”
      -Android Authority

      ….and JDI ? ;
      “Apple fronting JDI $1.7 billion for a new iPhone panel plant”
      -phonearena

      Lmao! Apple has to actually finance the construction of the JDI plant while they simultaneously pay almost double that to Samsung for their panels!!! “Bigger deal” is it? By the time JDI gets going, with Apples money no less, Samsung will be producing better panels already!

      You were saying? …..

  • Lil’ Cwyin’ PC Cowar

    What a bunch of losers. No kimchi for you then.

    • BBRYSUXBALLS_2.1

      How bout some Wok?

    • Lil’ Cwyin’ PC Cowar

      You take ticket! Have seat; no wait longtime, boss!

    • BBRYSUXBALLS_2.1

      Send some Just say Troll. He deserves a large share.

  • rick

    high risk/high reward – no guts no glory. I don’t think it will be as bad as some are making it out in the long run.

  • Captain Henry Morgan

    That dull iPhone 7 is sold out worldwide while Samsung has so waste so much money for rushing out its Note 7.

  • thereasoner

    From your own link:
    “apparently Samsung has signed a deal to supply 100 million panels to Apple each year”

    I’m done with your childish nonsense, find someone else to push your BS on. I’ve got better things to do than give time to liars like you!

    • Shamoy Rahman

      Done with childish nonsense? I just proved your entire point wrong. If apple sells 400 million phones in 4 years and Samsung only supplies 100 million of that, then clearly they’re not getting a majority of the AMOLED supply share. That’s my point.