Canadian mobile customers now pay less for more, and more for less: Wall Report

Daniel Bader

July 14, 2014 2:32pm

Canadians now pay less for higher-end plans, and more for entry-level plans, according to the updated CRTC-commissioned Wall Report.

An annual review of wireless, wireline, mobile data and broadband data prices across various usage models, the Wall Report details the realities of Canadian monthly spending. In its seventh year, this is the first report since the CRTC’s Wireless Code of Conduct came into effect, and shows that while prices for low-usage plans have increased, those in the higher-usage bracket have fallen since last year.

wallreport-2

The report looks at the varying prices of four wireless plan tiers, from low to high usage, three of which have been previously tracked, and compares them between domestic and international carriers.

The tiers are below:

  • Level 1: 150 incoming & outgoing minutes per month, with 10% of outgoing minutes treated as long distance, and no optional features.
  • Level 2: 450 incoming & outgoing minutes per month, with 10% of outgoing minutes treated as long distance, two optional features (voice mail and call display), and 300 text messages per month.Footnote18
  • Level 3: 1,200 incoming & outgoing minutes per month, with 15% of outgoing minutes treated as long distance, full set of optional features, 300 text messages and 1 GB data usage per month.
  • Level 4: Unlimited nationwide talk and text (no international calling included), voice mail and call display, and 2 GB data usage per month.

It found that Level 1 prices have increased 16% between 2013 and 2014, from $30.71 to $35.70, creating a situation where those looking for the most basic of plans will inevitably pay more for the same service. From 2010 to 2015, the increase is a still-frustrating 5%.

Level 3 plans, on the other hand, declined 15% from last year, $93.59 to $79.69, and are far lower than their 2010 high of $109.59.

The Level 4 plan, which comprises the now-ubiquitous unlimited talk and text bracket, which includes voicemail and call display, uses 2GB of data as its base point, citing Canadians’ average monthly data use well below that point. For such a plan, Canadians pay $92.99.

When broken down, though, it’s clear that the incumbents still charge far more than their new entrant counterparts: for the same Level 4 plan, incumbents like Rogers, Bell and Telus charged 49% more than Wind, Mobilicity or Videotron.

The news can be summarized thusly: new entrants and incumbents are beginning to narrow the price gap on talk and text-only plans, but add data and the difference is enormous. This stat is increasingly important for the incumbents, since voice ARPU continues to drop as data ARPU rises to meet it.

wallreport-1

Compared to other countries, Canadians still pay more than most in Europe for the same wireless plans, but pay significantly less than the U.S. and Japan for those in the higher tiers.

With the launch of 2-year share plans in light of the Wireless Code, both the price of handsets and wireless plans have seemingly risen, but the reality is that these plans, like the newly-regulated all-in airline prices, are merely more top-heavy in places.

For example, the decline in Level 3 pricing from 2013 to this year is likely attributable to the fact that the Wall Report treats 15% of the 1,200 included minutes as long distance, which, with the proliferation of unlimited long distance plans, has dropped in price over the last year.

Screenshot 2014-07-14 13.21.11

As for roaming, the Wall Report confirms what we knew all along: the new entrants offer far cheaper US roaming than the incumbents. In fact, for data usage, companies like Wind offer rates five times cheaper than Rogers, Bell or Telus. The difference is even more stark when you take into account Wind offers a plan with unlimited US roaming on T-Mobile.

We’ll delve more into the report as the week progresses, but it’s summarized thusly: “On balance, with the exception of low volume, voice-only plans mobile prices continued a general downward trend with typical voice and text service plan rates down 15% compared to five years ago and higher-volume voice, text and data service plan rates down 27%.”

With the announcement of the AWS-3 auction for next year, new entrants like Wind have the potential to move beyond the spectre of competition to actually challenge the incumbents in both network speed and availability, while continuing to win on cost. Until then, the incumbents retain that distinct national LTE coverage advantage, while charging between 20% and 50% more than the new entrants for the same absolute numbers.

  • Tyrone Thomas

    $90 a month for 2GB of data is still highway robbery!

    • It’s Me

      And it’s very convenient that they left out the fact that in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and part of 2013 you could get the 6GB add on but cannot anymore. So their definition of a high allotment is massively stacked to make it look like you are paying less. The other is that people have been using far less voice. So making it sound like we get more or pay less for more, when talking about talk time minutes we will not use, it is also a little misleading.

      This is a Wall report. Staff and managed by “ex” RBT executives, so take with a gigantic grain of salt.

      One of the fun ways they skew numbers is to cherry pick which ones will serve to put RBT in the best light. So, when the are coming up with national average pricing, they will often include our smaller carriers but will only include large carriers internationally. Failing to mention that in past years the high data usage allotment available was 6GB but now is 2GB is another example. If they added in the overage charges on the missing 4GB it would be more honest.

    • Tyrone Thomas

      Well said!

    • AGoodM8

      I totally concur! The wireless industry is only getting worse for consumers, regardless of price tier.

      Sure, the stats don’t lie .. but the way the measurements are categorized, as well as the manner in which they are interpretated, can be both subjective and biased.

    • moodyjones

      I remember paying $15 for unlimited internet with telus 3 years ago.
      Today I am paying $50 for 6GB with Rogers.

    • MassDeduction

      I remember paying $20 for 200 minutes (and no data nor any SMSs). Things change. They seem to get better, then worse, then better again, in a years-long cycle. To think that once upon a time $100 got you 1000 minutes, and that was a great deal compared to what the competition offered.

    • pc1234

      Yes but now we are going backwards the data is costing us way more now than 3 years ago, 3 to 4 times more.

    • icyhotonmynuts

      I guess you didn’t have a cellphone when data was $30 for 15mb (2006, that was the price of data on a Blackberry BIS data plan, and $60 for BES data, still for 15mb).

      In 2008, as the “study” starts off, data was around $25 for 500mb, or for $30 you got 1gb. However, IIRC that summer was when Rogers got the iPhone 3G, and was offering 6gb for $30.

    • Thorsten Garbe

      I got same plan with mts since 2012.
      Only negative they throttle after 15gb down to 4g.

    • Kenjuta

      this always piss me off
      i use about 4-5GB of data each month and maybe about 30 min talk time and about 200 text. no one has a plan that suites my needs for a decent price except for wind/mobilicity
      in order to get a lot of data you have to pay so much extra for unlimited talk which is completely useless to me

    • It’s Me

      Yup. I used just shy of my full 6GB last month. With the rates quotes by Wall, I would have to add on $40, so closer to $132 for the month for the same features I paid less than $55 for in 2010. Again, thanks to Wall for letting me know that almost 2.5X what I did 4 years ago is actually less.

      Could have been worse. They could have used 500MB as a “high usage” category. They still claim most users don’t use that much, so it would be the same argument they used here.

    • Kenjuta

      what worries me is that the big 3 is going to use this and tell everyone “see! prices are going down. no need to subsidize new entrants”
      what they don’t look as is price of data the keeps going up. they always keep saying most people use less than 2GB. i’m pretty sure most people use less than 2GB is because their plans only give them 1GB. They’d use more easily if they had more to use for cheaper. especially with everything moving to the cloud and everyone’s streaming music and video to their phone, data demands are just going to keep increasing and that’s how they’re making money.
      the reason why they bundle data and voice together is because they’re realizing a trend of people using less and less talk minutes and more and more data

    • MassDeduction

      I’m curious how you guys use that much data? And where do you live?

      Here, in Victoria BC, it’s hard to use any data even if you try. I have the 6GB/$30 option, and I usually use about 512MB under pretty extensive usage. That’s with me using it however I want, without any attempt to moderate my usage since I’ve never come even remotely close to going over.

      I have WiFi at home and at work, and in most public places since I’m a Shaw home internet customer, so how could I possibly use much mobile data? What are you two doing different than me? When my contract comes up, I’m likely going to slash my data plan down to something pretty bare-bones.

    • Muddy_Water

      I have the same 6GB as you and have used a little over 2.5 and close to 4GB on my home wifi this month. I don’t consider myself a heavy user so It’s pretty easy to rack up the data.

    • Rio

      Unfortunately we don’t all live like you.

      Some of us have long bus/train rides to sit through. Or perhaps workplaces that does not have public wifi.

      I too have 6GB/$30 and can easily go through it if I am not careful

    • It’s Me

      I don’t normally use over 5GB and this is the first time I’ve gotten that close to my 6GB. I also have wifi at home and work, but when I am at work I will sometimes go off wifi for various reasons. Emails seem to be partially blocked on wifi, so sometimes I’ll just turn it off so I don’t miss emails. If I forget to turn it back on, it’s not a big deal, but there have been times that I’ll watch a broadcast of something and end up using a fair bit of data.

      But I almost always use over 2-3 GB. I can’t imagine having only 2GB because I’d constantly have to monitor my usage.

    • gommer strike

      I’ll tell you why they’re consuming so much data.

      It’s due to them streaming data such as Google Music instead of just playing the mp3’s or FLAC files saved on the phone.

      As you noticed, it’s really hard to consume a hell of a lot of data if you’re just mostly messaging and consuming normal web content. It’s the streaming which is why some people state that even 6GB/month is not enough.

      Instead of just turning on the radio in their car – they’re streaming Radio content from their smartphone(over their data plan) and outputting that to the car’s speakers. It’s sure an expensive way to do it.

    • Andy Lights

      LTE is way faster than WIFI. First world problems, brotha

    • MassDeduction

      I just got a Lumia 1520, so this’ll be my first BRS/LTE Max phone. It’ll be interesting to see how fast it is. But it won’t stop me from using WiFi when available. I’ve been using mobile data since the 2G/circuit-switched era. You know, when data was charged *by the minute*, so WiFi is more than fast enough for me. :P

    • d3v14n7

      Because, these people never use WiFi, they think that because their phone has a data connection that they should be able to use it 24/7 without even thinking about using WiFi when they can, even when they’re at home or work… And yet, they’re the first ones to complain when the towers are congested and they’re unable to get service when they need it most… Also, there are many who use their phones to download torrents or large files from cloud storage, stream Netflix, stream music non stop, and download apps and huge games on the Play Store, all from their data connection when they’re sitting in their home, at work or local coffee shop (or within range of various carrier hotspots) with an available WiFi connection… If people used a little common sense and used the MANY WiFi connections available to them (not to mention, stopped using data on stupid things that aren’t important, such as downloading and playing online games, streaming Netflix, streaming music, downloading large files when not absolutely necessary, torrenting etc…), we wouldn’t have issues with congestion, nor would they be paying so much for data because they’d be using FAR less, but apparently, that’s asking far too much and they seem to enjoy paying more for their cell service than they need to… People need to learn to moderate their data usage and use WiFi when it’s available like the rest of the smart people out there, if they did that, the majority of users would probably use under 500MB a month easily…

    • icyhotonmynuts

      The only reason people are using WiFi more and more, is because cellular data is so goddamn expensive for the peanut amount they get.

    • It’s Me

      That’s a big reason.

    • MassDeduction

      I’ve used WiFi more simply because it’s become more available. There wasn’t a whole lot of WiFi around when I got my first data-capable cell phone (the legendary Nokia 9000 Communicator), and was using 2G/circuit-switched data and being charged by the minute rather than by the amount of data transferred. Yes, *before* GPRS. :)

    • TomsDisqusted

      You call this ruse just “a little misleading”?

    • It’s Me

      Just the part about the minutes. We do get more minutes, they just don’t get used.

    • skoupo

      This is why I think MobileSyrup reporting is bad… they know these studies are done by the Wall and who is it run by, BUT yet they don’t mention that information in their ARTICLES they post..

      Maybe mobilesyrup is one that backs the industry as well ? who knows.. it would be great if they actually stated in their articles were they STUDIES are coming from, but they don’t

    • Tim3Tripp3r

      Yes, it’s funny that Doug from Mobile Syrup always does a full disclosure at the bottom of his pieces when discussing his former employer (RIM aka BlackBerry) yet no one from Mobile Syrup thinks to mention these skewed propaganda pieces put out by firms that make a good chunk of revenue off Robelus.
      Just a “FWIW nudge nudge wink wink” at the bottom would suffice.

    • It’s Me

      It’s not just MobileSyrup. Lots of tech blogs fall into the access media trap, where if you write stories that are less than flattering about some companies you risk getting cut out of access to the company for things like executive interviews, review units, advertising, etc. I know some stories have been submitted in the past that would fall within their area of news coverage and would be of interest to their readership but they never got mentioned.

    • PT

      CRTC stand for “waste of taxpayers money”

    • Carl Girard

      Here my 6GB for 30$ option is ending in december :( I tried to get it renewed for 2 more years right now, they dont want at all. So ill loose it soon

    • Pip

      Just use the 30 day pass in your phone. Screw paying for talk and text when that can be done over your data connection.

    • Stevert

      In the last 3 years, I’ve hit my 6GB limit every month. Sometimes even going over. It’s getting worse with everything HD than before, the big 3 knew this and brought plans down to bank more.

    • It’s Me

      Actually, I’ve changed my mind. I for one would like to thank Wall communications. If not for them, I would not realize that I am paying less now. Nor would I be able to decipher my invoice correctly, because those numbers that I thought were more are actually less, I guess.

      I should hire them to study gas prices too. I assumed prices have been going up, but if I can get Wall to explain that I am actually paying less and that the larger numbers are actually smaller ones, that would be great. It would be awesome to know that while my wallet is emptying faster it’s because I am paying less.

      Thanks Wall!

  • bembol

    *insert-popcorn-smiley*

    LOL I can’t wait.

  • no

    So glad I got my 6gb/$70 plan when I did. Never signing a new contract again

    • Jeff

      You got that right. I will hold on to my 6GB for 65 plan for dear life unless things change. They have texted me 4 times and phoned me twice trying to get me to upgrade in the last 3 months or so.

    • FRiaz

      i have the same plan and pay $25 with taxes u shud call in again

    • beyond

      they’ll slowly jack up the prices for all our grandfathered plans, with the first increase coming in a few months

    • Super_Deluxe

      5GB for $55 here, and with Rogers.

    • Geo

      I got 6gb for 55 with bell and my plan just expired. They told me even if i buy my own phone outright i still would have to change my planto one of their new ones

    • sackboy

      Same here, 1 more year ugh. Then I’m leaving Rogers.

    • AKLC

      I just want to mentioned, in every contract you signed with Rogers, Telus, bell, etc. They all have a disclosure that reads something like “we hold the right to make changes without prior notification.” This little disclosure is a liability stunt so the consumer cannot sue the company over dissatisfaction of their services etc.

      Sooooo… simply speaking, only reason they reach out to you for consent for changes because its the best way to build a good reputation of their services and hopefully lock you down for another term of contract. In Reality, they can change your plan without notifying you. I used to have a plan with Rogers, after the contract expired, was not able to reach me, they automatically changed my plan and I left them immediately.

      In BC, all the cellphone provider have already made it clear, anyone whose contract expires will be automatically assigned to the new rates and plans that best fits your previous plan, you will not be able to retain your previous rates.

      I hope you meet a good retaining agent who will honor your current great deal :)

  • Hardtarget24

    “The Level 4 plan, which comprises the now-ubiquitous unlimited talk and
    text bracket, which includes voicemail and call display, uses 2GB of
    data as its base point, citing Canadians’ average monthly data use well
    below that point. For such a plan, Canadians pay $92.99″
    D: I pay Fido $54 a month for this level of service!

    • JTon

      Yeah me too. But that was an unbelievable promotion. We may not see prices like that ever again :(

    • Frederic St-Pierre

      Yeah, I got it for 52 a month taxes included… Except I have 3GB. I still feel ripped off considering I lost my 6GB plan.
      The CRTC thought they were protecting us from long contracts? That they did… But the collateral damage was less PERTINENT service for price. Unlimited talk? Who uses that anymore? Unlimited text when people are now chatting it up on IM/Facebook/Twitter?
      Our telecom situation is pitiful and articles like this just piss me off.

    • Stephen_81

      3200 minutes a month on my phone, I’m very thankful for unlimited talk.

    • MikeOxlong

      Well that explains it, at least for you.

  • djino

    $8.24/MB for U.S. incumbents to roam here in Canada. WOW!

  • OgtheDim

    So the CRTC commissions some people to do a report about the wireless industry….

    from people who used to work in the wireless industry and do consulting for it still.

    Yeah…….bias…….nawwwwwwww.

    Get a bunch of REAL auditors next time.

    • WP74Life

      I cannot agree more. They are biased as hell

    • yddtime

      Right. They should hire consultants in a completely unrelated industry to do the study. Perhaps consultants in the food and beverage industry or fish and wildlife field would be unbiased. Yeah, that would do it.

  • AGoodM8

    I’m lucky to pay $6.67/mo for unlimited texts, incoming calls, and $2 per day for unlimited data & outgoing calls on WIND’s grandfathered Pay Your Way plan. I’ve yet to see a better bang-for-buck plan, and seeing as how lower tiered plans are getting more expensive, I doubt that is going to change.

    • FRiaz

      you are paying 67 dollars a month? there are better options actually

    • AGoodM8

      Haha NOPE! I’m paying SIX dollars and SIXTY SEVEN cents a month. Or more accurately, $40 every 6 months but it works out to $6.67/mo. No 911 fees or anything, just tax (so a smidge under $8/mo all in)

    • OgtheDim

      What’s that “and $2 per day” thing mean then?

    • AGoodM8

      Oh let me explain.

      I only have to top up $40 every 6 months to keep my prepaid line active. That works out to the most economical price by the month for one unlimited calling feature (incoming calls to be specific) bundled with unlimited texting, of any plan in the country – as far as I could find anyways.

      Of the minimum $40 top up, $30 goes towards the $5/mo unlimited SMS add-on (6 months x $5/mo). For the rest of the credits, I’m free to use them towards pay per use (PPU) charges.

      For unlimited everything by the day – all I have to do is incur $2 in PPU charges on any given day and I get bumped up to unlimited everything until midnight. Since the only important features I’m missing from the base plan are outgoing calls and data, that’s what I’d be using the $2 daypass for.

      It helps that I have lots of access to Shaw/Telus WiFi + don’t frequently call people enough to justify paying for unlimited calls by the month, so this plan made sense to me.

    • RS

      So you can’t use data unless you pay for a $2 day pass? I don’t think that’s a sensible plan for most people.

    • AGoodM8

      Well I already have a lot of access to shaw go WiFi and telus WiFi here in downtown Vancouver, so paying for wind’s unlimited data plan would be paying for a redundant connection 75% of the time for me. You’re right that it wouldn’t make sense to a lot of people but then again most people aren’t going to have this much WiFi access….

  • Eli_Vance

    How long before the Big 3 shills show up and tell us how good we have it here in Canada?

    • It’s Me

      16 minutes after your post :)

      They are getting slow.

    • Who Needs Facts

      Not too sure anyone is saying how good we have it. Just adding balance is all. I too would like to pay less.

      I just don’t believe that the government meddling in the business affairs of the wireless market is good for the industry nor Canadians.

      You may believe different but I would not sit and call you a left wing shill or a “Wind” shill – it sort of sounds like whining.

    • Stephen_81

      I do want government meddling, except I don’t want governments giving away things for cheap to business or getting in the way of competition.

      I want to see the Government regulate the wholesale market so smaller players can compete buying wholesale access for roaming on the larger carriers are reasonable prices. But let the Big 3 bid and win leaded spectrum for fixed amounts of time, unused spectrum is reauctioned at the end of the fixed time for other players to get a shot.

    • Who Needs Facts

      I suppose the roaming thing comes back to “the big three got their spectrum for free” so everyone should have access to it and I don’t outright dismiss that argument – or didn’t at least.

      The past six years have seen the incumbents pay more than market value. I would consider that overall, the public has been compensated for the spectrum that was “gifted”.

      Regarding wholesaling then, I don’t think the incumbents should be allowed to price at more than market value to the new entrants. Meaning…if they deem it would cost X amount of dollars for their customers to use Y amount of spectrum, that is what the wholesalers should pay. Nothing more, nothing less.

      And with regards to spectrum – maybe it is time a third party (or the government “owns” the spectrum and it is leased on an as needed basis. The same price for everyone.

    • Stephen_81

      I am not of the camp that thinks it was wrong for the government to “gift” spectrum to the carriers. The industry needed to be developed and the Government fostered that development which resulted in copious amounts of tax dollars and innovation in the tech space because of that fostering.

      That said, the last mile regulation for landline service helped foster greater home internet competition and I feel that the government should foster that in the wireless space.
      I don’t think we need a 3rd party owning spectrum, letting the government lease it to carriers and ensure the carriers use it and don’t squat on it just to keep small players from having it should be enough.

  • FRiaz

    I get 6gb data unlimited talk and text canada wide and int text from and pay $25 incl tax…

    • PT

      You forgot to take your med today … again?

  • Guest

    Very convenient that the higher end plans have tons of minutes and call features – which few people need and the carriers are now selling cheap – and comparatively little data, which is what most of us are after.

    The 6gb data plans that so many of us got for $25 or 30 have been redefined our of existence so they can cover up the massive price increases on the one thing we really want in a high-end plan!

  • Who Needs Facts

    “Compared to other countries, Canadians still pay more than most in Europe for the same wireless plans, but pay significantly less than the U.S. and Japan for those in the higher tiers.”

    France and Italy have a disposable income of a third to one half that of Canadians. Of course we pay more. We earn more.

    And try and find 4G out side of a major city in France or Italy.

    • It’s Me

      So it’s because we make more? That makes our carriers what, some kind of Robin Hood figures? They rob from the rich to give to themselves?

      That’s nice of them.

    • Who Needs Facts

      The amount of our income spent on wireless services is more relative than the flat numbers that are published suggest is all. I never looked at ARPU for the Euro carriers.

    • marorun1982

      LoL thats a way to see thing.

      I think he mean the inflation of the economy what make something here cost a price and a different price in another country.

      An example Buy a condo in France and you looking at 400000 euro and more for a 2 chamber condo with 1 kitchen 1 bathroom and 1 ( salon in french dont remember in english sorry )

      Here in Canada you can get those from 200000$

      I hope i dont need to explain thats 1 euro worth more than 1$ too…

      another example is a mid sized sedan brand new 2014 costnearly 275000$ in cuba and only cost 30000$ here ( ofcourse in this case the inflation is caused by the fact thats only cuban sanctioned place can sell them and the governement make like 500% profit on top of the proft the car dealer make.. )

      There is various reason for inflation but usualy the inflation will influence greatly on the price of everything from country to country.

    • OgtheDim

      Speaking of not needing facts.

      Cost of living in Europe is way higher then here. Almost everything costs more….except wireless plans, beer and wine.

    • Who Needs Facts

      Not sure where “here” is for you but for Vancouver and most places in Europe the cost of living index is a wash – Paris excluded.

    • It’s Me

      Sure, if you take the single most expensive city in Canada as your point of reference. I know you excluded Paris, but we might as well just use them for point of reference for the EU.

    • Who Needs Facts

      Well i live in Vancouver…Calgary is the same..

      I found four webpages devoted to cost of living – not too hard to look up yourself.

      Meant to add, I excluded Paris because like New York and a few other cities, their cost is not consistent with the countries cost, mostly due to real estate.

  • Clark Kent

    Why don’t you revolt !!! Gather yourselves from blogs like this & start writing petitions and let anyone you know sign it. Act as a lobby on the government so it will force those rubbers to cave to the people demands. Don’t underestimate your large numbers. Stop complaining here & start doing it aloud, contact news agencies go to social media… Do something anything…

    • Stephen_81

      Why do that?
      Why not just leave the Big 3 carriers and sign on with WIND or whom ever else is offering the price point you want.

      We have some choice, vote with your wallet

    • Clark Kent

      Wind Mobile is only available for people who lives in Ontario & cities like Vancouver, Calgary & Edmonton , but for the rest of us in other parts of Canada there is no wind stores. (you are welcome to check on their website) so how the population of Canada can sign with wind?

    • AGoodM8

      That’s a fair point. That said, the regional carriers help too. SaskTel in Saskatchewan. MTS in Manitoba. TBayTel in Thunder Bay. Videotron in Quebec. It’s a mess, and it’s rather evident that is why there’s no true 4th national carrier. But there are options in enough places for people to leave the big 3 in greater numbers than they do.

      Unfortunately most have accepted the state of the market and allowed the big 3 to rob them blind.

    • Stephen_81

      I am not in a WIND zone, so I do understand your stance.

      But the complaints people always are bringing up and saying Canada needs more competition and better pricing are comparing to companies that have geographic coverage similar to WIND with 10+ times the population draw.

      As for the population of Canada coverage WIND has, just using the 20 largest cities covered in their coverage map they have just shy of 10 Million which is just shy of 30% of all of Canadians.

      So of the coverage they have they have managed to attract less than 10% of users who live in that zone with the great pricing, WHY would anyone expand out to new areas if they can only expect to gain sub 10% of the subscriber base.

    • Who Needs Facts

      I imagine that this was very close to the context of Vimplecom’s email to Lacavera pior to the 700Mhz auction.

      I also believe “National” network means something very different to Lacavera than the average Canadian wireless subscriber.

    • Zomby2D

      Because in my area there is no one else. I’ve got the choice between Telebec (a Bell Aliant company), Telus/Koodo and Rogers (who doesn’t even cover half the territory)

  • Guest

    I’m paying $58.45 (taxes incl) every month with Koodo for all-you-can-eat minutes/texts, the usual add-ons (like call display, voicemail, etc) and 2GB of data. All of which still seems slightly absurd compared to what I was getting in some European countries while living/traveling abroad.

    • ToniCipriani

      You’re paying too much… Look up Koodo 5GB/$55. ;)

    • KB2755

      Looked up, doesn’t exist.

      All the carriers have eliminated these plans. If you still have one, hold onto it.

    • ToniCipriani

      Switch your province to MB/SK. Then search around to see how you can get them.

  • cbsmart

    Where does Wall Report get their data from? Are they basing this on subsidizing a new phone?

    AT&T Unlimited Talk/Text + 2 GB data is only $65 for one line. Their prepay (gophone) is $60
    Verizon has the same plan as well, and T-Mobile has slightly better pricing.
    IF you want to subsidize a new phone, the plans are only $15 more for a total of $80 at AT&T and Verizon)
    Is this chart made by the Big 3, to try to show that Canadians pay less than the US? If the US numbers are this far off, does that mean the other countries are all off as well?
    ** Also, Unlimited = nationwide…”Long Distance” disappeared years ago…

    (I currently have Canadian Service with Fido, and US monthly service with AT&T.)

    • It’s Me

      They are very selective in how the create their reports. This affects how they structure the buckets, which carriers are used, what plans are used with the carriers, how they weight contracts vs month to month vs prepaid, whether they use subsidized plans, etc, etc, etc. Anything that would not show our carriers in a positive light is left on the floor.

    • Who Needs Facts

      It’s a plot!!!

    • It’s Me

      Nah, just reality. Some companies are cozy.

      I wouldn’t go to the Toronto Star for a hard hitting piece on Liberal corruption or to the Sun for a balance about the Cons.

    • Who Needs Facts

      Lol – on that we finally have something we can agree on!!!

  • SkAshe

    I don’t understand where they take their numbers from. In France, it’s 20 euros for everything unlimited with 20gb of data and here it says that it’s $50 for 2gb.

    • Stephen_81

      How much cheaper is it if you get 2GB of data vs unlimited?

    • Who Needs Facts

      France is a curious case. The growth of “Free” which for the most part uses “wifi” technology and not “wireless” spectrum allowed them to undercut the “Big 3″.

      I suspect that we will see more and more of this as broadband providers change their set top boxes to be public access points – if not installing them outright as Shaw and now Telus are doing.

  • 5Gs

    Wall Communications ( firewall ) I want Wall to do the index for gas prices and car insurance companies and tell me i am paying less. Jokee!

  • L Joel

    So I take it that PROMOTIONAL plans are exempt from these studies? Because my current (2012)60$ plan for 5gigs would cost me 120$ today if i renewed with a new device… ya less for more indeed

    • Scazza

      They are talking about brand new plans for new consumers. Existing or grandfathered plans are not included.

    • L Joel

      My plan was new in 2012

    • Stephen_81

      so your plan was from before the new regulations?

  • Scazza

    Reading all the i****s on here makes me laugh. You cry foul on this commissioned study set out by the people who want to see if the rules they implemented are working, just like every industry under the sun does, and then complain about their numbers, yet can’t actually say WHY you don’t agree, just “pfft, must be fake” Why not do the math yourself? Or pay a supposedly more reputable company to do it for you instead of holding onto your inane idea that if MUST be evil because you are too stupid to do the work yourself.
    People, myself included, have been saying exactly these things before. If you actually spend time to look at the US and Japan for rates, we don’t have it anywhere near as bad as they do, yet you cry for a kind and just US carrier to come and save you from the big bad Robellus, yet are too blind to actually check out prices and see that you have no idea what you are asking for. There are entire regions of the US where there is ONE carrier and ONE home service provider.
    Comparing North America to the EU is absolutely bonkers, and there are reasons their rates are a fraction of ours, but we don’t have all day to school the children who are too lazy to even check out TMobile or Verizons website for prices before the run to mobilesyrup to explain how we have it the worst. You guys are worse than videogame console fanboys in your blind idiocy.
    The table lays out the data nicely for you guys, please if you have further data to add, feel free to post it, instead of “lolz, they are paid off!” You can actually click the link and read their methodology, and see they compare apples to apples in all regions.

    Also love the calling out of Mobilesyrup as a shill for the CRTC. Why do you guys visit here then? You guys just want to hate.

  • Who Needs Facts

    One other thing that I found interesting. Here are about half a dozen headlines from the same story, all from today.

    “Canadian mobile customers now pay less for more, and more for less: Wall Report”

    “Wireless rates falling in Canada despite lack of fourth national carrier, study says”

    “Wireless plans rising despite Ottawa’s efforts”

    “Cost of basic cellphone service up 16 per cent in a year”

    “Canadian mobile prices higher than peers, report says”

    “CRTC’s wireless cancellation policy boosts cost of basic plans: study”

    “Wireless Policies Working to Lower Prices for Canadian Families”

    Stats are indeed in the eye of the beholder.

    • jclowater

      What stats? These are wireless price plans, not stats.

    • Wufai

      These prices become states when they are averaged out into a single value based the the criteria given.

  • Ernie

    I have seen Koodo`s rate plans increase in price while decreasing in service provided. I pay $55émonth for unlimited calling anywhere in Canada while I am anywhere in Canada, with VM CallerID and 2 gigs of data. I got that plan just over a year ago now. You look at the plans they offer now. For the same plan less 1 gig data. It`s like $80 now. It`s getting pricey again!!!!

  • abc123

    Pay less for more and get more for less?

    Got ahead, Robbers, increase your prices again….

    I DARE YOU!

  • Jamie

    My first smartphone I got was the GS3. In a few days my plan will expire. I was really was looking forward to upgrading to an S5 or Experia 2. I pay $85 taxes in for a 6GB plan through Rogers. Looking ahead at plans now I would be paying at least $130. For something similar. Hard to justify, no upgrade for me. I wonder how many others are in a similar situation? If I were a smartphone manufacturer I’d be a little pissed off too diminishing their potential because people who want to upgrade won’t because it doesn’t make sense. I know poor manufacturers, a couple of them generate huge profits. Thanks CRTC for all your help. Can you say collusion both Bell and Rogers have identical plans!

  • Ocean

    This study puzzles me, I’ve worked for a national carrier for 4+ years now, and I have spoken with UK customers who reference 1GB of data with around 1000 minutes of talk time for about the $30 dollar range (~£16). That would be tier 3, approximately. Their price does not include a device subsidy, however.

  • Jakob

    Everyone always does the comparison to Europe but people always leave out the prevalence of LTE or even 4G. I’ve spent extensive time in Europe and although prices are better, the quality of the service is where the price gap exists.

  • d3v14n7

    Hahahahahahaha!

    THAT is one of the best jokes I’ve read in the last month… Oh wait, you were serious? Really MobileSyrup? Do you actually believe this absolutely ridiculous nonsense?

    Anyone who’s had cell service for the past 8 years or more will be able to see that this is complete BS, we’re paying FAR more now than we used to, no matter how many of these skewed, nonsense “studies” filled with outright lies you post by RBT shills/lobbyists/backers… No matter which way you look at it, Canadians are now paying more for less every single time, because the features or addons they included aren’t even being used by the vast majority of Canadians, which is the entire reason why they added them… They all knew damn well that even though they offered unlimited minutes, that only an extreme minority would use any more than 200 minutes a month, so it costs them literally nothing to include these addons and unlimited minutes, but they’d be able to charge more for it (and they did) and push people to pay more for things they don’t even use… If every single cell phone user would start using 2000+ minutes a month each for calls going outside their home province to landlines or different carriers, that unlimited Canada wide minutes addon would disappear so quickly, it’d make your head spin (so would the worldwide unlimited texting if Canadians started texting people overseas thousands of times a month each), but obviously that won’t happen…

  • cookipuss

    I don’t know what they’re talking about with this nonsense, because overall my smartphone plan options with Telus were consistently offering me less for more over time. To the point where, just before ditching them for Wind, I had one choice of paying $50 + a minimum of a $15 (no opt out available) for 250MB. Total was over $80 after taxes etc.