Pavlok wants to shock you into a better life

Douglas Soltys

July 12, 2014 3:45pm

While the current wearables movement is undeniable, most current devices fall into three categories: fitness, futuristic, and downright foolish. While it’s early days yet, a wearable device has yet to emerge with both broad public appeal and disruptive potential.

Maneesh Sethi, noted ‘hack’ author, is looking to change that with Pavlok, a wearable designed to improve user habits through shock therapy. Using negative reinforcement to alter behaviour patterns, Pavlok appears quite versitile in its ability to mess with your psychology. Hit the snooze button too many times? Zap. Ignoring your daily fitness goal? Zap.

Pavlok will also allow friends to keep their finger on the trigger via Facebook integration, adding an extra layer of social pressure to the physical stimulus. Posting photos from the bar when you should be at home in bed? Zap.

Pavlok is still in early beta testing, but will be launching a crowdfunding project this September to help achieve public availability by early 2015 (early short-run prototypes currently cost around $250, but final production models will be cheaper). Those interested in shocking themselves into a better life can sign up for more info at the source link below, or check out this e-book on habituation written by the Pavlok team.

SourcePavlok

  • 5Gs

    I’m shocked. .

  • St. Misery

    Couldn’t get me to wear a piece of crap like that if you paid me.

  • Jack Lee

    Not to be a total downer but that looks really uncomfortable.

  • SL920

    lol paying something to literally torture/punish you? no thanks

  • It’s Me

    Yup. Not sure many people would pay to be shocked and treated, literally, like a dog.

    • hyperhyper

      People already pay Rogers and Bell to be treated much worse than a dog and to get screwed every month? How is this any different?

    • It’s Me

      There’s a difference between getting screwed by a company you do business with and paying a company to screw with you.

      Maybe Rogers and Bell can give these out to customers. I’m sure they’d love to play a little behaviour modification game to improve their image as the most hated companies in Canada.

  • Hungrier

    Sure, it may deliver electric shocks sometimes, but what’s worse is that even when it’s not shocking you, it still looks like that.