What It Needs: HTC M8

Daniel Bader

January 22, 2014 10:24pm

The upcoming successor to the HTC One, tentatively titled One+, is likely going to be announced in March or April, roughly a year after the original’s debut. To say that HTC has had a tumultuous and disappointing year, despite releasing its best product to date in the HTC One, is to put it mildly.

But what does the company need in order to regain the momentum — and prestige — it once had, not only in the Android OEM landscape, but with its investors?

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Some History

If you recall, HTC was at the top of its game in 2010, releasing not only the first Nexus smartphone, the Nexus One, but one of the fastest (at the time) carrier-sold products in the Desire. Sporting 3.7-inch WVGA screens and single core processors, the devices seem pedestrian by today’s high standards, but the middle of 2010 was an innocent time, before Samsung took over the Android landscape.

Fast forward to the middle of 2011, when HTC released the aluminum-clad Sensation, replete with a removable back cover that doubled as an antenna. The qHD display, a bit sharper and brighter than its predecessor’s, was again unimpressive looked at today, but the Sensation was a solid device with an intriguing software skin and plenty of speed. It also debuted Sense 3.0, which was a visual evolution of the Desire’s colourful window dressing.

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But the Sensation also debuted around the same time as Samsung’s more powerful, both in specs and marketing, Galaxy S II, the Korean company’s first true hit. What followed in early 2012 was the triptych of the One X, One S and One V, a veritable gaggle of fantastic hardware. But 2012 was also the year that HTC’s fortunes began to flag in earnest, with sales dropping precipitously despite a huge global marketing campaign, competitive pricing and, arguably, huge improvements to the Sense software.

By the time 2013 rolled around, HTC needed a hit. The HTC One was certainly visually arresting, and stood on its own for many months until the One Mini and One Max, which featured smaller and larger versions of the same unibody aluminum design, came along, but the One made more than just an aesthetic statement. We loved its front-facing stereo speakers, super-fast performance and excellent low-light photos, but the device continued to struggle in the sales department against Samsung’s Galaxy S4 and, later in the year, LG’s G2 and Sony’s Xperia Z1.

From a critic’s perspective, the HTC One offered one of the most consistent Android experiences to date, but the little Taiwanese OEM posted its second straight operating loss early this year.

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HTC M8

And now we’re looking forward, as HTC readies its next industry parlay. The M8, successor to the One, has been leaked in dribs and drabs, but from what we’ve seen the company isn’t looking to change things too much.

With a 5-inch 1080p display, a Snapdragon 805 processor and a continuation of the low-megapixel-big-sensor-size Ultrapixel camera play, the M8 will likely try to differentiate itself based on software this time around. Whereas the HTC One introduced Sense 5.0, which boasted a number of interesting UX experiences like BlinkFeed and Zoe Share, M8 will likely continue to refine the Sense experience without massively uprooting the core framework.

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In doing so, HTC risks offering consumers an experience that isn’t a big enough improvement from the One. But what does the HTC One successor need in order to be considered a success? Isn’t the smartphone industry approaching a saturation point, a measure of maturity where iteration is the only logical form of progression? Does HTC merely need to fix the One’s biggest flaws in order to be considered a success?

Or, like BlackBerry, should HTC try to reinvent itself as something else? Focus, like Nokia does, on a few core tenets — ultra-sharp photography; immersive sound; superlative battery life — to separate it from the “everything-and-the-kitchen-sink” approach of Samsung and LG?

It appears likely that 2014 will, with good or bad results, be a decisive year for the company. It also seems naive to think that one smartphone alone will be able to change the company’s sagging fortunes, but a hit could at least shift the balance sheet from red ink to black.

What does the M8 need, in your eyes, to succeed?

  • KID ANDROID

    If it has the 4mp Ultra Pixel Camera it will be a complete flop, that’s the main thing holding it back from being an amazing device as well as the battery it needs a 3000mAh or higher battery. If it has both of those improved I think it will be the best phone ever made and will fly off the shelves.

    • VinceBabin

      I agree fully, I started loving the camera, then I realized I only loved the camera because I bought the phone. I realized this when I got my Note 3. It is barly a decent camera in optimal light. I loved the phone, but the one+ needs an 8mp ultra pixel camera or it will just be stuck behind the s5.

    • KID ANDROID

      Exactly it doesn’t compare to title detail you get with the Galaxy S4 and yes its better in low light but how often do day do you take photo’s in low light really. For Fort he amount amount you do the S4 or Note 3 work well enough with night mode turned on.

    • userofAndroid

      Low light in compasses so many situations. I like in the pacific northwest where sunny days don’t happen all the time and the HTC one has been amazing in the cloudy and rainy times. So many restaurants have dim lighting, and I that I can take pictures in any room without having to turn on every light.

      Add the HDR mode on this and the dual axis stabilization. The camera is amazing and best in class. The only one that competes against it and is better is the nokia 1020 .

    • VinceBabin

      For some it is a big deal, for others not so much. It’s a priority thing. The market wants cleaner larger images. A small percentage( in my opinion) are those that take photo predominantly in low light. I am not one ( why I prefer my 13mp note 3 over my 4mp one) that does a lot of low light. Half of my photos are of my kids and family while the other half is photos of my work where I can control the lighting , for the most part.

      To please the masses, an 8mp ultra would be the best, if they could incorporate an ad card and maybe a removable battery and they would be on top. They already have a great screen and audio, they need the one+ , a smaller low end model and a note killer, make it with the same specs as the one+ make it 5.7″ or 6″ and make a canned pen, call it the OnePen. I’d think of buying the phablet one if it had good specs and a spen like stylus.

      But we know what will happen. The one+ will have a 4mp camera with a 2mp assistant focus camera. The one+ mini will be where it needs to be, and the one+ phablet will have less or on par specs to the current one and just be a big useless phone, like it is now.

    • alexxx

      the market wants – people are zombies they are always told what to need and want, you can feed your kids broccoli or chicken nuggets, depending how creative you are with the marketing lol! I don’t care bout camera that can’t take pix in low light. HTC IS the original High Tech Computer in everyone’s pockets since 1999, they don’t follow the industry, they’vee created it, too badSamsung and apple and micro$oft massacre the innovations and our wallets. butI’m going after the evil carriers! wage war on carriers by whatever meansnecessary people!

    • Vince Berezowski

      agree, camera has been great for me. it can’t do everything but what it does (low light, macro, depth) it does very well.

    • Philosoraptor

      I beg to differ. The entire top-end Lumia lineup (920, 925, 928, 1020, and 1520) beat the HTC One camera performance. And I say that having owned an HTC One, Lumia 920, and Lumia 1020.

    • alexxx

      never even had a chance to play with Nokia’s, boo. need free money, someone post a fake ad plz, the one with stay at home mom making $2,000,000/day please! I have no windows phone device, I need one so I can review and compare for my vids. what’s the best value to get atm from Nokinoki?ya?

    • wildspin

      The OP says it will continue to use the crappy ultra-pixel camera.

    • KID ANDROID

      They have no idea they’re going by rumours

  • Shawn Payne

    I’m done with HTC. I’ve owned a Nexus One, a Desire and now I currently own a One X. I’ve enjoyed all 3 devices, but its time to try another company’s phone now. I prefer a stock Android experience with fast updates without having to Root my phone. I’m looking to see what the next Nexus or Motorola devices will offer.

    • VinceBabin

      I gave up on HTC after the one. I still have it and I still use it but my main driver is my Note 3. While not pure android it does what I need without any screwing around. But I wish HTC all the best.

    • Morgan Leigh

      I have the HTC One Google Edition and let me tell you – no matter what comes out in the next year, I will not be updating because I am so completely satisfied with the vanilla Android on the HTC One that I can easily see myself using the phone until after the end of my contract. I know it’s an American version of the phone, but I am Canadian and I got my phone through Bell and set it to the GE ROM in about an hour and a half. Totally worth it and it changes the experience of the phone. Don’t write off HTC until you have tried it.

    • VinceBabin

      I currently have the M7, got it on launch day. So I’m qualified to speak about it :). It was a great phone and I loved it, then a lot of bs and poor service got me to switch to a Note 3, and I’m in the same boat, I can see myself using this well past my end of contract. I’ll still use my One, I like it enough to not sell it. As having a M7 I really can’t see much need for the m8, the processor on it is quick and I notice very little performance difference between it and the SN800 in my Note 3, but I don’t game, listen music or videos, the odd netflix but I use headphones.
      The M7 is a multimedia phone, and that might be why it didn’t fit for me.

  • Brandon Yang

    A bigger battery would be great.

  • HeyYoWL

    It really needs one thing: better marketing. Seriously, I’ve seen more varied Apple commercials for the iPhone than I have for the One, and the iPhone needs no commercials. My mother who is not tech-savvy could pick out an iPhone, she is aware that Samsung makes a nice phone, but she wouldn’t know who HTC is and what the One is. Considering that the phone has such an easy to remember name, not enough people in the general population knows what it is. That’s terrible marketing.

    • Ro Tep

      Didnt see the one from Robert Downey Jr?? Lolz

    • HeyYoWL

      Nope, I’ve never seen that one personally. Regardless, they need to be able to do something beyond just celebrity promotion. It works if your only demographics interest is the younger crowd. But when your demographic is “everyone”, it isn’t as useful. :P

    • Josh Brown

      They have burned to many people in the past. Most people that sing HTC’s praises never owned one through 2010-2011 when your device never say one update, they locked down the bootloaders, and built horrible phones that broke after 3 months. I swore I would never buy one again and have not. People don’t forget bad experiences.

      BTW, Never buy a D-Link Router also terrible customer service!

    • Philosoraptor

      Not disputing the horrible updates in the past, but they were no different than most, if not all, Android OEMs at the time.

    • Josh Brown

      Well the S2 came out in July 2011 and is on Jelly Bean, HTC Raider 4g came out in Oct 2011 and is still stuck on ICS.

    • Matt

      Many a person has approached me on the street and asked me:
      “wow, your Galaxy is so much nicer than all the other ones I’ve seen! is it a new model?”
      “this isn’t a Galaxy, it’s an Android device made by HTC.”
      “HTC, is that a new brand?”
      “no, they’ve been around since the late ’90s”
      “Never heard of them. Cool phone though.”

      So yeah, marketing.

  • Ro Tep

    How HTC can have me back and others who went to Samsung’s boat?? 2 easy things to do : have a Removable Battery and Micro SD!!! Is it so comllicated to do it when you used to always offer it??

    • userofAndroid

      Why does anyone need a removable battery and SD card slot. Thats like asking for a tape and CD player in your carcar when you can have an aux jack or built in media player in your car. You don’t need to touch the battery anymore for any reason. Plus any battery issue are covered by manufacturer warranty. Phone are being built with enough memory in them its not like then old days where you needed the space for apps or anything.

    • Tom

      That is so ignorant… I don’t even know where to begin…

    • utard

      “Why does anyone need a removable battery and SD card slot. ”

      because they want to put a lot of data in their phones and often find themselves in a situation when they don’t have access to a charger for their phones for a prolonged period? durr

      you’re probably a htc shill

    • Ro Tep

      Exactly and nobody has unlimited data and it’s still very expensive. What happens when the phone is not fonctionnal anymore, how you gonna retrieve your precious data?? Lolz

    • Ro Tep

      It was for the userofandroid the answer lolz

    • VinceBabin

      Wow, let’s limit our customers as much as possible and then scratch our heads as to why we are not making money. I have a note 3, I do not have extra memory or a spare battery, BUT if I wanted to put one in I COULD because I have the option. I also have a One, I Still don’t need the extra battery or memory, but I also DON’T have the option if wanted to.

      It’s all about hitting as many customers by providing as many options as possible. Samsung did it, and where are they?

      Let touch on Apple, most people complain the one to the idea of the iPhone, really a dumb thing to do, HTC does not and will never have the brand loyalty Apple has. To apple fans , apple can do no wrong and that’s why they don’t need extra memory or battery replacements. HTC , and Samsung for that matter, as not even in the same ecosystem as Apple.

      All this to say if you want to beat the top, you need to be like the top and better.

    • Ro Tep

      Me and lot of people need these features. Your comparison doesn’t work at all because having many batteries abd SD cards are not things from the past. Lolz Your portable recharger can recharge in less 30 seconds?? We can find extra batteries for super cheap price on Amazon and other websites.

    • Steven Tremblay

      I totally agree!!! That’s one of the main reasons I own a Samsung and not an HTC (or iPhone for that matter). I like being able to change my own battery whenever the need arises and since I don’t have unlimited data on my plan or unlimited access to my network, I LOOOOVE the SD card slot! I know Google would love to have everyone stream everything to their phones, but it’s not practical. Those two simple features make Samsung stand out among many of the other smartphones! And let’s face it… they’re also major contributors to Samsung’s immense success. Why AREN’T more companies following THAT example???

    • Tyrone_83

      Your comment is so damn ignorant and stupid. Plain and simple when the battery dies in a non-removable phone you have to get a brand new phone. Those 8 people who thumbed this comment must be dumb as you are. What happens when the warranty runs out is the manufacturer gonna cover it? No

      Did you even think or do your research before posting that dumb comment?

    • casey

      I remember HTC was looking at offering battery replacements around the $100 mark. I’ve been in cell phone sales for almost 3 years now, and I’ve only had to replace a battery on no more then 10 phones. Other things break first on phones I find.

      When my phone drops I like not having to piece it back together because the battery door and the battery fell out, and not worrying that one of those fell behind a hard to reach place.

      The only argument I can see against built in batteries (and something I miss from my s3) is carrying a second battery, or extended batteries.

    • Matt

      I agree, much as I love my One, transferring photos from it to my computer is painful without a removable SD card. I could use G+, Dropbox or the like, but it’s still quicker and more direct to directly copy them to my local storage. Not to mention that I have a 32GB MicroSD that I used to use in my Sensation which actually gave that old device MORE storage than my new One. I get the advantages of having no removable parts – more optimized use of space, less parts to break, following Google Nexus and iPhone’s example, etc. – but I wish it was at least an option on one high-end device in HTC’s portfolio.

  • J. W.

    What HTC needs is a red & gold version of the M8, along with JARVIS as the personal assistant voice.

  • userofAndroid

    I think htc needs to continue what they are doing add more marketing and use RDJ more. Increase battery size so people can use the multimedia applications more with no worries. Also up the ultrapixel camera and I see success.

  • Tom

    Offer a pentaband Google Play Edition in Canada, and stop locking down source code (remember the DxO labs fiasco with the camera driver on MSM8960 devices running AOSP?). Actually, I could direct this at Samsung too with the way they handle drivers for the camera – making it impossible to perform at full potential on AOSP roms.

    Also, let the HTC logo be mappable as a button. That would be SICK!

  • Dave Grant

    1) Marketing, Marketing, Marketing

    2) Ditch sense, it’s complete GARBAGE. Partner with Cyanogenmod , or offer a TRUE Google experience (not the Sense-made-to-look-like Google stunt they pulled)

    3) get QC in order. Many Ones developed a red camera Hue in low light over time.

    4) don’t use cheesy buzzwords like “Boom Sound’

  • TheTruthIsNotOutThere

    As a Samsung user I highly value a removable battery and option to add more memory. I fact that had always sealed the purchase for me. At the end of the day whether your phone’s battery comes out doesn’t ruin the user experience. But if your battery starts failing you and you now have to send it in, there’s where it changes. All I have to do is order a new one, that’s it. I don’t have to wipe and back my phone before sending it in, when do I get it back, etc…

    As for the memory issue, again more useful options. With the amount of hacking going on right now, the last place I’m going to store stuff is the cloud. Aside from signing off all privileges of ever owning it. … No thanks. Besides needing a decent data plan to access your stuff whenever you choose, which most canadiens don’t. ..

    In conclusion, I don’t understand why more android oem’s are going down this road. If one arrogant lesson apple has yet to learn is that empowering and giving your customers more options is what will always win in the end.

    • Josh Brown

      So true My wife got road salt in her car charger that wrecked the charging port in her S4, it would no longer charge. Options? most phones you have none, but wait for a new charging port from china (3-4 weeks) and have no phone in the mean time. But we drove to Best Buy and bought a $40 extra battery and charging station. Now she can use her phone and just charge the extra battery and just switch until I get the new charging port and switch it out.

    • TheTruthIsNotOutThere

      My point exactly Josh. For the amount of cash we drop on these devices, I want options and the most flexibility I can get. Android and Samsung are still tops at providing that level of bang for your buck. Have a good one! !

    • Anaron

      Samsung doesn’t offer as much bang for your buck as Google (Nexus) and Motorola.

    • Chris Duffy

      Really? Motorola and Nexus devices are sub par at best. They’re midrange smartphones .. they’re not super phones by any means. They also limit options. The only benefit … they’re pure Google.

    • Anaron

      Sub par at best? The Moto X has the X8 chip for always-on voice recognition and contextual computing. And the Nexus 5 has a Snapdragon 800 and 5″ display with ~441 PPI. I’d hardly call that sub par. So, yes.. really. You get more for your money with the Moto X, Moto G and Nexus 5. HTC, Samsung and LG make great devices but I don’t want to spend $600+ for a marginally better camera.

  • Wizzy

    Add an 8 Ultrapixel camera, 5 inch display, and offer better colors on launch and use better marketing and this could be the next best thing. The One is better than any Apple or Samsung product I’ve ever used and the M8 could really bring it home. Unfortunately, I’d doubt the talent or cash is available at HTC to do that now.

  • Josh Brown

    I will never buy another HTC. Been screwed over by to many of their phones. I hate when companies don’t release updates but then also lock down the bootloaders. If you are not going to release a update at least let me flash it. Also I had way to many hardware failures and absolutely no help from HTC. I am sure I am not the only person that felt this way and that is why they are struggling not because of bad marketing.

    • Steven Tremblay

      I had a bad experience with the Nexus One when it came out. I had the defective touchscreen that didn’t respond properly. There were many customers with similar experiences, but I don’t think HTC even acknowledged the issue, essentially leaving all us in the wind…

      It’s one of the reasons I stay away from HTC.

    • Josh Brown

      I here you same thing with HTC Desire HD. They had a Aluminium unibody which was very cool except where the antennas were they had little plastic covers. well the connectors eventually lost the connection and you would lose WiFi or GPS unless you pushed on the different plastic covers. It was a good phone but that was super annoying, especially when you were trying to download something because if you moved your finger you would lose WiFi. I have experience like that with almost all of the 10 HTC devices I had.

  • CdnChris

    I have an HTC One, and have had most of the Android flagships on the market right now at one time or another. I think all you need to do is make the HTC One thinner, give it all day battery life and next gen UltraPixel camera. Release a Sense version for carriers and a Google Play Edition. The One is a fantastic device. The camera is good enough – it doesn’t stand up to the 5s or 1020, but it’s good. Battery life is the only thing that pushed me to a G2.

    • Thr1ve

      Make the HTC One thinner? Are you on crack? The last thing any smartphone needs is to be thinner… This ridiculous infatuation with thinner devices is getting out of hand, what do you gain from thinner devices? It doesn’t make them any more portable or pocketable, especially when you have a 5″ slab, and it’s even more ridiculous on tablets and ultrabooks which aren’t carried in people’s pockets, but rather in bags… If anything, smartphones, tablets and ultrabooks need to be thicker to allow for bigger batteries, better/beefier hardware (such as better cameras, lenses, flashes, bigger antennas, better speakers for smartphones and tablets. Higher end CPUs, GPUs, HDD storage etc for ultrabooks among others…), and most of all, make them easier to hold…

    • TheTruthIsNotOutThere

      I second that!!

    • CdnChris

      Thank you for reminding me why I don’t participate in comments. Caustic, inane commentary with no logical value.

    • Thr1ve

      You didn’t answer my question, instead you turned to name calling, classy, very classy…

      No logical value? Really?

      Tell me then, why would a thinner HTC One be better? What benefits would you gain from a thinner device over the current HTC One?

      Also, you asked for more battery life, so please tell me, oh logical one, how do you propose HTC installs a larger battery while making the device even thinner than it is now?

  • Sukhbir Singh

    no one wants 4 mp camera for sure.. No one will go for it. Camera should be atleast 8mp this time with ultrapixel. It should have a huge battery size of atleast 3200mAh. If they will not come up with the future configurations and specification then GS5 will take over the device very easily. One+ should come up with massive ppi of atleast 500 ppi.. and maximum luminance..

  • Sukhbir Singh

    one more thing I would like to tell about the HTC is their poor service.. I got my phone through rogers, and it took over a month to get my mic repaired by HTC.. their should be service centres in almost every city.. or collection centre. Why would a customer pay for courier charges to send the phone to the service centre??

  • Lucas Kitchen

    I don’t want a bigger screen. The One is already a monster in my pocket. I do love the look and feel of it and the stereo speakers. What I want is a proper One mini like the Z1 compact. That and fix the damn camera. What good is a low light shooter if it just looses focus and develops a red hue over time?

  • nick

    Im in the cellphone industry, definitely to help it needs a decent sized battery, a good camera and a sd card slot seems to be something alot of people want (even with the 32gb stock) also its gotta be fast it the only way id see that it will really extend its shelf life and stay strong versus the s5 and iphone.

  • Anaron

    Whether or not it’ll have the Snapdragon 805 depends entirely on when they’re releasing the device. Qualcomm says the first S805 devices will ship in late-2014. I don’t think HTC or even Samsung will wait that long to release new devices. Unless of course they somehow got their hands on the S805 before other manufacturers.

  • casey

    I currently own the one, and I will upgrade if it has a 3000+mAh battery. I love this phone, and it does get me through most days, however some get close. The only thing I like about samsung is the ability to buy a second battery.

    The whole SD card thing doesn’t bother me any. A few times my storage has gotten full, I just remove a few of my old backups from TWRP that I no longer need. I use google play music for all my music now, and I don’t take that many pictures.

    I love HTC screens. They always look really sharp in all lighting conditions, and I’ve fallen in love with sense. I upgrade phones every 6 months to a year. I’ve had some samsung and some HTC phones. With the samsung I’ve never truly enjoyed touchwiz. It just looks odd to me. Sense on the other hand I find very elegant and smooth.

  • BelgLeboTech

    Dont put finger scanner, put boom speakers of the one max. Up the ultrapixel, and market the speakers, no one else has them. The whole youth in the world will want it and the youth let the adults know whats new. and a much bigger battery.

  • danbob999

    The M8 needs only one this to succed: be better and/or cheaper than the competition.

    If it’s only a little worse than the S5, people will buy the S5 instead.

    A good start to make their device better is to stop wasting money in developping Sense. Ship with stock Android, with no locked boot loader.

    1080p is enough. Just build the same phone in 2-3 different sizes. The small phone could be 720p and have a smaller battery however the rest should be identical, including the software, RAM and look.

  • guysmiles

    I recently chose the Galaxy S4 over the HTC One back in may essentially because the S4 offered a microSD slot. I preferred the One in many ways, but 32gb storage was much too low. Overall, I prefer the design, screen and speakers on the one. But high storage is high priority for my lifestyle. Perhaps if they had sold the 64gb version through the carriers here in Canada, I could have considered HTC.

  • Nick

    I think HTC make excellent devices I had a couple (desire HD, HTC one) a few years back and it did feel quality. HTC’s biggest problem in my opinion is the locked bootloader and the extremely slow software updates. Getting rid of the networks bloatware is the first task for many people that buy their phone on a contract and HTC make this a nightmare. I switched to the S3 and then the S4 purely due to the release of rapid software updates and the ease with which they can be rooted or switched to stock android or sim free versions of the software. If they continue in this pattern they will continue to lose market share regardless of hardware, build quality etc.

  • gommer strike

    Simple. Here are THE rightful top features of any smartphone:

    1) Number f****ing ONE: Long lasting battery life(NO, not just one day. That’s embarassing. It should last the most extensive, powerful user a minimum of 3 days).

    2) Best-in-class screen technology: Don’t take something from 1-2 years ago and shove it in, hoping we won’t notice. Yes, we will compare side-by-side. Yes we do see the difference between 720/1080/4K. Don’t insult us by telling us otherwise.

    3) Best-in-class camera: At the bare minimum, the stuff that Apple uses in their latest and greatest iPhones. There is no reason for anything inferior to that. NO. REASON.

    4) Enterprise-class email/calendar/contact apps: Quick test – send yourself a calendar invite event. Now *cancel* that invite. Your smartphone’s email client should show the cancelled invite, with a “Remove from Calendar” button. If it doesn’t have that(therefore requiring you to delete the entry manually), THEN YOU FAILED. Yes you, Google.

    5) Fantastic exterior construction that speaks to the luxurious and high-end device and what it’s capable of.

    It’s a damn shame that for some unfathomable reason, without fail, that at least one of these points is left out whenever someone makes a phone. It’s 2014 now. Step it up guys.

  • Chris Duffy

    You want the perfect phone? Here’s what you need

    5″ MAX display size. That’s the sweet spot.
    3000-4000MaH battery. Full day usage, that’s one of the largest gripes.
    Expandable memory slot … it’s 2014, stop backtracking!
    Removable battery … because they don’t last forever.
    Camera that performs well in low light. 8-10MP is good enough.
    Next-Gen LTE, Bluetooth, NFC and Wireless N … common sense.

    Other than that … what else do you need? Waterproofing is nice but gives too much bulk. Super Cameras are cool, but negate idea of a slim phone … aka Nokia 2010. Fingerprint readers are … mixed for me. They don’t hurt, but shouldn’t hike the price.

    Phones are easy to make the perfect device … they just wont because then they’ll be forced to innovate too fast and won’t be able to keep up.

  • o_zzy

    HTC One.1

    137.4 x 68.2 x 9.3 mm (5.41 x 2.69 x 0.37 in), 143 g (5.04 oz)
    Super LCD3
    1080 x 1920 pixels, 5.1 inches
    Corning Gorilla Glass 3

    Android OS, v4.4.2 (KitKat)
    On Screen Buttons
    HTC Sense 6
    Boom Sound 2.0

    Micro SD (up to 128GB)
    32GB Internal Storage, 2 GB RAM

    Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
    Bluetooth v4.1 with A2DP
    NFC (including Google Wallet Support)
    Infrared Port
    microUSB v3.0 (MHL), USB On-the-go, USB Host

    13 Ultra Pixel Primary Camera, autofocus, optical image stabilization, Xenon flash
    1/1.5” sensor size, 3µm pixel size
    1080p@60fps, HDR, Video stabilization
    Front Facing: 4.1 UltraPixel Camera, 1080p@30fps, HDR, Wide Angle

    Qualcomm Snapdragon 805, 2.4 GHz Krait 450, Adreno 420

    Non-removable Li-Po 3500 mAh battery