MasterCard announces MasterPass digital wallet, coming to your device by the “end of March”

Ian Hardy

February 25, 2013 11:26 am

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At Mobile World Congress today MasterCard introduced “MasterPass.” This is an ‘evolution’ from the PayPass Wallet Services trial that was launched last year and aims to take on other competing ‘digital wallets’ such as Google Wallet and PayPal, or even to get a head start from Toronto-based EnStream.

Ed McLaughlin, chief emerging payments officer, MasterCard. “MasterPass brings together all of the ways we pay for things, from traditional plastic cards to digital wallets, and gives consumers the ability to make a payment from wherever they are and with one simple experience.” Basically MasterCard is taking a different route and enabling retailers to immediately get in on the action. MasterPass works via NFC, QR codes, tags and goes beyond simply tapping your smartphone to a terminal and gives the user the option to make purchases from anywhere – in-store or online. Let’s say you’re in your local Sunglass Hut and want that pair of glasses, but the lineup is too long. All you’d need to do is quickly go online with one click purchase and ship the glasses to your address.

MasterPass will store all your contact details stores securely stored in the cloud and it’ll act as your “connected wallet.” Finally, MasterCard notes that there’ll be “value added services” that will “enrich the shopping experience before, during and after checkout. These will include more information like account balances and real-time alerts, loyalty programs, as well as Priceless offers and experiences.”

MasterPass will be available to us Canadians at the “end of March” and it currently looks like the only financial institution to hop on board is the Bank of Montreal.

Source: MasterCard

  • Simon Tonekham

    It won’t be for a while until PC Financial, National Bank, CIBC, RBC, MBNA Canada and other financial institutions (notably credit unions) will be able to join in the bandwagon.

    I hope that these institutions will be “enabled” to utilize the new service soon.

  • Lexcyn

    Allow me to use my PC Financial MC and then we’ll talk.

  • John

    Geez no one uses cash anymore. The only plastic I swipe is debit, that way it’s money I have. Not money I owe later at 21% interest.

    • Anonymous

      It’s quite obvious you don’t know how credit cards work other than using them to rack up debt.

  • Terry

    Interac also needs to get into the NFC payment field. I really hope PC Financial jumps on board as well.

    I want to be able to use payments electronically and it would be awesome if I would get the receipt to my email.

  • lol

    John you do realize that you can use your credit card and pay the FULL amount off right? lol

  • lol

    Interac already has NFC payments for their cards.

  • Happyboy

    This is just a way to get people to spend money a lot faster and money that’s not there money in the first Place rather pay with my own cash

  • Dizz

    JACKED! Will finally get to use paypass via NFC. I can understand why it takes all the other companies so long to implement, but with Paypass terminals all over the place, why has this taken so long for Paypass? Great news! Make it work with all NFC android phones. Don’t be a fool and limit it like Rogers/CIBC did.

    • PK

      Dizz, PayPass can be done used via NFC for a long time now.

  • James

    I will never use NCF, it won’t long before it is hacked. There’s already has been instances of NCF being hacked. Imagine walking down the street and being pick pocketed via NCF

    • Sweet

      That’s exactly the big risk with NFC. A Montreal TV station demonstrated it a little while ago. Someone even posted a link to it in another discussion here on MobileSyrup.

      NFC is a hacker’s delight. People who do chose to use it, should keep it turned off until they’re about to make the payment, and then turn it off immediately after the payment is made.

    • joe public

      Yep those are dollar store android devices that have been hacked consistently via nfc and any other possible way one can think of. BlackBerry has already been cleared by the card companies as blackberry have security that protects your data unlike iphone and android.

  • James

    NFC not NCF lol

  • Patrick

    “MasterPass will have store all your contact details stores securely stored in the cloud” lol

  • Andy c

    i can see it now…

    “i have the money but my phone battery is dead. can i plug my phone in for 5 mins then i’ll pay?”

    i bet they will design the mobile wallet in a way where you somehow need a data connection. nice way to get more subs on data plans.

    • Tim

      This actually happened to me at Starbucks with Passbook on the iPhone. I walked over from work and didn’t bring my wallet. The line up was long and my phone was low on battery but I was playing games. My phone died on me with about five people in front of me and by the time I was second in line it dawned on me no longer had a way to pay for my beverage.

    • Dr.Hugo

      So you buy a phone to play games , lmao . dont feel sorry for you when your battery dies when you really need it .

  • Zod

    It’s not that hard to track how much power your phone has left.

    It sounds like a pretty cool idea (NFC payments), but like everything else, to avoid problems have multiple payment methods at your disposal.

  • Ryan

    …I just want Google Wallet to start working here in Canada.

  • Dr.Hugo

    Thats why I prefer my BB Z10 for better security when using mobile payment :)

  • Sweet

    Aside from my NFC concerns, which, as I pointed out, could be mitigated pretty well, the other concern I have with mobile payments is if my phone gets stolen. Device passwords aren’t that effective and can be easily be poached by an onlooker in public.

    Biometrics seems to be the way to mitigate that risk. Every time I try to make a payment, I have to do a biometric scan. Apple will be implementing a fingerprint scanner in their iPhones, either this year or next year (probably this year), that can detect living human skin. Some a crook can’t spoof the authentication by holding up a photo of your finger.

    Though, now that I think about it, the credit card companies will probably apply the same anti-fraud & liability policies and with physical credit cards. Perhaps I’m concerned for nothing. :-)

  • Redheadednomad

    “Let’s say you’re in your local Sunglass Hut and want that pair of glasses, but the lineup is too long. All you’d need to do is quickly go online with one click purchase and ship the glasses to your address”

    Which is faster than waiting in line how?