Bell getting ready to launch 2,600 Mhz LTE spectrum, speeds will “double what’s currently available” (Video)

Comments

  • Carlos

    And they also want the 700mhz spectrum? Damn

    • Shamu

      oh isn’t this great… Bell and Rogers already have better phones than us (Telus) and now they will have a better and more robust network… I see TELUS has responded to this announcement by releasing the HTC One V!! I bet Rogers and Bell are shaking in their boots now!!! Telus, that’s sarcasm..just letting you know

  • anonymous

    This is purely a gimmick.

  • Duw

    2600 (band 7) is also used worldwide.

  • JustAnotherDan

    So… what do they need 700MHz for??

    • Brad F

      700 MHz would allow for better range, better penetration. Better for rural areas that would otherwise only have access to dial-up internet.

  • Pi

    I wish I could get these kinds of speeds from my home internet connection!

  • bob

    It’s not that 2600 MHz wouldn’t be good for phones. In fact it is used in South Korea and Europe.
    The problem is that Bell doesn’t have the clout to get manufacturers to make them 700/1700/2600 MHz LTE + 850/1900 MHz UMTS phones.
    So they will have to settle for 700/1700 LTE + 850/1900 UMTS, which is exactly what AT&T is using in the US so there is a huge demand for it.

    • A

      its funny, Rogers already has the 330u with 2.6 already, in an interesting twist, it doesn’t have the 700 band in it so I guess LTE roaming won’t happen at all in the US in the near term.

  • Alex

    700MHz would be used in lower density situations.

    It has less capacity that higher frequencies, but propagates further from a single tower. For any carrier, 700MHz allows for a cheaper deployment in mid to low density, with the other frequencies to supplement capacity.

    • kris

      are you sure? its kinda the oppisite. 700mhz has high penatration the big 3 want it because it can be deployed in the big cities and serve many ppl with less dead spots in tight urban areas since it can go through like 10 feet of concrete(they probably also want to fry our brains in the process)

  • bob

    2600 is used for LTE in other countries. On phones too. There is nothing wrong with it.

    The problem is that Bell gets AT&T phones. And AT&T is 700/1700 LTE and 850/1900 UMTS.

    So Bell won’t be able to get 700/1700/2600 MHz LTE phones.

  • standard_gary

    Does anyone know if this is faster than wifi? I am trying to debate between getting a wifi only or LTE iPad.

    • s2556

      yes wayyy faster. home wifi gets between 7 and 25 mbps i think but you have to pay for the speed increases with most providers

    • bob

      depends on your home connection

    • Chris

      yeah its faster than the average WiFi speed at someones house. Though a home connection tends to maintain a steady speed, LTE wont, on top of this ur wifi wont have a limit of a few GB. With LTE if you use that speed to its potential, u have a huge bill.

      ur better off getting wifi tablet and tethering it to ur phone for when its needed, this also means one bill.

    • stylinred

      the LTE versions come with wifi… afaik

      and yes LTE is faster but you’re going to have to pay an arm and a leg X2 for it (so price wife wifi is still better)

      the ipad does have wifi 5G support though so if you have a good router and fast internet connection (like shaws 50mb+ packages) you’ll get great speeds anyways

  • Nick

    Who cares? I’m going to be skeptical of LTE until they start increasing data caps too.

    I’d rather be able to browse twice as much content than consume the same amount of content slightly faster.

  • WetCardboard

    700MHz has much better penetration because of the longer wavelength…so actually it’s just as useful in urban areas because they want to get the signal into parkades, large buildings, underground, etc.

  • Lukeiphone

    Wowww go bell go!!

    • Eluder

      Yah, way to catch up to what Rogers has already!
      Lol.

  • CBV

    The average consumer does not need this. Its just a gimick to make people think they need it. Its like pre ordering a game with useless benefits. When u can get the same game in 2 weeks for a same/lesser price. Its just for bragging rights.

  • Big 3

    i hope firms worldwide are able to move past 2G gsm and set a common quad or penta band for higher generations so there can be world phones without depending on 2G. otherwise. cell phone’s reception hardware will just get bigger and bigger since new phones need 2G/3G/4G to be a world phone. its already too late to set common bands for LTE since spectrums have been auctioned off but i hope 5G can be the one to replace 2G so new phones will only need 4G/5G or 5G/6G to be a world phone. now, becuz of no common bands, a world phone using LTE will need 700/1700/1800/2100/2600(plus more in future) currently which there is no such phone with all these bands.

  • Jason

    Doesn’t Rogers already use 2600? On their launch date they showed speeds of ~ 99Mb/s and this was not in a test lab!

  • Accophox

    So wait, when did Bell pick up 2600Mhz spectrum?

    And @Jason (hopefully above) – Rogers also uses AWS for LTE.

    • shoo

      I may be wrong, but I believe that 2.6Ghz is unlicensed spectrum, similar to how your cordless kitchen phone, or wireless router operates on 2.4Ghz.

    • bob

      2600 MHz is not open at all.

      Bell and Rogers bought it a while ago. I beleive it’s the spectrum that was used for portable rural internet aka pre-wimax that they are now shutting down.

    • A

      its the Inukshuk spectrum that they got from the US company they bought, they are turning down Inukshuk to deploy this.

  • MC Lin

    [/sarcasm mode on]Wooo, another frequency… which the current devices wouldn’t support, but these new new devices will! More upgrades! More money to the vendors![/sarcasm mode off]

    Seriously, why don’t these carriers concentrate their efforts on 700? Isn’t 700 “beachfront property”? Isn’t two bands (AWS + 700) enough?

  • shoo

    usually the lower the Hertz the larger the deployment area, better reliability, and better the building penetration

    But for speed, higher hertz is better.

  • MG

    Maybe faster speeds, but still the same CRAP customer service and ridiculously high rates.

    Thanks but no thanks.

  • Pointer

    Robellus’ First Law of Telecommunication states that there exist a proportional relationship between speed and price.

    An increase in speed also equals an equivalent amount in price.

  • Pointer

    Robellus’ Second Law of Telecommunication states that there also exist an inverse relation between speed and price, a decrease in speed causes an equivalent amount to increase in price.

    So a 50% drop in speed causes a 50% increase in price. The common unit is called the Robbers

    • Jake

      There is no extra cost for LTE with Bell on their rate plans….just sayin

  • Anonymous

    Anybody who doesn’t think this is a gimmick is retarded.
    Bell;
    Hey!!! I got an idea! Let’s get some press in here and show them what WE’RE doing and how awesome it’s going to be, but we won’t actually ever use THIS specific application because it won’t actually work IRL.

    If ANYBODY makes a 2600 MHz tower, they would prob have to put it in the middle of a field, and 2600/700= roughly 3.5 so 3.5 less strong than the 700hz band. Obviously it won’t work out EXACTLY that well so don’t cry about that number.

    But your router operates close to these frequencies and your router doesn’t go through a brick wall (WELL ANYWAYS), how would anybody expect this to be useful other than if you put it on top of every building.

    JUST THEORIZING ASSHOLES

  • Otter

    Anyone else wonder why their CELL PHONE speeds are higher than their home internet speeds?

    Hmmmm….

  • Telurian

    Bell and Rogers were given the gift of the 2500/2600 MHz spectrum (along with some 3500 MHz) by their good friends at CRTC under the rouse they would provide wireless broadband services to the rural areas of Canada and both of these telephants became equal partners in Inukshuk. The original plan was to use these bands using WiMAX technology but since Rogers never believed in WiMAX (their main vendor Ericsson, never produced a WiMAX radio network component)… Both Bell and Rogers held on to the 2500/2600 band and used it to provide a proprietary wireless broadband service while they waited for 3GPP to approve the LTE technology as part of the ITU roadmap which would eliminate the WiMAx competition from IEEE.
    Bsically the Canadian telephants are now using he gifted 2500 and 2600 MHz bands to launch their LTE services and they have enough bandwidth in these bands to provide excellent speeds and services — but — the Canadian people were robbed since this spectrum is gold and they paid a tin price for it.. they want the 700 MHs to provide an underlay network (longer distance ) along with the 2500/2600 – (greater capacity)overlay to basically sew up all competition for the next 15 years in Canada.
    The 3500 stuff they had for the original WiMAX is useless in a mobile network and they have leased much of that to wide eyed new carriers, mostly in the rural areas on Canada. The recent rule change allowing the mobile platforms to be able to provide fixed services eliminates their need for the 3500 MHz spectrum and will ensure the carriers running it will be pushed out and replaced === 3500 MHz WiMAX cannot compete against 700/2500/2600 LTE — The Canadian consumer has been sold down the river by CRTC and by these two behemoth carriers who don’t give a damn about the amount Canadians have to pay and the innovation hit Canadians will suffer due to lack of competition in this vital area — they are also buying all of the content they can afford and this will also force the consumer to pay higher rates due to less choice… Sad but true…
    Ian

  • Telurian

    Bell and Rogers were given the gift of the 2500/2600 MHz spectrum (along with some 3500 MHz) by their good friends at CRTC under the rouse they would provide wireless broadband services to the rural areas of Canada and both of these telephants became equal partners in Inukshuk. The original plan was to use these bands with WiMAX technology but since Rogers never believed in WiMAX (their main vendor Ericsson, never produced a WiMAX radio network component)… Both Bell and Rogers held on to the 2500/2600 band and used it to provide a proprietary wireless broadband service while they waited for 3GPP to approve the LTE technology as part of the ITU roadmap which would eliminate the WiMAx competition from IEEE.
    Bsically the Canadian telephants are now using the gifted 2500 and 2600 MHz bands to launch their LTE services and they have enough bandwidth in these bands to provide excellent speeds and services — but — the Canadian people were robbed since this spectrum is gold and they paid a tin price for it.. they want the 700 MHs to provide an underlay network (longer distance ) along with the 2500/2600 – (greater capacity)overlay to basically sew up all competition for the next 15 years in Canada.
    The 3500 stuff they had for the original WiMAX is useless in a mobile network and they have leased much of that to wide eyed new carriers, mostly in the rural areas of Canada. The recent rule change allowing the mobile platforms to be able to provide fixed services eliminates their need for the 3500 MHz spectrum and will ensure the carriers running it will be pushed out and replaced === 3500 MHz WiMAX cannot compete against 700/2500/2600 LTE — The Canadian consumer has been sold down the river by CRTC and by these two behemoth carriers who don’t give a damn about the amount Canadians have to pay or the innovation hit Canadians will suffer due to lack of competition in this vital area — they are also buying all of the content they can afford and this will also force the consumer to pay higher rates due to less choice… Sad but true…
    Ian

    • A

      not entirely true, Bell got it through the US company that held licenses in Canada. 2.6 was auctioned off if you check the spectrum auctions, its just it was auctioned off as a fixed wireless spectrum and not a mobility spectrum.

  • A

    remember folks, that the speeds advertised are shared among all users on the sector so for Bell this would be more efficient than using HSPA for data.

  • Cody

    It doesn’t mean anything if I have can’t get the speeds in like 80% of Canada…

  • Goopers

    Why did Bhell get almost free spectrum?

    Windicity should be gratified to encourage competition. But with the only rule that they cover all cities and their 120km radius and major canadian highways. KILL THE ROBELLUS!